Background: #fff
Foreground: #000
PrimaryPale: #8cf
PrimaryLight: #18f
PrimaryMid: #04b
PrimaryDark: #014
SecondaryPale: #ffc
SecondaryLight: #fe8
SecondaryMid: #db4
SecondaryDark: #841
TertiaryPale: #eee
TertiaryLight: #ccc
TertiaryMid: #999
TertiaryDark: #666
Error: #f88
/*{{{*/
body {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}

a {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
a:hover {background-color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
a img {border:0;}

h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6 {color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]]; background:transparent;}
h1 {border-bottom:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
h2,h3 {border-bottom:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}

.button {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.button:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; border-color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]];}
.button:active {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]];}

.header {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.headerShadow {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
.headerShadow a {font-weight:normal; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
.headerForeground {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.headerForeground a {font-weight:normal; color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]];}

.tabSelected{color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]];
	background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]];
	border-left:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];
	border-top:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];
	border-right:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];
}
.tabUnselected {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.tabContents {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
.tabContents .button {border:0;}

#sidebar {}
#sidebarOptions input {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a {border:none;color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a:active {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; background:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}

.wizard {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.wizard h1 {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; border:none;}
.wizard h2 {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border:none;}
.wizardStep {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];
	border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.wizardStep.wizardStepDone {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
.wizardFooter {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]];}
.wizardFooter .status {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.wizard .button {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; border: 1px solid;
	border-color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]] [[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]];}
.wizard .button:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; background:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.wizard .button:active {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border: 1px solid;
	border-color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]] [[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]] [[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]];}

#messageArea {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
#messageArea .button {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]]; border:none;}

.popupTiddler {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; border:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}

.popup {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; border-left:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]]; border-top:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]]; border-right:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; border-bottom:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}
.popup hr {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; border-bottom:1px;}
.popup li.disabled {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.popup li a, .popup li a:visited {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border: none;}
.popup li a:hover {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border: none;}
.popup li a:active {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border: none;}
.popupHighlight {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
.listBreak div {border-bottom:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.tiddler .defaultCommand {font-weight:bold;}

.shadow .title {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.title {color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]];}
.subtitle {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.toolbar {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.toolbar a {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
.selected .toolbar a {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.selected .toolbar a:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}

.tagging, .tagged {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; background-color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]];}
.selected .tagging, .selected .tagged {background-color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.tagging .listTitle, .tagged .listTitle {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]];}
.tagging .button, .tagged .button {border:none;}

.footer {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
.selected .footer {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}

.sparkline {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]]; border:0;}
.sparktick {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]];}

.error, .errorButton {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; background:[[ColorPalette::Error]];}
.warning {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]];}
.lowlight {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}

.zoomer {background:none; color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]]; border:3px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}

.imageLink, #displayArea .imageLink {background:transparent;}

.annotation {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border:2px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]];}

.viewer .listTitle {list-style-type:none; margin-left:-2em;}
.viewer .button {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]];}
.viewer blockquote {border-left:3px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.viewer table, table.twtable {border:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}
.viewer th, .viewer thead td, .twtable th, .twtable thead td {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.viewer td, .viewer tr, .twtable td, .twtable tr {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.viewer pre {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]];}
.viewer code {color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]];}
.viewer hr {border:0; border-top:dashed 1px [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.highlight, .marked {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]];}

.editor input {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.editor textarea {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; width:100%;}
.editorFooter {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}

#backstageArea {background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
#backstageArea a {background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border:none;}
#backstageArea a:hover {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; }
#backstageArea a.backstageSelTab {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
#backstageButton a {background:none; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border:none;}
#backstageButton a:hover {background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border:none;}
#backstagePanel {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border-color: [[ColorPalette::Background]] [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}
.backstagePanelFooter .button {border:none; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.backstagePanelFooter .button:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
#backstageCloak {background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; opacity:0.6; filter:'alpha(opacity:60)';}
/*}}}*/
/*{{{*/
* html .tiddler {height:1%;}

body {font-size:.75em; font-family:arial,helvetica; margin:0; padding:0;}

h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6 {font-weight:bold; text-decoration:none;}
h1,h2,h3 {padding-bottom:1px; margin-top:1.2em;margin-bottom:0.3em;}
h4,h5,h6 {margin-top:1em;}
h1 {font-size:1.35em;}
h2 {font-size:1.25em;}
h3 {font-size:1.1em;}
h4 {font-size:1em;}
h5 {font-size:.9em;}

hr {height:1px;}

a {text-decoration:none;}

dt {font-weight:bold;}

ol {list-style-type:decimal;}
ol ol {list-style-type:lower-alpha;}
ol ol ol {list-style-type:lower-roman;}
ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:decimal;}
ol ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:lower-alpha;}
ol ol ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:lower-roman;}
ol ol ol ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:decimal;}

.txtOptionInput {width:11em;}

#contentWrapper .chkOptionInput {border:0;}

.externalLink {text-decoration:underline;}

.indent {margin-left:3em;}
.outdent {margin-left:3em; text-indent:-3em;}
code.escaped {white-space:nowrap;}

.tiddlyLinkExisting {font-weight:bold;}
.tiddlyLinkNonExisting {font-style:italic;}

/* the 'a' is required for IE, otherwise it renders the whole tiddler in bold */
a.tiddlyLinkNonExisting.shadow {font-weight:bold;}

#mainMenu .tiddlyLinkExisting,
	#mainMenu .tiddlyLinkNonExisting,
	#sidebarTabs .tiddlyLinkNonExisting {font-weight:normal; font-style:normal;}
#sidebarTabs .tiddlyLinkExisting {font-weight:bold; font-style:normal;}

.header {position:relative;}
.header a:hover {background:transparent;}
.headerShadow {position:relative; padding:4.5em 0em 1em 1em; left:-1px; top:-1px;}
.headerForeground {position:absolute; padding:4.5em 0em 1em 1em; left:0px; top:0px;}

.siteTitle {font-size:3em;}
.siteSubtitle {font-size:1.2em;}

#mainMenu {position:absolute; left:0; width:10em; text-align:right; line-height:1.6em; padding:1.5em 0.5em 0.5em 0.5em; font-size:1.1em;}

#sidebar {position:absolute; right:3px; width:16em; font-size:.9em;}
#sidebarOptions {padding-top:0.3em;}
#sidebarOptions a {margin:0em 0.2em; padding:0.2em 0.3em; display:block;}
#sidebarOptions input {margin:0.4em 0.5em;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel {margin-left:1em; padding:0.5em; font-size:.85em;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a {font-weight:bold; display:inline; padding:0;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel input {margin:0 0 .3em 0;}
#sidebarTabs .tabContents {width:15em; overflow:hidden;}

.wizard {padding:0.1em 1em 0em 2em;}
.wizard h1 {font-size:2em; font-weight:bold; background:none; padding:0em 0em 0em 0em; margin:0.4em 0em 0.2em 0em;}
.wizard h2 {font-size:1.2em; font-weight:bold; background:none; padding:0em 0em 0em 0em; margin:0.4em 0em 0.2em 0em;}
.wizardStep {padding:1em 1em 1em 1em;}
.wizard .button {margin:0.5em 0em 0em 0em; font-size:1.2em;}
.wizardFooter {padding:0.8em 0.4em 0.8em 0em;}
.wizardFooter .status {padding:0em 0.4em 0em 0.4em; margin-left:1em;}
.wizard .button {padding:0.1em 0.2em 0.1em 0.2em;}

#messageArea {position:fixed; top:2em; right:0em; margin:0.5em; padding:0.5em; z-index:2000; _position:absolute;}
.messageToolbar {display:block; text-align:right; padding:0.2em 0.2em 0.2em 0.2em;}
#messageArea a {text-decoration:underline;}

.tiddlerPopupButton {padding:0.2em 0.2em 0.2em 0.2em;}
.popupTiddler {position: absolute; z-index:300; padding:1em 1em 1em 1em; margin:0;}

.popup {position:absolute; z-index:300; font-size:.9em; padding:0; list-style:none; margin:0;}
.popup .popupMessage {padding:0.4em;}
.popup hr {display:block; height:1px; width:auto; padding:0; margin:0.2em 0em;}
.popup li.disabled {padding:0.4em;}
.popup li a {display:block; padding:0.4em; font-weight:normal; cursor:pointer;}
.listBreak {font-size:1px; line-height:1px;}
.listBreak div {margin:2px 0;}

.tabset {padding:1em 0em 0em 0.5em;}
.tab {margin:0em 0em 0em 0.25em; padding:2px;}
.tabContents {padding:0.5em;}
.tabContents ul, .tabContents ol {margin:0; padding:0;}
.txtMainTab .tabContents li {list-style:none;}
.tabContents li.listLink { margin-left:.75em;}

#contentWrapper {display:block;}
#splashScreen {display:none;}

#displayArea {margin:1em 17em 0em 14em;}

.toolbar {text-align:right; font-size:.9em;}

.tiddler {padding:1em 1em 0em 1em;}

.missing .viewer,.missing .title {font-style:italic;}

.title {font-size:1.6em; font-weight:bold;}

.missing .subtitle {display:none;}
.subtitle {font-size:1.1em;}

.tiddler .button {padding:0.2em 0.4em;}

.tagging {margin:0.5em 0.5em 0.5em 0; float:left; display:none;}
.isTag .tagging {display:block;}
.tagged {margin:0.5em; float:right;}
.tagging, .tagged {font-size:0.9em; padding:0.25em;}
.tagging ul, .tagged ul {list-style:none; margin:0.25em; padding:0;}
.tagClear {clear:both;}

.footer {font-size:.9em;}
.footer li {display:inline;}

.annotation {padding:0.5em; margin:0.5em;}

* html .viewer pre {width:99%; padding:0 0 1em 0;}
.viewer {line-height:1.4em; padding-top:0.5em;}
.viewer .button {margin:0em 0.25em; padding:0em 0.25em;}
.viewer blockquote {line-height:1.5em; padding-left:0.8em;margin-left:2.5em;}
.viewer ul, .viewer ol {margin-left:0.5em; padding-left:1.5em;}

.viewer table, table.twtable {border-collapse:collapse; margin:0.8em 1.0em;}
.viewer th, .viewer td, .viewer tr,.viewer caption,.twtable th, .twtable td, .twtable tr,.twtable caption {padding:3px;}
table.listView {font-size:0.85em; margin:0.8em 1.0em;}
table.listView th, table.listView td, table.listView tr {padding:0px 3px 0px 3px;}

.viewer pre {padding:0.5em; margin-left:0.5em; font-size:1.2em; line-height:1.4em; overflow:auto;}
.viewer code {font-size:1.2em; line-height:1.4em;}

.editor {font-size:1.1em;}
.editor input, .editor textarea {display:block; width:100%; font:inherit;}
.editorFooter {padding:0.25em 0em; font-size:.9em;}
.editorFooter .button {padding-top:0px; padding-bottom:0px;}

.fieldsetFix {border:0; padding:0; margin:1px 0px 1px 0px;}

.sparkline {line-height:1em;}
.sparktick {outline:0;}

.zoomer {font-size:1.1em; position:absolute; overflow:hidden;}
.zoomer div {padding:1em;}

* html #backstage {width:99%;}
* html #backstageArea {width:99%;}
#backstageArea {display:none; position:relative; overflow: hidden; z-index:150; padding:0.3em 0.5em 0.3em 0.5em;}
#backstageToolbar {position:relative;}
#backstageArea a {font-weight:bold; margin-left:0.5em; padding:0.3em 0.5em 0.3em 0.5em;}
#backstageButton {display:none; position:absolute; z-index:175; top:0em; right:0em;}
#backstageButton a {padding:0.1em 0.4em 0.1em 0.4em; margin:0.1em 0.1em 0.1em 0.1em;}
#backstage {position:relative; width:100%; z-index:50;}
#backstagePanel {display:none; z-index:100; position:absolute; margin:0em 3em 0em 3em; padding:1em 1em 1em 1em;}
.backstagePanelFooter {padding-top:0.2em; float:right;}
.backstagePanelFooter a {padding:0.2em 0.4em 0.2em 0.4em;}
#backstageCloak {display:none; z-index:20; position:absolute; width:100%; height:100px;}

.whenBackstage {display:none;}
.backstageVisible .whenBackstage {display:block;}
/*}}}*/
/***
StyleSheet for use when a translation requires any css style changes.
This StyleSheet can be used directly by languages such as Chinese, Japanese and Korean which use a logographic writing system and need larger font sizes.
***/

/*{{{*/
body {font-size:0.8em;}

#sidebarOptions {font-size:1.05em;}
#sidebarOptions a {font-style:normal;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel {font-size:0.95em;}

.subtitle {font-size:0.8em;}

.viewer table.listView {font-size:0.95em;}

.htmlarea .toolbarHA table {border:1px solid ButtonFace; margin:0em 0em;}
/*}}}*/
/*{{{*/
@media print {
#mainMenu, #sidebar, #messageArea, .toolbar, #backstageButton, #backstageArea {display: none ! important;}
#displayArea {margin: 1em 1em 0em 1em;}
/* Fixes a feature in Firefox 1.5.0.2 where print preview displays the noscript content */
noscript {display:none;}
}
/*}}}*/
<!--{{{-->
<div class='header' macro='gradient vert [[ColorPalette::PrimaryLight]] [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]'>
<div class='headerShadow'>
<span class='siteTitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteTitle'></span>&nbsp;
<span class='siteSubtitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteSubtitle'></span>
</div>
<div class='headerForeground'>
<span class='siteTitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteTitle'></span>&nbsp;
<span class='siteSubtitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteSubtitle'></span>
</div>
</div>
<div id='mainMenu' refresh='content' tiddler='MainMenu'></div>
<div id='sidebar'>
<div id='sidebarOptions' refresh='content' tiddler='SideBarOptions'></div>
<div id='sidebarTabs' refresh='content' force='true' tiddler='SideBarTabs'></div>
</div>
<div id='displayArea'>
<div id='messageArea'></div>
<div id='tiddlerDisplay'></div>
</div>
<!--}}}-->
<!--{{{-->
<div class='toolbar' macro='toolbar closeTiddler closeOthers +editTiddler > fields syncing permalink references jump'></div>
<div class='title' macro='view title'></div>
<div class='subtitle'><span macro='view modifier link'></span>, <span macro='view modified date'></span> (<span macro='message views.wikified.createdPrompt'></span> <span macro='view created date'></span>)</div>
<div class='tagging' macro='tagging'></div>
<div class='tagged' macro='tags'></div>
<div class='viewer' macro='view text wikified'></div>
<div class='tagClear'></div>
<!--}}}-->
<!--{{{-->
<div class='toolbar' macro='toolbar +saveTiddler -cancelTiddler deleteTiddler'></div>
<div class='title' macro='view title'></div>
<div class='editor' macro='edit title'></div>
<div macro='annotations'></div>
<div class='editor' macro='edit text'></div>
<div class='editor' macro='edit tags'></div><div class='editorFooter'><span macro='message views.editor.tagPrompt'></span><span macro='tagChooser'></span></div>
<!--}}}-->
To get started with this blank TiddlyWiki, you'll need to modify the following tiddlers:
* SiteTitle & SiteSubtitle: The title and subtitle of the site, as shown above (after saving, they will also appear in the browser title bar)
* MainMenu: The menu (usually on the left)
* DefaultTiddlers: Contains the names of the tiddlers that you want to appear when the TiddlyWiki is opened
You'll also need to enter your username for signing your edits: <<option txtUserName>>
These InterfaceOptions for customising TiddlyWiki are saved in your browser

Your username for signing your edits. Write it as a WikiWord (eg JoeBloggs)

<<option txtUserName>>
<<option chkSaveBackups>> SaveBackups
<<option chkAutoSave>> AutoSave
<<option chkRegExpSearch>> RegExpSearch
<<option chkCaseSensitiveSearch>> CaseSensitiveSearch
<<option chkAnimate>> EnableAnimations

----
Also see AdvancedOptions
Type the text for '(built-in shadow tiddler)'
<html>Played some more with the<span style="font-weight: bold;"> TW</span>. One day I'll get down to some <span style="font-style: italic;">real work.<br></span>Note my great editing format, that's where chasing plugins helps. You scratch the surface and want more.<span style="font-style: italic;"><br></span></html>
<<haloscan comments>>
Settled down in Tiddlyville. Having a  few issues but I'm becoming a master of my domain.TiddlyWiki is so forgiving and fun to play with.
<html><span style="font-weight: bold;">My IT hacks &amp; WITB<br></span><ul><li>Use TiddlyWiki a to archive all my notes, references, and works in progress as well.</li><li>Use TiddlyWiki as a scrapbook<br></li><li>Run my data base from a usb thumb drive<br></li><li>Begin again -- LOR as <span style="font-style: italic;">The Blather</span><br></li><li>Routinize RRN<br></li><li>Socialism/Climate class series<br></li></ul></html>
Begin to play with Tiddly Wiki and it's so lateral.
Learnt a bit about how to do it.
Saved my work to usb stick 
Working more and more at the TiddlyWiki coal face.I'll never be able to explain this to anyone.
Still working on the Tiddly. Makes for insomnia amusement.Another late night
<html>Fiddled some more. Discovered that you can copy and paste a whole lot of multimedia flash stuff.<br><br style="font-style: italic;"><span style="font-style: italic;">Thinks....<br></span><ol><li>Create web presentations on any number of themes.</li><li>Build TiddlyWiki into everyday use.</li><li>Study the theory and compare TiddlyWiki with wiki'ing</li><li>And note the differences...<br></li></ol></html>
<html><span style="font-weight: bold;">Notes on using TW for research for writing<br></span><ul><li>Easy to grab and publish annotated and reference material from anywhere on the web with TiddlySnip</li><li>Easy to keep that material in one place</li><li>Easy to search that material although you get other non relevant tiddlers if you do.</li><li>If you concentrate the material down to dense notes you can treat taht as an easily searched web page -- easier to search than a document in WORD or Open Office.</li><li>Is it preferable&nbsp; hard to write the article draft&nbsp; in TW itself or do it on a word processor?<br></li></ul></html>
Got myself a Toshiba  USB thumb stick which as has 4 GB a capacity and will use that to run TiddlyWiki and a lot more  - such as podcatcher.

I may add Audacity with out and about editing and I'm wondering about Firefox....
Australian Broadcasting Corporation

TV PROGRAM TRANSCRIPT

LOCATION: http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2006/s1581704.htm

Broadcast: 01/03/2006
ABC Learning faces court battle

Reporter: Natasha Johnson

KERRY O'BRIEN, 7.30 REPORT PRESENTER: ABC Learning, the world's biggest publicly listed childcare provider, has been a corporate phenomenon in recent years, expanding at a rapid rate. On Monday, it posted a half-year profit on $38 million and is driving hard to improve on that bottom line while it continues to pursue growth. Tomorrow, the company is going to court in Melbourne to argue that it was not responsible when a two-year-old managed to get out of one of its childcare centres. Instead, the ABC will claim the responsibility rests with the employees who were on duty at the time. Childcare workers are watching the case with trepidation fearing it may set a precedent that will leave them holding the baby in every sense. Natasha Johnson reports.

NATASHA JOHNSON, 7.30 REPORT REPORTER: They are the big kids in the child care industry - a $2.3 billion corporation. But in the same week ABC Learning Centres announced a doubling of its half-year profit, it's launching legal action in the Victorian Supreme Court over a $200 fine.

JOHN HOWE, MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL: This is not just about a $200 fine. ABC is trying to set a precedent, which will have enormous implications for the child care industry. If not, just in Victoria, but nationally.

BARBARA ROMERIL, COMMUNITY CHILD CARE ASSOCIATION: What ABC is saying is, "We own and operate those services, but don't blame us if our most junior child care worker does the wrong thing, that's not our fault".

ANN YOUNG, CHILD CARE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION: ABC are to be congratulated. It's about time somebody stood up and said, "No".

ADVERTISEMENT: And you'll find we constantly upgrade our facilities securing a safe environment for your child.

NATASHA JOHNSON: In what's being seen as a test case, the legal challenge stems from an incident at this ABC centre on the outskirts of Melbourne. Three years ago, a 2-year-old boy climbed the fence and wandered off for 10 minutes before being found by neighbours. While a magistrate found that two staff members failed to adequately supervise, it was the company that copped the blame under Victorian regulations and it's now appealing that decision.

JOHN HOWE: It's hard to know what their chances of winning are, but they obviously think it is worth while trying because of the implications of success - of them successfully arguing that "we weren't responsible, it was the employees who are responsible", because that gets them off the hook. It means they are likely to be off the hook if future events happen where children escape or are injured.

CAROLYN WALLIS, CHILD CARE WORKER: It is concerning me that this is where it is heading. That it's just going to be finger pointing and I really don't want the finger to be pointed at me.

NATASHA JOHNSON: Carolyn Wallis and Frances Raffaut work for a not-for-profit centre in East Melbourne. They say they accept a degree of personal responsibility, but fear a shift in the balance would be unfair, considering they are amongst the lowest paid workers in the country.

FRANCIS RAFFAUT, CHILD CARE WORKER: I don't think I'd be able to afford to go to court. I don't personally have the resources to get that together to face the issue.

CAROLYN WALLIS: I mean, I don't really understand. Are we going to have to get personal liability insurance? It's get lots and lots of consequences for us as individuals. It's quite a stressful job and I'd have to question whether or not I wanted to be in this industry.

BRIAN DALEY, MISCELLANEOUS WORKERS UNION: It's got huge implications for the workplace in general. Workplaces are set up where the employer takes responsibility for the issues that occur in the workplace, provided the worker is exercising reasonable responsibility and care. Now, if that dictum changes, then what it means is that any worker who is in a position where they exercise care, be it a nurse, be it a teacher, be it a security guard, all of those sorts of occupations could be subject to responsibility cases under this sort of a decision.

JOHN HOWE: The department had the option of prosecuting individual employees, but clearly what the department's role is, is to maintain standards in the industry and the best way to do that is to hold the companies that run these centres accountable.

ADVERTISEMENT: ABC Learning Centres are looking for motivated people to join our child care team.

NATASHA JOHNSON: ABC wouldn't comment while the case is before the court, but Childcare National, a body representing 1,000 private and community services, supports the argument that if operators have done everything they are required to, they shouldn't be punished for the failings of an employee.

ANN YOUNG: The owner is responsible for employing the qualified and correct staff. They say, "Yes, I've had this years of experience and I've got this degree and that qualification." So I employ you. Then all of a sudden the wheel falls off the trolley and it is my fault because I'm the proprietor.

BARBARA ROMERIL: Of course there are situations where an individual staff member should be held liable if they've done something illegal or deliberately and maliciously breached the regulations. But their employer is also responsible. When a child leaves their child in a childcare centre, they don't have a contract with the employee. Their contract is with the owner who's offering that service in the community.

NATASHA JOHNSON: ABC is also running a second legal challenge to regulations over incidents at two other Victorian centres. Child Care National is cheering from the sidelines as the corporate giant with 20% market share takes up a fight that's been difficult for smaller individual owners to mount.

ANN YOUNG: In Victoria, they are very quick and very deadly to take you before a magistrate who has no idea about the child care industry. I don't think of anyone in the world that is responsible for their employees for every minute of every second of every day.

NATASHA JOHNSON: But Barbara Romeril, who represents not-for-profit community centres, is alarmed at what she sees as a changing culture in child care and is urging Governments to rewrite the law should ABC win in court.

BARBARA ROMERIL: The child care industry is fundamentally different to other industries like manufacturing or IT. Child care is about our most vulnerable and fragile community members - babies, toddlers and young children. It's far too fragile a service to submit it to the harsh realities of the commercial world.

NATASHA JOHNSON: Irrespective of the outcome of tomorrow's case, ABC is dealing with a new investigation at the same centre over another child that went missing last month.

Home    Archive    About Us    Letters

Source: [[7.30 Report - 01/03/2006: ABC Learning faces court battle|http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2006/s1581704.htm]]
<<tagCloud>>
<html><h1 class="firstHeading">ABC Learning</h1>
		
			<h3 id="siteSub">From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia</h3>
			
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<tbody><tr>
<th class="fn n org" style="text-align: center; font-size: 120%;" colspan="2">ABC Learning Centres</th>
</tr>
<tr class="note">
<th style="text-align: right; padding-right: 0.75em;"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Types_of_companies" title="Category:Types of companies">Type</a></th>
<td><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_company" title="Public company">Public</a> (<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Securities_Exchange" title="Australian Securities Exchange">ASX</a>: <span class="plainlinks"><a href="http://www.asx.com.au/asx/research/CompanyInfoSearchResults.jsp?searchBy=asxCode&amp;allinfo=on&amp;asxCode=ABS&amp;companyName=&amp;principalActivity=&amp;industryGroup=NO" class="external text" title="http://www.asx.com.au/asx/research/CompanyInfoSearchResults.jsp?searchBy=asxCode&amp;allinfo=on&amp;asxCode=ABS&amp;companyName=&amp;principalActivity=&amp;industryGroup=NO" rel="nofollow">ABS</a></span>)</td>
</tr>
<tr class="note">
<th style="text-align: right; padding-right: 0.75em;">Founded</th>
<td><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1988" title="1988">1988</a></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<th style="text-align: right; padding-right: 0.75em;">Headquarters</th>
<td class="adr"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brisbane" title="Brisbane">Brisbane</a>, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia" title="Australia">Australia</a></td>
</tr>
<tr class="note">
<th style="text-align: right; padding-right: 0.75em;">Key&nbsp;people</th>
<td><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddy_Groves" title="Eddy Groves">Eddy Groves</a>, CEO</td>
</tr>
<tr class="note">
<th style="text-align: right; padding-right: 0.75em;"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industry" title="Industry">Industry</a></th>
<td><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_care" class="mw-redirect" title="Child care">Child care</a></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<th style="text-align: right; padding-right: 0.75em;"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Website" title="Website">Website</a></th>
<td class="url"><a href="http://www.childcare.com.au" class="external free" title="http://www.childcare.com.au" rel="nofollow">http://www.childcare.com.au</a></td>
</tr>
</tbody></table>
<p><b>ABC Learning Centres</b> (<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Securities_Exchange" title="Australian Securities Exchange">ASX</a>: <span class="plainlinks"><a href="http://www.asx.com.au/asx/research/CompanyInfoSearchResults.jsp?searchBy=asxCode&amp;allinfo=on&amp;asxCode=ABS&amp;companyName=&amp;principalActivity=&amp;industryGroup=NO" class="external text" title="http://www.asx.com.au/asx/research/CompanyInfoSearchResults.jsp?searchBy=asxCode&amp;allinfo=on&amp;asxCode=ABS&amp;companyName=&amp;principalActivity=&amp;industryGroup=NO" rel="nofollow">ABS</a></span>) is an <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia" title="Australia">Australian</a> company that is the world's largest provider of <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day_care" title="Day care">childcare</a> services. It is listed on the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Stock_Exchange" class="mw-redirect" title="Australian Stock Exchange">Australian Stock Exchange</a> with its market capitalisation reaching <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_dollar" title="Australian dollar">AUD$</a>2.5
billion in March 2006. The company is currently undergoing difficulties
due to events surrounding an unexpected profit downgrade.</p>
<table id="toc" class="toc" summary="Contents">
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<h2>Contents</h2>
 <span class="toctoggle">[<a href="javascript:toggleToc()" class="internal" id="togglelink">hide</a>]</span></div>
<ul><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#History"><span class="tocnumber">1</span> <span class="toctext">History</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#Controversy_and_criticisms"><span class="tocnumber">2</span> <span class="toctext">Controversy and criticisms</span></a>
<ul><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#Forced_share_sales"><span class="tocnumber">2.1</span> <span class="toctext">Forced share sales</span></a></li></ul>
</li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#Notes"><span class="tocnumber">3</span> <span class="toctext">Notes</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#External_links"><span class="tocnumber">4</span> <span class="toctext">External links</span></a></li></ul>
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<p><a name="History" id="History"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=ABC_Learning&amp;action=edit&amp;section=1" title="Edit section: History">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">History</span></h2>
<p>ABC Learning was founded in 1988 in Ashgrove, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brisbane%2C_Queensland" class="mw-redirect" title="Brisbane, Queensland">Brisbane, Queensland</a> by <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddy_Groves" title="Eddy Groves">Eddy Groves</a>,
now the Global Chief Executive Officer of the company. Co-founder Le
Neve Groves, is a senior executive and is also a major shareholder in
ABC. The husband and wife jointly own 14.5% of the company. ABC rapidly
expanded, reaching 43 childcare centres by <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_30" title="June 30">June 30</a>, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2001" title="2001">2001</a>.
By November 2005, it had 697 childcare centres throughout Australia and
New Zealand. In March 2006, it forecast that would have 950 centres in
Australia and New Zealand by <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_30" title="June 30">June 30</a>, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006" title="2006">2006</a>.</p>
<p>It has purchased the third largest childcare operator in the United
States Learning Care Group Inc. which itself operates 467 centres in
the US and other educational facilities in south-east Asia. The
purchase provides the ABC Learning with 70,000 additional licensed
childcare places in addition to the 50,000 it had previously. Other
mergers with Pepercorn Management Group and the purchase of Child Care
Centres Australia helped provide a considerable increase in the number
of ABC's centres. The company plans to increases its number of centres
by four a week.<sup id="_ref-0" class="reference"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_note-0" title="">[1]</a></sup> In March 2006, it announced a bid for Kids Campus, one of its few remaining large competitors in Australia<sup id="_ref-1" class="reference"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_note-1" title="">[2]</a></sup> which would give it another 106 centres.<sup id="_ref-2" class="reference"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_note-2" title="">[3]</a></sup></p>
<p>On <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_13" title="December 13">December 13</a>, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006" title="2006">2006</a> it was announced that ABC would acquire the second largest child care provider in the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States" title="United States">United States</a>, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago" title="Chicago">Chicago</a> based <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Petite_Academy" title="La Petite Academy">La Petite Academy</a> for 330 million US Dollars as well as the 5th largest provider in the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UK" class="mw-redirect" title="UK">UK</a>,
Busy Bees Group, Ltd. With these acquisitions they are expanding into
the UK market and increasing their market share in the US to 1%.<sup id="_ref-3" class="reference"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_note-3" title="">[4]</a></sup></p>
<p>It has expanded aggressively into the outsourcing of child care
services, negotiating deals with some of Australia's largest employers
including the Australian <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Department_of_Defence_%28Australia%29" title="Department of Defence (Australia)">Department of Defence</a>
which involved taking over the Department's nineteen childcare
facilities. Aside from offshore expansion, the company is also
expanding in training and education. It runs the ABC Early Childhood
Training College, providing training for childcare workers, publishes a
magazine <i>Small Wonders</i> aimed at parents with young children.</p>
<p>It is a highly profitable company, in the FY2004/5 recording net
profit after tax of $52.3 million on total revenues of $292.7 million.
The six months ending <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_31" title="December 31">31 December</a> <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2005" title="2005">2005</a>
showed no slowing in the financial momentum for the company with profit
after tax reaching $38 million and revenues of $219.8 million.</p>
<p>ABC Learning is the major sponsor of the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_36ers" title="Adelaide 36ers">Adelaide 36ers</a> in the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Basketball_League_%28Australia%29" title="National Basketball League (Australia)">NBL</a>.</p>
<p><a name="Controversy_and_criticisms" id="Controversy_and_criticisms"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=ABC_Learning&amp;action=edit&amp;section=2" title="Edit section: Controversy and criticisms">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Controversy and criticisms</span></h2>
<p>Critics of ABC Learning say it is making these considerable profits
at the expense of Australian taxpayers whose money subsidises the use
of childcare with means-tested tax rebates. ABC Learning received $128
million of its revenue from government subsidies in the last financial
year.</p>
<p>There is also controversy about the dramatic expansion of the
company with claims that in some areas ABC - by acquisition - has
achieved a monopoly in the provision of childcare services. The <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Competition_and_Consumer_Commission" title="Australian Competition and Consumer Commission">Australian Competition and Consumer Commission</a>
reviewed the company's acquisition of Peppercorn and permitted the deal
to go ahead after imposing certain conditions including a requirement
to close centres in some areas and agreeing not to purchase in other
areas.</p>
<p>ABC Learning is also using its considerable financial resources to
support challenges to regulations governing childcare and enforcing <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vicarious_liability" title="Vicarious liability">vicarious liability</a>
on the company. In one case, in 2006 it challenged a $200 fine imposed
by a Victorian Magistrate for the actions of its staff who failed to
adequately supervise a two-year old child who escaped from a centre in
suburban Melbourne and was found by a neighbour and brought back to the
centre. It argued that the company had done all it could reasonably be
expected to do to provide facilities that made escape difficult and
that any legal liability should rest with the staff involved.</p>
<p>In August 2006 ABC Learning pleaded guilty to 'Failing to Enclose'
in the Fremantle Magistrates Court and were fined $1300. A three-year
old boy escaped from the centre in Lynwood, Western Australia, through
a broken fence and was found by staff in a nearby car park. <sup id="_ref-4" class="reference"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_note-4" title="">[5]</a></sup></p>
<p><a name="Forced_share_sales" id="Forced_share_sales"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=ABC_Learning&amp;action=edit&amp;section=3" title="Edit section: Forced share sales">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Forced share sales</span></h3>
<p>An unexpected drop of 42 per cent in profit in the second half of
2007 to $37.1 million and adverse market rumors about its $1.8 billion
debt triggered a decline in the company's share price. Several
directors of the company were then forced to dump millions of shares
after receiving <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margin_call" class="mw-redirect" title="Margin call">margin calls</a>. The combined effects caused the share price to plummet 43% to $2.15 after trading as low as $0.15. <sup id="_ref-5" class="reference"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_note-5" title="">[6]</a></sup></p>
<p>The timing of the share dumps have raised questions about <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insider_trading" title="Insider trading">insider trading</a>.<sup id="_ref-6" class="reference"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_note-6" title="">[7]</a></sup></p>
<p><a name="Notes" id="Notes"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=ABC_Learning&amp;action=edit&amp;section=4" title="Edit section: Notes">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Notes</span></h2>
<ol class="references"><li id="_note-0"><b><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_ref-0" title="">^</a></b> <a href="http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/cradle-snatcher/2006/03/10/1141701698670.html" class="external text" title="http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/cradle-snatcher/2006/03/10/1141701698670.html" rel="nofollow">Cradle snatcher - National - smh.com.au</a></li><li id="_note-1"><b><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_ref-1" title="">^</a></b> <a href="http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,18456794%255E2702,00.html" class="external free" title="http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,18456794%255E2702,00.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,18456794%255E2702,00.html</a></li><li id="_note-2"><b><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_ref-2" title="">^</a></b> <a href="http://www2.shawstockbroking.com.au/egoli/egoliNewsViewsPage.asp?PageID=%7BB490E9C4-2490-4B5A-965D-3263B359F3E7%7D" class="external free" title="http://www2.shawstockbroking.com.au/egoli/egoliNewsViewsPage.asp?PageID={B490E9C4-2490-4B5A-965D-3263B359F3E7}" rel="nofollow">http://www2.shawstockbroking.com.au/egoli/egoliNewsViewsPage.asp?PageID={B490E9C4-2490-4B5A-965D-3263B359F3E7}</a></li><li id="_note-3"><b><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_ref-3" title="">^</a></b> <a href="http://uk.biz.yahoo.com/13122006/240/abc-buys-la-petite-academy-and-busy-bees.html" class="external free" title="http://uk.biz.yahoo.com/13122006/240/abc-buys-la-petite-academy-and-busy-bees.html" rel="nofollow">http://uk.biz.yahoo.com/13122006/240/abc-buys-la-petite-academy-and-busy-bees.html</a></li><li id="_note-4"><b><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_ref-4" title="">^</a></b> <a href="http://www.abcsport.net.au/news/stories/2006/08/04/1706685.htm" class="external text" title="http://www.abcsport.net.au/news/stories/2006/08/04/1706685.htm" rel="nofollow">Childcare centre fined for boy's escape</a> (<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006" title="2006">2006</a>-<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_4" title="August 4">08-04</a>). Retrieved on <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008" title="2008">2008</a>-<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/February_29" title="February 29">02-29</a>.</li><li id="_note-5"><b><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_ref-5" title="">^</a></b> <a href="http://business.smh.com.au/eddy-faces-annihilation-as-abc-board-caught-by-margin-calls/20080227-1v5b.html" class="external text" title="http://business.smh.com.au/eddy-faces-annihilation-as-abc-board-caught-by-margin-calls/20080227-1v5b.html" rel="nofollow">Eddy faces annihilation as ABC board caught by margin calls</a>. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sydney_Morning_Herald" class="mw-redirect" title="Sydney Morning Herald">Sydney Morning Herald</a> (<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008" title="2008">2008</a>-<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/February_27" title="February 27">02-27</a>). Retrieved on <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008" title="2008">2008</a>-<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/February_28" title="February 28">02-28</a>.</li><li id="_note-6"><b><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_ref-6" title="">^</a></b> <a href="http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,23288367-2702,00.html" class="external text" title="http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,23288367-2702,00.html" rel="nofollow">ABC crisis forces $50m stock dump</a>. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Australian" title="The Australian">The Australian</a> (<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008" title="2008">2008</a>-<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/February_28" title="February 28">02-28</a>). Retrieved on <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008" title="2008">2008</a>-<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/February_28" title="February 28">02-28</a>.</li></ol></html>
<html><span style="font-weight: bold;"></span><span style="font-weight: bold;"><br></span><hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;"><h1><span style="font-weight: bold;">TIMELINE:</span></h1><br style="font-weight: bold;"><span style="font-weight: bold;">Growth </span><br>1988&nbsp;&nbsp; <br>2001&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 43 centres<br>Nov 2005&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 697 centres (Aus &amp; NZ)<br>Mar 2008&nbsp; 950 centres ( forcast Aust &amp; NZ)<br>2300 childcare centres with $2 billion of borrowing.<br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Profits<br><br></span> FY2004/5 recording net profit after tax of $52.3 million on total revenues of $292.7 million. <br><span style="font-weight: bold;">The six months ending 31 December 2005 </span>showed
no slowing in the financial momentum for the company with profit after
tax reaching $38 million and revenues of $219.8 million.
ABC Learning received $128 million of its revenue from government
subsidies in the last financial year.<br><span style="font-weight: bold;"><br></span><br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Expansion:<br></span>In 2001 he floated it on the
stock market. At that stage he owned 31 childcare centres in South East
Queensland. Now, just three years later, he’s got 750 right across
Australia.<br><span style="font-weight: bold;"><br></span><span style="font-weight: bold;">On December 13, 2006 i</span>t was
announced that ABC would acquire the second largest child care provider
in the United States, Chicago based La Petite Academy for 330 million
US Dollars as well as the 5th largest provider in the UK, Busy Bees
Group, Ltd. With these acquisitions they are expanding into the UK
market and increasing their market share in the US to 1%<br><br> a recent presentation to sharemarket investors Mr Groves said ABC was
on target to increase the number of its centres in Australia and New
Zealand from 660 in the middle of last year to 850 by the end of June.
The company has more than tripled the number of its centres in three
years.<br><br>ABC News 9/9/04:Alan Kohler: Most of the action on the share market today was in the
childcare business. The three biggest listed operators of crèches, ABC
Learning Centres, Childcare Centres of Australia and Peppercorn
Management, announced a three-way merger with ABC on top<br><br>Source: <a target="_blank" title="External link to http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,23288077-20142,00.html" href="http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,23288077-20142,00.html" class="externalLink">Childcare business spoonfed : The Australian</a><br>
n June last year, ABC reported owning 1188 centres across Australia and
New Zealand and 35 owned and 12 managed nurseries in Britain. In recent
months it has expanded its interests in the US and now owns 1015
centres to become that country's second-biggest provider. While figures
are hard to pin down, ABC's estimated control of the overall market in
Australia ranges between 20 and 30 per cent across the board, and in
some regions such as Victoria is understood to be even higher.<br><br>
It has snapped up three rival sharemarket-listed
child-care operators since late-2003, and in November last year spent
$218 million buying the third-largest operator in the US, the Learning
Care Group.<br style="text-decoration: underline;"><hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px; text-decoration: underline;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">An unexpected drop of 42 per cent in profit in the second half of
2007 to $37.1 million and adverse market rumors about its $1.8 billion
debt triggered a decline in the company's share price. Several
directors of the company were then forced to dump millions of shares
after receiving <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margin_call" class="mw-redirect" title="Margin call">margin calls</a>. The combined effects caused the share price to plummet 43% to $2.15 after trading as low as $0.15. <sup id="_ref-5" class="reference"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_note-5" title="">[6]</a><br><br><br><br></sup></span><h1><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><sup id="_ref-5" class="reference">Financial coallpse</sup></span></h1>The recent history of Child Care Centres Australia provides a salutary
insight. Caroline Fewster is an Associate Professor in Early Childhood
at Bond University on the Gold Coast. She was also a board member of
Child Care Centres Australia, a board that was chaired by Liberal party
figure, Andrew Peacock.<br>
<br>
CCCA was heading down a similar path to
ABC Learning Centres. It had floated on the stockmarket with the help
of Andrew Peacock’s son-in-law and prominent Liberal, Michael Kroger.
The company was rapidly expanding when it acquired 41 centres in
Western Australia.<br>
<br>
The company hadn’t done its sums properly
though, overestimating its profits by almost 90%. The whole thing went
belly-up and shares were suspended from trading.<br><br><br>
ABC Learning's half-year earnings have dropped by 42 per cent to
$37.1 million, prompting investor concerns about the company's debt
structure.<br>
<br>
At one stage today, shares dropped 70 per cent to touch a six-year low of $1.15, but have closed at $2.14.<br>
<br>
The company, which has been in a massive expansion phase in the past
two years, has a negative balance of hard physical assets to intangible
assets to the tune of $1.75 per share.<br>
<br>
The company also has $1.2 billion of debt repayable in three years, and $600 million of convertible notes on a nine-year term.<br>
<br><hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;"><br><h1><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span></h1><h1><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><sup id="_ref-5" class="reference">ABC SHARE COLLAPSE</sup></span></h1><h1><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span></h1>After amassing a $270 million personal fortune by the age of 40,
Eddy Groves lost $45 million in just two hours on Tuesday morning.<br>
Sadly for them, Eddy can be a hard man to track down. His preferred mode of transport is a private Citation <a tiddlylink="CJ3" refresh="link" class="tiddlyLink tiddlyLinkNonExisting" title="The tiddler 'CJ3' doesn't yet exist" href="javascript:;">CJ3</a> jet, which means he can whip in and out of Australia's airports at will.<br><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><sup id="_ref-5" class="reference"><br></sup></span><hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;"><h1><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><sup id="_ref-5" class="reference">ISSUES</sup></span></h1><span style="font-weight: bold;">1998</span><br>Lyn Wannan is the Convenor of the National Association of Community Centres.<br>
Lyn Wannan: I mean we know right now that Government policy is for no
growth in the community-based sector and for still some considerable
growth in the private sector. My view is that we need to retain a
community service sector, a non-profit community-owned sector. I think
that has to be a priority of government. I fear the loss of it
altogether. It has been the community-based sector which has fought
hard for the quality standards and regulations, and it has been the
community-based sector which has actually set the price in the past.<br>The push for regulations at that time was led by pre-school
associations, worried about the standard of informal care. Today an
estimated 180,000 children under the age of five are being looked after
in home-based, informal care. These are the everyday babysitting
arrangements made between families and friends, as well as the
money-making neighbourhood ventures. But not to be confused with Family
Day Care, which is a government-funded and licensed home-based scheme.<br><br><h1><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span></h1><span style="font-weight: bold; text-decoration: underline;"></span>Gerald Tooth: The once cottage industry of childcare, run by
not-for-profit organisations and small private operators, is being
rapidly corporatised. That is, large stock market listed companies have
flooded into the sector which they see as a goldmine of profit
opportunity. It might be good news for you, if you’re an investor, but
is it good news for you and your children if you’re a parent?<br><br><br>There are around four-and-a-half-thousand day care centres across
Australia. Traditionally the sector was dominated by small-scale
operators, community run not-for-profit organisations and small
privately-run centres.<br><br>But in 1997 the Howard Government
scrapped direct subsidies to not-for-profit childcare centres and in a
single stroke, childcare was changed. Where around 40% of government
funding had gone directly to centres, now all of it went to parents
through Child Care Benefit payments, that they pass on to the centre of
their choice. With access to a new funding stream, private centres
boomed and with the not-for-profits decimated, childcare was opened up
as a lucrative field for profit making.<br><br>Seven years later, the
government has more than doubled its childcare spend and the childcare
sector is now seen as an industry, a multi-billion dollars industry.
And it’s the new corporate players that dominate, with their
shareholder backing, management systems and economies of scale. And
it’s all happened in the mere blink of an eye.<br>
<br>
ABC Learning
Centres led the way as the first to list on the Stock Exchange just
three years ago in 2001. Others quickly followed: Child Care Centres
Australia, <a tiddlylink="FutureOne" refresh="link" class="tiddlyLink tiddlyLinkNonExisting" title="The tiddler 'FutureOne' doesn't yet exist" href="javascript:;">FutureOne</a>, Peppercorn Management Group and Hutchison’s Childcare services,<br>
<br>
With
the recent merger of ABC Learning Centres, Peppercorn and Child Care
Centres Australia, Eddy Groves’ company will now control 750 centres.
And as he said earlier, he reckons the company will soon be worth a
billion dollars.<br><br>Pam Cahir of Early Childhood Australia.<br>
<br>
Pam Cahir: What’s
happening in childcare services is happening in all childcare services
right now, that is, you can’t get staff, you certainly can’t get
qualified staff, you can get casual staff, the turnover of staff is
enormous, and there are major issues around the training of staff that
we’re getting. And staff are poorly paid, the conditions are awful,
there is no career path in the sector, and so there are a lot of
fundamentals to get right before you start worrying about who’s
actually providing the care. In my view now, I don’t think it’s
appropriate or OK for parents to go to work on the back of the wages of
poorly paid staff in childcare services, I don’t think it’s OK for
services to have ratios of one to five for babies. I mean I can’t
imagine looking after five babies, I just think that’s just an
impossible task, and if you had quadruplets in this country you’d get
support. So there are some quite fundamental things that you have to
get right in order for us to actually set this sector OK.<br><br>Childcare workers are currently battling in the Industrial Relations
Courts in Victoria, South Australia and the ACT for wage rises. The
childcare entrepreneurs are opposing them.<br>
If low wages are one pillar of the childcare business, government funding is the other.<br><br>As the use of childcare has skyrocketed in Australia, 80% of the
country’s four-year-olds are now spending some time in some form of
care each week, and she asks, do we want that care to be run by
well-trained professionals who can properly guide a child’s development
at that critical time.<br>
<br>
For example, the ratio of carers to children in babies’ rooms in New
South Wales is one to five. In Queensland it’s one to four. Group
leaders in Queensland must be two-year trained, in New South Wales,
three year trained.<br><br>oy Goodfellow is an early childhood expert at Macquarie University. She
recently wrote a paper titled ‘Is the marketplace influencing our view
of the child?’ which focused on the shift in who is seen as ‘the
consumer’ of childcare services. Once it was the child, now apparently,
it’s the parent.<br>
<br>
Joy Goodfellow is concerned that profit-driven
childcare services have lost sight of just how critical it is for
children’s development to build consistent, long-term relationships
between children and childcare workers.<br>
<br>
Joy Goodfellow: So where
we have situations where an organisation is trying to cut its costs and
salaries are the high cost, for example, in a not-for-profit
organisation you could expect salary costs to be around 80% of their
total budget. The corporate sector and the two corporates that I’ve
looked at are Peppercorn and ABC Learning. They hope to keep their
budgets down under 50%. So the way you keep your salary budget down
under 50% is to think about the cost of staff in your centre. So you
might want to employ people who have lesser qualification if your
regulation allows you to do that. It might say you want to have higher
numbers of casual staff so that you can then put those staff off if you
don’t have the children there. It might mean that in a day you have
only maybe a small handful of children left in the afternoon, so you
say OK, we’ll group all those children together under this staff
member, and send the other staff member home. So there are things, or
practices that can occur that are I believe, detrimental to children
but they are undertaken in order to economise.<br><br><br>Wannan says that in the past 15 years the number of privately run
centres in Australia has risen from fewer than half the total to 70 per
cent, with many community centres closing or being taken over.<br>
<br>
This dismays Lynne Wannan, the convener of the National Association of <a tiddlylink="Community-Based" refresh="link" class="tiddlyLink tiddlyLinkNonExisting" title="The tiddler 'Community-Based' doesn't yet exist" href="javascript:;">Community-Based</a>
Children's Services, who has recently returned from a tour of Canada
campaigning to prevent an Australian-style "privatisation" of
child-care services there.<br><br><span style="text-decoration: underline;">"But instead
of increased competition, lower prices and improved quality, the
reverse has happened,</span>" she says. "It has led to a classic market
failure."<br><br><br>
In 1991, the Keating Labor Government introduced childcare subsidies
which were aimed at the creation of better funding levels for
children's services. While this did inject more funds into services, it
was also a signal to corporate opportunists to develop methods of
capitalising on these government subsidies and corporatising childcare.<br>
<br>
<br>
In 2000, the Coalition Government introduced the Child Care Benefit
scheme and, with a higher funding level for services, more
opportunities were created for private operators to achieve greater
profitability. While the benefits of the corporatisation of early
childhood education are debatable, these corporations have certainly
capitalised on childcare, through the float of their shares on the
Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) and an astronomical rise in their share
pricings.<br>
<br>
<br>
It has long been argued that privatisation and corporatised
competition drives the market towards creating cheaper and more
efficient services but, as history has shown, it can also sometimes
result in poorly-managed businesses and a decrease in the quality of
product and service. In the drive to create profits and to appease
shareholders, businesses can become unrealistically ambitious within
their markets and collapse in a spectacular fashion, as was the case
with HIH in Australia and Enron in the United States.<br>
<br>
<br>
According to Federal Government's figures, while the cost of a
typical childcare cost is $94.70 each week, a family pays only $33.10,
with the $61.60 being paid by the government directly to the service
provider. With over 60 per cent of all revenue for childcare centres
coming from government subsidies, this means that within these
corporatised services, shareholder profits are directly supported by
taxpayer funds. And it is this area which is of great concern to
community-based centres and to the general community. It also raises
the question of whether it is ethical for government funds to be
diverted into shareholder profits, or whether these funds should be
maintained for the quality care and education of young children and the
creation of better working conditions for childcare workers.<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<span style="font-weight: bold;"><br></span><br><hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;"><h1><hi>Child Care Workers</hi></h1><span style="font-style: italic;">NOTE : </span><span style="font-style: italic;" id="m_ucCompleteMessage18245_m_ucBasicMessage_m_lblTextValue">I
have a window into chilcare as my wife works in this field, Even with
level three qualificatons and 5 years experience at $19 per hour, the
pay is less than you can get as an uneducated worker in most fields.<br><br>MAY 2005:</span><span style="font-style: italic;">The Australian Industrial Relations Commission this week approved pay
rises of between $6 and $146 per week for the15,000-odd childcare
workers, whose current qualified pay rate is just $14 an hour<br><br>Fulltime childcare workers earn a pittance _ as little as $25,000 a year. So, why don’t we pay them m<br><br></span>After complaints in 2004 that ABC had been underpaying its staff and
forcing them to clean toilets and buy their own uniforms, the
Queensland branch of the union that represents child-care workers, the
Liquor, Hospitality and Miscellaneous Union, handed parents pamphlets
which Groves says portrayed him as "mean and greedy" and implied he was
"trying to drive down low wages of child-care workers to line his own
pockets".<br>
<br>
In an unprecedented action, Groves sued the union's
Queensland secretary, Ron Monaghan, for defamation. This has had the
extraordinary outcome that none of the union's officials contacted by
the Herald would risk commenting on the pay or conditions of ABC staff.<br>
<br>
The
union's officer responsible for child-care workers in NSW, Jim Lloyd,
said: "I am not able to comment on ABC at all." When asked whether this
was connected with the litigation in Queensland, he said: "Good
question."<br>
<br>
Even after the substantial rises granted this week, the minimum award
rate for a child-care worker with one year's experience is $611 a week.
However, ABC workers' pay cannot be independently verified because they
are required to sign confidential agreements. Groves has pointed out
that, in return, they are issued with 150 shares (currently worth
$1200) as a signing bonus - and he says he has a low staff turnover
rate of 8 per cent a year.<br>
_____________CRIKEY ____________<br><span style="font-weight: bold;"><br></span><hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;"><h1><span style="font-weight: bold;">GOv'T FUNDING</span></h1><br>
The
Federal Government already pours $1.7-billion a year into childcare
through the Child Care Benefit payments. ABC Learning Centre’s business
plan relies on these taxpayer dollars for 50% of its revenue.<br><br>Federal government child-care subsidies have provided the foundations on which ABC Learning was built.<br>
<br>
Indeed, Federal Government subsidies contributed about 45% to ABC Learning's Australian revenue last financial year.<br>
<br>
One of the planks of John Howard's election pitch was the Liberal Party's $687 million child-care plan.<br>
<br>
If
it won the election, the Coalition planned to pay the child-care rebate
directly to operators, instead of directly to parents, from April 1.
Directly to operators such as ABC Learning, which dominates the market.<br>
<br>
The
company's share price soared on that news - up from $5.52 before the
announcement to a high $6.28, before settling back to close at $5.99.<br><br><br>
According to an Australian Bureau of Statistics
survey, the cost of child care rose 10 per cent last year, and is up 62
per cent in the past four years. Some Sydney centres are charging $100
a day. In a bid to forestall this, when he announced a backdating of
the tax rebate in December 2004, the Treasurer, Peter Costello, warned
operators not to exploit the subsidy by increasing fees. Six months
later, ABC substantially increased its charges.<br>
<br>
he Federal Government pays parents a means-tested subsidy for each
child, ranging from $144 a week to $24.15 a week for parents earning
more than $95,683. In addition, from July 1, 2004, there is a 30 per
cent tax rebate on the balance of the cost of care, although parents
have been upset by the fine print which caps the rebate at $4000 and
postpones its payment for two years.<br>
<br>
Messara has calculated that
between 1990 and 2004, federal funding for child care has grown from
$200 million a year to $1.5 billion, increasing at an annual rate of
14.4 per cent, or four times the annual economic growth rate. This
year, with the first rebate payments, there will be close to $2 billion
to be fought over by private corporations and community-based centres.<br>
<br>
A spokesman for ABC - Groves declined five requests for an interview
over five weeks - confirmed the company received 44 per cent of its
income from government subsidies: $128 million of its $292 million
revenue last year.<br><br><br style="font-weight: bold;">
<span style="font-weight: bold;">Much of Groves’ wealth is earned from the Australian taxpayer through
family assistance payments, with the company hauling in up to $1
million a day from the federal government. ABC Learning is Australia’s
most subsidised company. Financial analysts in favour of ABC stocks
have called it “legislated growth”.</span><br><br><hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;"><h1>GROVES</h1>Born in South Africa and resident on the Gold Coast, "Eddy" Groves was
ranked No. 2 on BRW's list of the richest Australians aged under 40
last year, with an estimated wealth of $272 million.<h1><span style="font-weight: bold;"></span></h1><span style="font-weight: bold;"><br><br></span><hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;"><span style="font-weight: bold;"><br>By November 2005, </span>it had 697 childcare centres throughout Australia and New Zealand. In March 2006, it forecast that would have 950 centres in Australia and New Zealand by June 30, 2006.
<br><br style="font-weight: bold;"><span style="font-weight: bold;">On December 13, 2006 i</span>t was announced that ABC would acquire the second largest child care provider in the United States, Chicago based La Petite Academy for 330 million US Dollars as well as the 5th largest provider in the UK, Busy Bees Group, Ltd. With these acquisitions they are expanding into the UK market and increasing their market share in the US to 1%.[4]<br>&nbsp;It has expanded aggressively into the outsourcing of child care services, negotiating deals with some of Australia's largest employers including the Australian Department of Defence which involved taking over the Department's nineteen childcare facilities. Aside from offshore expansion, the company is also expanding in training and education.<br><br>&nbsp;It runs the ABC Early Childhood Training College, providing training for childcare workers, publishes a magazine Small Wonders aimed at parents with young children.

It is a highly profitable company, in the FY2004/5 recording net profit after tax of $52.3 million on total revenues of $292.7 million. <br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">The six months ending 31 December 2005 </span>showed no slowing in the financial momentum for the company with profit after tax reaching $38 million and revenues of $219.8 million.
ABC Learning received $128 million of its revenue from government subsidies in the last financial year.<br><br><span><p style="text-decoration: underline;">An unexpected drop of 42 per cent in profit in the second half of
2007 to $37.1 million and adverse market rumors about its $1.8 billion
debt triggered a decline in the company's share price. Several
directors of the company were then forced to dump millions of shares
after receiving <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margin_call" class="mw-redirect" title="Margin call">margin calls</a>. The combined effects caused the share price to plummet 43% to $2.15 after trading as low as $0.15. <sup id="_ref-5" class="reference"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_note-5" title="">[6]</a></sup></p>
<p>The timing of the share dumps have raised questions about <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insider_trading" title="Insider trading">insider trading</a>.<sup id="_ref-6" class="reference"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_Learning#_note-6" title="">[7]</a></sup></p><p><br></p></span>ABC Learning chief executive Eddy Groves was until this week Austock's
pin-up boy for having driven expansion across three continents that
assembled more than 2300 childcare centres with $2 billion of borrowing.<br>Groves approached Austock in 1997 as a young man and was provided with
$6 million in capital to start his business. Austock mentored Groves
for four years before they floated ABC.<br><br style="font-weight: bold;"><span style="font-weight: bold;">BB<br></span><a tiddlylink="ABC Radio National - Background Briefing: 22 February  1998  - Child Care Pains" refresh="link" class="tiddlyLink tiddlyLinkExisting" title="ABC Radio National - Background Briefing: 22 February  1998  - Child Care Pains - ratbagradio, Thursday, February 28, 2008 12:09:00 AM" href="javascript:;">ABC Radio National - Background Briefing: 22 February  1998  - Child Care Pains</a><br>With 600,000 children in child care, the cost to government has soared
to more than a billion dollars a year. There's been massive growth in
the past five years. In the early 1990s the Labor Government extended
child care funding, and for the first time gave assistance to parents
who had their children in private 'for-profit' child care centres.<br>Private centres then sprang up like mushrooms, and the non-profit
community centres which had always been publicly funded, quickly became
a minority. When the child care taskforce reported back in 1996 it
found the system was based on a mish-mash of subsidies, some for
parents, some for businesses, and others for different types of care.
It recommended all these subsidies be phased out over the next ten
years, and replaced with a new, single payment to parents.<br>Lyn Wannan is the Convenor of the National Association of Community Centres.<br>Lyn Wannan: I mean we know right now that Government policy is for no
growth in the community-based sector and for still some considerable
growth in the private sector. My view is that we need to retain a
community service sector, a non-profit community-owned sector. I think
that has to be a priority of government. I fear the loss of it
altogether. It has been the community-based sector which has fought
hard for the quality standards and regulations, and it has been the
community-based sector which has actually set the price in the past.<br><br>The push for regulations at that time was led by pre-school
associations, worried about the standard of informal care. Today an
estimated 180,000 children under the age of five are being looked after
in home-based, informal care. These are the everyday babysitting
arrangements made between families and friends, as well as the
money-making neighbourhood ventures. But not to be confused with Family
Day Care, which is a government-funded and licensed home-based scheme.<br><br><a tiddlylink="ABC Radio National - Background Briefing: 3 October  2004  - Child-Care Profits" refresh="link" class="tiddlyLink tiddlyLinkExisting" title="ABC Radio National - Background Briefing: 3 October  2004  - Child-Care Profits - ratbagradio, Thursday, February 28, 2008 12:11:00 AM" href="javascript:;">ABC Radio National - Background Briefing: 3 October  2004  - Child-Care Profits</a><br><br>As the rivers of public cash flow into childcare, who’s going to
benefit the most? Will it be parents who can go back to work? Or
children who get started on early learning programs, or will it be the
new breed of childcare centre owners who can’t believe their luck?<br><br>ABC News 9/9/04:Alan Kohler: Most of the action on the share market today was in the
childcare business. The three biggest listed operators of crèches, ABC
Learning Centres, Childcare Centres of Australia and Peppercorn
Management, announced a three-way merger with ABC on top. Now the share
prices of all three went up, but the big winner was Peppercorn, and
there was also a bit of interest in Qantas…<br><br>Gerald Tooth: The once cottage industry of childcare, run by
not-for-profit organisations and small private operators, is being
rapidly corporatised. That is, large stock market listed companies have
flooded into the sector which they see as a goldmine of profit
opportunity. It might be good news for you, if you’re an investor, but
is it good news for you and your children if you’re a parent?<br><br>Eddy Groves and his wife Le Neve. The former milkman now owns the
Brisbane Bullets Basketball team and has an estimated personal wealth
of $175-million. Most of that has been made from childcare.<br><br>Eddy Groves set up the company in 1988. In 2001 he floated it on the
stock market. At that stage he owned 31 childcare centres in South East
Queensland. Now, just three years later, he’s got 750 right across
Australia.<br><br>There are around four-and-a-half-thousand day care centres across
Australia. Traditionally the sector was dominated by small-scale
operators, community run not-for-profit organisations and small
privately-run centres.<br><br>But in 1997 the Howard Government
scrapped direct subsidies to not-for-profit childcare centres and in a
single stroke, childcare was changed. Where around 40% of government
funding had gone directly to centres, now all of it went to parents
through Child Care Benefit payments, that they pass on to the centre of
their choice. With access to a new funding stream, private centres
boomed and with the not-for-profits decimated, childcare was opened up
as a lucrative field for profit making.<br><br>Seven years later, the
government has more than doubled its childcare spend and the childcare
sector is now seen as an industry, a multi-billion dollars industry.
And it’s the new corporate players that dominate, with their
shareholder backing, management systems and economies of scale. And
it’s all happened in the mere blink of an eye.<br><br>ABC Learning
Centres led the way as the first to list on the Stock Exchange just
three years ago in 2001. Others quickly followed: Child Care Centres
Australia, <a tiddlylink="FutureOne" refresh="link" class="tiddlyLink tiddlyLinkNonExisting" title="The tiddler 'FutureOne' doesn't yet exist" href="javascript:;">FutureOne</a>, Peppercorn Management Group and Hutchison’s Childcare services,<br><br>With
the recent merger of ABC Learning Centres, Peppercorn and Child Care
Centres Australia, Eddy Groves’ company will now control 750 centres.
And as he said earlier, he reckons the company will soon be worth a
billion dollars.<br><br>Meanwhile, most childcare workers are paid $10 to $12 an hour. That’s about $22,000 to $25,000 a year.<br><br style="font-style: italic;"><span style="font-style: italic;">NOTE : </span><span style="font-style: italic;" id="m_ucCompleteMessage18245_m_ucBasicMessage_m_lblTextValue">I
have a window into chilcare as my wife works in this field, Even with
level three qualificatons and 5 years experience at $19 per hour, the
pay is less than you can get as an uneducated worker in most fields.<br><br>MAY 2005:</span><span style="font-style: italic;">The Australian Industrial Relations Commission this week approved pay
rises of between $6 and $146 per week for the15,000-odd childcare
workers, whose current qualified pay rate is just $14 an hour<br><br>Fulltime childcare workers earn a pittance _ as little as $25,000 a year. So, why don’t we pay them more? <br><br></span>Pam Cahir of Early Childhood Australia.<br><br>Pam Cahir: What’s
happening in childcare services is happening in all childcare services
right now, that is, you can’t get staff, you certainly can’t get
qualified staff, you can get casual staff, the turnover of staff is
enormous, and there are major issues around the training of staff that
we’re getting. And staff are poorly paid, the conditions are awful,
there is no career path in the sector, and so there are a lot of
fundamentals to get right before you start worrying about who’s
actually providing the care. In my view now, I don’t think it’s
appropriate or OK for parents to go to work on the back of the wages of
poorly paid staff in childcare services, I don’t think it’s OK for
services to have ratios of one to five for babies. I mean I can’t
imagine looking after five babies, I just think that’s just an
impossible task, and if you had quadruplets in this country you’d get
support. So there are some quite fundamental things that you have to
get right in order for us to actually set this sector OK.<br><br>Childcare workers are currently battling in the Industrial Relations
Courts in Victoria, South Australia and the ACT for wage rises. The
childcare entrepreneurs are opposing them.<br>If low wages are one pillar of the childcare business, government funding is the other.<br><br>The
Federal Government already pours $1.7-billion a year into childcare
through the Child Care Benefit payments. ABC Learning Centre’s business
plan relies on these taxpayer dollars for 50% of its revenue.<br><br>The debate about the privatisation of Telstra has been endless and
consumed hundreds of hours of parliamentary debate and produced
kilometres of newspaper copy, but when it comes to the question of
whether we should be selling shares in how we raise our children there
has only been the merest of squeaks.<br><br>As the use of childcare has skyrocketed in Australia, 80% of the
country’s four-year-olds are now spending some time in some form of
care each week, and she asks, do we want that care to be run by
well-trained professionals who can properly guide a child’s development
at that critical time.<br><br>For example, the ratio of carers to children in babies’ rooms in New
South Wales is one to five. In Queensland it’s one to four. Group
leaders in Queensland must be two-year trained, in New South Wales,
three year trained.<br><br>oy Goodfellow is an early childhood expert at Macquarie University. She
recently wrote a paper titled ‘Is the marketplace influencing our view
of the child?’ which focused on the shift in who is seen as ‘the
consumer’ of childcare services. Once it was the child, now apparently,
it’s the parent.<br><br>Joy Goodfellow is concerned that profit-driven
childcare services have lost sight of just how critical it is for
children’s development to build consistent, long-term relationships
between children and childcare workers.<br><br>Joy Goodfellow: So where
we have situations where an organisation is trying to cut its costs and
salaries are the high cost, for example, in a not-for-profit
organisation you could expect salary costs to be around 80% of their
total budget. The corporate sector and the two corporates that I’ve
looked at are Peppercorn and ABC Learning. They hope to keep their
budgets down under 50%. So the way you keep your salary budget down
under 50% is to think about the cost of staff in your centre. So you
might want to employ people who have lesser qualification if your
regulation allows you to do that. It might say you want to have higher
numbers of casual staff so that you can then put those staff off if you
don’t have the children there. It might mean that in a day you have
only maybe a small handful of children left in the afternoon, so you
say OK, we’ll group all those children together under this staff
member, and send the other staff member home. So there are things, or
practices that can occur that are I believe, detrimental to children
but they are undertaken in order to economise.<br><br>With ABC Learning Centres now owning 750 centres, what would be the
impact on children if such a large player found itself in financial
difficulty?<br><br>The recent history of Child Care Centres Australia provides a salutary
insight. Caroline Fewster is an Associate Professor in Early Childhood
at Bond University on the Gold Coast. She was also a board member of
Child Care Centres Australia, a board that was chaired by Liberal party
figure, Andrew Peacock.<br><br>CCCA was heading down a similar path to
ABC Learning Centres. It had floated on the stockmarket with the help
of Andrew Peacock’s son-in-law and prominent Liberal, Michael Kroger.
The company was rapidly expanding when it acquired 41 centres in
Western Australia.<br><br>The company hadn’t done its sums properly
though, overestimating its profits by almost 90%. The whole thing went
belly-up and shares were suspended from trading.<br><br>NEWS___________________________<br><br><br>After amassing a $270 million personal fortune by the age of 40,
Eddy Groves lost $45 million in just two hours on Tuesday morning.<br>Sadly for them, Eddy can be a hard man to track down. His preferred mode of transport is a private Citation <a tiddlylink="CJ3" refresh="link" class="tiddlyLink tiddlyLinkNonExisting" title="The tiddler 'CJ3' doesn't yet exist" href="javascript:;">CJ3</a> jet, which means he can whip in and out of Australia's airports at will.<br><br>It's the very same model that famous flying Australian Dick Smith
likes to get about in and, in case you were wondering, they cost about $<a tiddlylink="US7" refresh="link" class="tiddlyLink tiddlyLinkNonExisting" title="The tiddler 'US7' doesn't yet exist" href="javascript:;">US7</a> million ($A7.45 million). Which isn't quite as much as Eddy and his co-directors have blown in margin calls this week.<br><br>Federal government child-care subsidies have provided the foundations on which ABC Learning was built.<br><br>Indeed, Federal Government subsidies contributed about 45% to ABC Learning's Australian revenue last financial year.<br><br>One of the planks of John Howard's election pitch was the Liberal Party's $687 million child-care plan.<br><br>If
it won the election, the Coalition planned to pay the child-care rebate
directly to operators, instead of directly to parents, from April 1.
Directly to operators such as ABC Learning, which dominates the market.<br><br>The
company's share price soared on that news - up from $5.52 before the
announcement to a high $6.28, before settling back to close at $5.99.<br><br>n a recent presentation to sharemarket investors Mr Groves said ABC was
on target to increase the number of its centres in Australia and New
Zealand from 660 in the middle of last year to 850 by the end of June.
The company has more than tripled the number of its centres in three
years.<br><br>It has snapped up three rival sharemarket-listed
child-care operators since late-2003, and in November last year spent
$218 million buying the third-largest operator in the US, the Learning
Care Group.<br><br>The company has also bought a handful of privately
owned child-care companies, including the Sydney-based Universal
Childcare, for $18 million, in October. The stake of Mr Groves and his
wife, Le Neve, in ABC is now valued at $350 million.<br><br>The chairman of Kids Campus, John Murphy, declined to confirm speculation his company was in talks with ABC.<br><br>The Association of Community Based Children's Services has raised alarm over the potential deal.<br><br>The
association's chairwoman, Lynne Wannan, said it would result in more
child-care operators having a stronger motive to make profits and
please shareholders, rather than provide quality child care.<br><br>Source: <a target="_blank" title="External link to http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,23288077-20142,00.html" href="http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,23288077-20142,00.html" class="externalLink">Childcare business spoonfed : The Australian</a><br>n June last year, ABC reported owning 1188 centres across Australia and
New Zealand and 35 owned and 12 managed nurseries in Britain. In recent
months it has expanded its interests in the US and now owns 1015
centres to become that country's second-biggest provider. While figures
are hard to pin down, ABC's estimated control of the overall market in
Australia ranges between 20 and 30 per cent across the board, and in
some regions such as Victoria is understood to be even higher.<br><br>Ahead
of last November's federal election, Labor offered a $1.5billion
childcare policy, increasing the Child Care Tax rebate from 30 per cent
to 50per cent of formal childcare costs to a new cap of $7500 a child.<br><br>___________________<br>What happens when the Government throws $2 billion into child care? Meet Fast Eddy Groves<br>Source: <a target="_blank" title="External link to http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/cradle-snatcher/2006/03/10/1141701698670.html?page=fullpage#contentSwap2" href="http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/cradle-snatcher/2006/03/10/1141701698670.html?page=fullpage#contentSwap2" class="externalLink">Cradle snatcher - National - smh.com.au</a><br>Since then centres such as Clovelly have been struggling to stay
afloat. Almost overnight they lost their taxpayer-funded operating
subsidy of $38,000 a year, and had to raise their fees. Twenty years
ago, the centre charged $55 a week, says Pender. Today it's $55 a day
for the 55 children who are two or over and $60 for those aged under
two.<br><br>Born in South Africa and resident on the Gold Coast, "Eddy" Groves was
ranked No. 2 on BRW's list of the richest Australians aged under 40
last year, with an estimated wealth of $272 million.<br><br>As well as
holding 14.5 per cent of ABC (with his wife and co-director Le Neve)
Groves is a director of more than 40 other companies. He controls
Quantum Foods, one of Queensland's largest milk distributors; he is a
director of Bet Worldwide, which owns Canberra's online gaming venture
Sports Acumen; and he is often seen courtside at Brisbane Bullets
games, the erratic basketball team he owns.<br><br>Wannan says that in the past 15 years the number of privately run
centres in Australia has risen from fewer than half the total to 70 per
cent, with many community centres closing or being taken over.<br><br>This dismays Lynne Wannan, the convener of the National Association of <a tiddlylink="Community-Based" refresh="link" class="tiddlyLink tiddlyLinkNonExisting" title="The tiddler 'Community-Based' doesn't yet exist" href="javascript:;">Community-Based</a>
Children's Services, who has recently returned from a tour of Canada
campaigning to prevent an Australian-style "privatisation" of
child-care services there.<br><br>The association formally objected to
ABC's takeover of the rival Peppercorn group in 2004 to the Australian
Competition and Consumer Commission, on the grounds that it would lead
to regional monopolies. The commission allowed the takeover to go ahead
after ABC gave undertakings to close some centres - it has shut or sold
60 - and not to buy any more in certain regional markets. Wannan says
that in the past 15 years the number of privately run centres in
Australia has risen from fewer than half the total to 70 per cent, with
many community centres closing or being taken over.<br><br>"But instead
of increased competition, lower prices and improved quality, the
reverse has happened," she says. "It has led to a classic market
failure."<br><br>According to an Australian Bureau of Statistics
survey, the cost of child care rose 10 per cent last year, and is up 62
per cent in the past four years. Some Sydney centres are charging $100
a day. In a bid to forestall this, when he announced a backdating of
the tax rebate in December 2004, the Treasurer, Peter Costello, warned
operators not to exploit the subsidy by increasing fees. Six months
later, ABC substantially increased its charges.<br><br>he Federal Government pays parents a means-tested subsidy for each
child, ranging from $144 a week to $24.15 a week for parents earning
more than $95,683. In addition, from July 1, 2004, there is a 30 per
cent tax rebate on the balance of the cost of care, although parents
have been upset by the fine print which caps the rebate at $4000 and
postpones its payment for two years.<br><br>Messara has calculated that
between 1990 and 2004, federal funding for child care has grown from
$200 million a year to $1.5 billion, increasing at an annual rate of
14.4 per cent, or four times the annual economic growth rate. This
year, with the first rebate payments, there will be close to $2 billion
to be fought over by private corporations and community-based centres.<br><br>A spokesman for ABC - Groves declined five requests for an interview
over five weeks - confirmed the company received 44 per cent of its
income from government subsidies: $128 million of its $292 million
revenue last year.<br><br>Messara's calculations give investors an even juicier insight. In the
five years to 2008 he expects ABC to make net profits of $379 million.
If that figure of 44 per cent remains constant, this will represent
$167 million of taxpayers' money transferred directly into the pockets
of Eddy and Le Neve Groves and their fellow shareholders - on top of
the $400,000 salary packages the two receive.<br><br>After complaints in 2004 that ABC had been underpaying its staff and
forcing them to clean toilets and buy their own uniforms, the
Queensland branch of the union that represents child-care workers, the
Liquor, Hospitality and Miscellaneous Union, handed parents pamphlets
which Groves says portrayed him as "mean and greedy" and implied he was
"trying to drive down low wages of child-care workers to line his own
pockets".<br><br>In an unprecedented action, Groves sued the union's
Queensland secretary, Ron Monaghan, for defamation. This has had the
extraordinary outcome that none of the union's officials contacted by
the Herald would risk commenting on the pay or conditions of ABC staff.<br><br>The
union's officer responsible for child-care workers in NSW, Jim Lloyd,
said: "I am not able to comment on ABC at all." When asked whether this
was connected with the litigation in Queensland, he said: "Good
question."<br><br>Even after the substantial rises granted this week, the minimum award
rate for a child-care worker with one year's experience is $611 a week.
However, ABC workers' pay cannot be independently verified because they
are required to sign confidential agreements. Groves has pointed out
that, in return, they are issued with 150 shares (currently worth
$1200) as a signing bonus - and he says he has a low staff turnover
rate of 8 per cent a year.<br>_____________CRIKEY ____________<br><br style="font-weight: bold;"><br style="font-weight: bold;"><span style="font-weight: bold;">Much of Groves’ wealth is earned from the Australian taxpayer through
family assistance payments, with the company hauling in up to $1
million a day from the federal government. ABC Learning is Australia’s
most subsidised company. Financial analysts in favour of ABC stocks
have called it “legislated growth”.<br><br></span><br>ABC Learning's half-year earnings have dropped by 42 per cent to
$37.1 million, prompting investor concerns about the company's debt
structure.<br><br>At one stage today, shares dropped 70 per cent to touch a six-year low of $1.15, but have closed at $2.14.<br><br>The company, which has been in a massive expansion phase in the past
two years, has a negative balance of hard physical assets to intangible
assets to the tune of $1.75 per share.<br><br>The company also has $1.2 billion of debt repayable in three years, and $600 million of convertible notes on a nine-year term.<br><br>____<br><br><br>Source: <a target="_blank" title="External link to http://www.armedia.net.au/archive/2002b/edit03.html" href="http://www.armedia.net.au/archive/2002b/edit03.html" class="externalLink">The selling out of children's services</a><br><br>In 1991, the Keating Labor Government introduced childcare subsidies
which were aimed at the creation of better funding levels for
children's services. While this did inject more funds into services, it
was also a signal to corporate opportunists to develop methods of
capitalising on these government subsidies and corporatising childcare.<br><br><br>In 2000, the Coalition Government introduced the Child Care Benefit
scheme and, with a higher funding level for services, more
opportunities were created for private operators to achieve greater
profitability. While the benefits of the corporatisation of early
childhood education are debatable, these corporations have certainly
capitalised on childcare, through the float of their shares on the
Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) and an astronomical rise in their share
pricings.<br><br><br>It has long been argued that privatisation and corporatised
competition drives the market towards creating cheaper and more
efficient services but, as history has shown, it can also sometimes
result in poorly-managed businesses and a decrease in the quality of
product and service. In the drive to create profits and to appease
shareholders, businesses can become unrealistically ambitious within
their markets and collapse in a spectacular fashion, as was the case
with HIH in Australia and Enron in the United States.<br><br><br>According to Federal Government's figures, while the cost of a
typical childcare cost is $94.70 each week, a family pays only $33.10,
with the $61.60 being paid by the government directly to the service
provider. With over 60 per cent of all revenue for childcare centres
coming from government subsidies, this means that within these
corporatised services, shareholder profits are directly supported by
taxpayer funds. And it is this area which is of great concern to
community-based centres and to the general community. It also raises
the question of whether it is ethical for government funds to be
diverted into shareholder profits, or whether these funds should be
maintained for the quality care and education of young children and the
creation of better working conditions for childcare workers.<br><br><br><br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;"><br><br></span><br></html>
ABC Learning halts trading

Posted 4 hours 23 minutes ago
Updated 3 hours 27 minutes ago
ABC Learning Centres Ltd CEO Eddie Groves

Eddy Groves says the share slump will not affect the operation of ABC Learning Centres. (File photo) (AAP: Dave Hunt)

    * Video: Groves reassures ABC Learning investors (ABC News)
    * Related Story: Debt concerns slash ABC Learning's share price

Childcare operator ABC Learning Centres says there are interested buyers for parts of the business.

The company has asked for a two-day trading halt on its shares, but it says discussions might take longer.

The company's shares were yesterday dumped on the Australian Stock Exchange, tumbling 43 per cent to $2.14 in response to a sharp fall in profits and questions over its debt levels.

Yesterday, chief executive Eddy Groves said investors have clearly been disappointed by the profit result, but the company is equipped to meet its debt obligations.

He said the tumble will not force the closure of any of its centres.

"It's the share price and the share market, but there's no effect to our business," he said.

Tags: business-economics-and-finance, company-news, australia

Source: [[ABC Learning halts trading - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)|http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/02/27/2173864.htm]]
ABC Learning loses mentor's support

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Tim Blue and Sarah Elks | February 28, 2008

STRUGGLING childcare giant ABC Learning has long enjoyed the support of its brokers, even until Monday.

Melbourne-based broker Austock, which took ABC Learning to a share market float, had a buy recommendation on the stock until the release of the earnings figures.

Other brokers were disappointed, but did not declare ABC Learning a sell.

On Monday immediately after the earnings bombshell, Citigroup described ABC Learning as a hold, immediately followed by the words high-risk.

The anonymous analyst at the broker said company shares then trading at $3.74 would rise as high as $4.25, or lower than previous predictions of $5.60 a share.

Within hours of the result, ABC Learning shares plunged to $2.14, before being suspended.

ABC Learning chief executive Eddy Groves was until this week Austock's pin-up boy for having driven expansion across three continents that assembled more than 2300 childcare centres with $2 billion of borrowing.

Groves approached Austock in 1997 as a young man and was provided with $6 million in capital to start his business. Austock mentored Groves for four years before they floated ABC.

Austock chairman Bill Bessemer is an ABC director, while Groves owns 4 per cent of Austock. Mr Boyle confirmed that Austock earned $27 million in ABC work in 2006 and $2.5 million last year. "We are mainly an Australian broker and were not able to help him as much when he went offshore," he said.

Macquarie Bank analysts have an "underperform" recommendation, and have described future earnings guidance as "a stretch".

They also highlighted ABC's debt levels of roughly $1.7 billion.

Meanwhile, watchdog ASIC is keeping a close interest. Commissioner Belinda Gibson said: "Given the current market volatility you can assume that ASIC and the ASX are monitoring the market and its participants even more closely than we do normally."

But one anonymous broker slammed what he saw as the lack of oversight by regulators on short selling.

"It's disgusting that the hedge funds, the ASX, ASIC and all regulatory bodies have allowed this to happen," one broker, who did not want to be identified, said.

"Only last Friday ABC Learning was trading at $4, the hedge funds knew Mr Groves had a margin position against his stock and the fact that they were allowed to continually sell and put pressure on the share price to push it down to $1.15 was just disgraceful and it's not what the market is about."

Additional reporting by  Lisa Macnamara

Source: [[ABC Learning loses mentor's support : The Australian|http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,23287092-20142,00.html]]
	
Sundays at 9.10am, repeated Tuesdays at 7.10pm
Child Care Pains
Sunday 22 February  1998 

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Program Transcript
THEME
Chris Bullock: A generation of Australian children and their parents have had their lives transformed by affordable, safe child care.

The first child care children of the '70s are standing at the door of the creche again today, dropping off their own children.

But the political ground is shifting; many parents are finding that child care is not such an attractive prospect, and there are those who would warn them off altogether.

John Bradford: Look, I think it's really the value you place on motherhood, and it seems to me that we've downgraded that. We've made women feel guilty about staying out of the workforce. In fact I think a couple of feminists have basically sort of said if they weren't in the workforce shortly after they had babies, then they were essentially bludging. But I think motherhood's very important. I can't imagine a higher calling for a woman than to put that time into the development of young lives in their most formative years.

Chris Bullock: John Bradford is the Liberal member for McPherson on the Gold Coast, and he's a prominent member of the Lyons Forum, a prayer and policy advice group with strong views on social policy areas, like family values and child care.

There are many reasons why women would choose to work or to stay at home: the highest calling of motherhood may be one, but there are more mundane reasons, like making ends meet.

I'm Chris Bullock and welcome to Background Briefing.

'WIZARD OF OZ' VIDEO

In the western suburbs of Melbourne, a little girl is perched on a lounge chair, watching her favourite film.

What are you watching?

Cassandra: 'The Wizard of Oz'.

Chris Bullock: Cassandra is four, and until the end of last year, she and her two-year-old sister Jessica went to a child care centre for three days a week. Their mother, Diane, had a part-time job, until she had to make a difficult decision.

Diane: I want to work, I want to work part-time, but I keep on doing the sums and they just keep on coming up in a way that makes me think it's not worth it. It's just not worth it. And my husband said to me, 'Look, we can shoulder this child care, it's not just your wage' but as a mother, you don't see it like that, you see it as 'If most of my pay is going in child care, I might as well be at home'. And you've also got the added stresses of people telling you that you're better off at home --

Chris Bullock: That happens a lot, does it?

Diane: It happens a lot. There are two camps, and one is from family and friends who don't work telling you 'Just wait until they go back to school' and the other camp that says, professionals that I know who say, 'You stay out of the workforce too long, and you will find it very difficult to get back in.' And so you make a decision do you work for nothing to keep your hand in, I don't know, I don't know what the answer is.

Chris Bullock: And do you not in the end feel that there will be some big benefit from you staying at home with the children, that will be well and truly worthwhile in the end?

Diane: I really believe that for my children, I don't speak on behalf of other people's children, my children like balance, and they like a stimulating environment and they also love to be at home with their mother. And when I'm working, they are happy, they enjoy going to creche, they enjoy being with other children, and I think that when I was at work last year I had two very happy children. I still have two very happy children, I just have to find things for them outside of the home, and they cost money.

So your occasional care, your ballet, your gym groups, gymbaroos, your swimming lessons, all the things that you can give your children as extras, they cost money, and I've just spent about $400 on that.

Chris Bullock: Diane's dilemma is being repeated in families across Australia.

Patricia Faulkner raised two children with the help of child care; her daughter is now 20 and her son five. Three years ago Patricia Faulkner was given the job of leading a national taskforce on child care.

Patricia Faulkner: With the first child, there was still a stigma attached to women wanting to work and leaving their children, and I remember my mother sort of feeling that I was doing totally the wrong thing, and that child care was not a good option for a child. What surprised me when I came back and did the inquiry, was the number of women who believed that child care is extremely beneficial, and if their children are not getting that benefit they're somehow behind other children who are getting that benefit.

So we had women at home sort of saying 'Well it's not fair that the women at work get the good share of child care, and we're left with our children not having that same opportunity'. So it's been a tremendous cultural shift in the 15 years between my children.

Chris Bullock: Patricia Faulkner was also struck by a change in mood: many working parents were on the verge of quitting child care.

Patricia Faulkner: That's right, and I'm seeing that increasingly that people - I mean we women of the '70s really pushed to get into the workforce, and then I think you're seeing a position at the moment where people are saying 'Well it's not all that we wanted; what we really want is to somehow mix work and caring for children together, and we want men and women to share that equally.' And I think a lot of women have found that they've been doing it on their own for a long time.

The catchcry of the '70s was about choice, that women wanted to be able to choose to work. I don't think they wanted to stay there if they didn't want to work, and I don't think, again I think there's been a change in men and women, both saying that they don't want to be forced to stay in the workforce. They want to choose. I think that the availability of child care permitted people to make a choice, and that's what the women who fought for child care wanted, they wanted to make the choice. So I don't really think it equates to the other side of the Lyons Forum argument that it encourages people into the workforce, because being in the workforce and being a parent is a very difficult thing, and you don't just go into it because there is child care, you go into it for fulfilment, you go into it for a lot of other reasons; you go into it to offer better opportunities for your children. But there are some people that are finding that the choice is not a very attractive one for either the husband or the wife.

Chris Bullock: Patricia Faulkner was personally appointed in 1995 by Prime Minister Paul Keating, to help design a child care system for the future.

With 600,000 children in child care, the cost to government has soared to more than a billion dollars a year. There's been massive growth in the past five years. In the early 1990s the Labor Government extended child care funding, and for the first time gave assistance to parents who had their children in private 'for-profit' child care centres.

Private centres then sprang up like mushrooms, and the non-profit community centres which had always been publicly funded, quickly became a minority. When the child care taskforce reported back in 1996 it found the system was based on a mish-mash of subsidies, some for parents, some for businesses, and others for different types of care. It recommended all these subsidies be phased out over the next ten years, and replaced with a new, single payment to parents.

John Howard's Government, keen to make savings and with a philosophy sympathetic to home-based care, took a cue from the taskforce. It abolished grants to community centres, reduced levels of assistance for long day care, and moved towards a centralised system of payments.

The home-based Family Day Care scheme kept its funding. The big losers are the community centres, which have been forced for the first time to compete on equal terms with private centres.

The community centres say in the past they had used their Government grants to have extra staff, to ensure the highest possible quality of care; that's why they were so popular and always had the longest waiting lists. Now they've had to cut staff and put up their fees, and they're losing children.

Why are the children leaving? Well, it depends on who you ask. The Government says parents are simply exercising a greater choice of child care; the community sector believes children are being forced out of their centres.

Lyn Wannan is the Convenor of the National Association of Community Centres.

Lyn Wannan: I mean we know right now that Government policy is for no growth in the community-based sector and for still some considerable growth in the private sector. My view is that we need to retain a community service sector, a non-profit community-owned sector. I think that has to be a priority of government. I fear the loss of it altogether. It has been the community-based sector which has fought hard for the quality standards and regulations, and it has been the community-based sector which has actually set the price in the past.

Chris Bullock: There were predictions that a great number of children would disappear from the system and that many jobs would be lost as a result of the changes the Coalition Government brought in. Has that been borne out?

Lyn Wannan: Yes it has. We've now seen Australia-wide, fee increases. That's the main problem, the fees are now around about $170 per week per child. That's really the national average though, very high fee increases, that's an increase of about $18 per child per week, which is higher than has been the normal increase in fees. We've found that an average of four families have left child care centres, this is the community-based sector, and those parents cite the high cost of care as the reason for leaving, and in many cases those families, the parents, have one or both of them, decided to move towards part-time care. Some parents are trying to juggle work so they share that. Both work part-time, or they have a grandparent or someone helping with an additional day of care, so that they can really cut down their usage of the formal child care for which they have to pay. So yes, families are leaving, services are closing, children are being placed in alternative forms of care.

Chris Bullock: The community sector's claims are based on surveys conducted in several States. In Western Australia, New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, Queensland, and a national survey. But they don't impress the Federal Minister for Family Services, Warwick Smith, because, he says, they're politically motivated.

Warwick Smith: Well there's some contention as to how many people are actually leaving child care. It suits the Labor Party to allege that there are vast numbers, but in actual fact we don't necessarily believe that there are. There are people who are changing the way in which they use some of the child care services. For example, there's large increases in family day care arrangements, and there's been some rationalisation of some of the centres over a period of time, and that's partly because everybody recognises this.

There's been a proliferation of some centres in areas where demand does not need for there to be so many centres, so you're getting that as variations taking place as well, but we're actually seeing an increase in the number of child care places being made available, increased utilisation across the nation, and we've allocated in the Budget process accordingly.

Chris Bullock: The increased utilisation doesn't seem to stack up with what I've come across in research, and there is data coming in from a number of States now: Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, Western Australia, which is all consistently saying, and this is largely in the community sector, that there are large numbers of children being taken out of long day care centres in particular, that they've been taken out because fees have increased and parents have made a decision that they can no longer afford child care. Now for some of them, perhaps hundreds, perhaps thousands, that means leaving the workforce as well.

Warwick Smith: Well I mean that's rejected. I mean the community-based care arrangements in this country have been provided with strong support over a long period of time, and there's no clear evidence to support what they are saying. The development within the private sector of places, has not seen the allegations that are made by the community --

Chris Bullock: Well I don't think they've done the same research, have they? You're rejecting studies from the National Association of Community-Based Centres, which covered 464 centres across the country; from the New South Wales Council of Social Services, which covered 328 parents I think; New South Wales independent group Families at Work, which covered 1250 surveys; the Queensland Coalition of Child Care Centres --

Warwick Smith: But these are all groups that are in the community sector that are pursuing a political agenda, and I've rejected their surveys. I mean the one that was done --

Chris Bullock: So there's no validity to the families leaving those centres?

Warwick Smith: There is no validity in what they're saying. I mean the one survey that we know about, the New South Wales one, was done one afternoon on a phone poll. It just doesn't stack up; we have a planning system in place which the Labor Party supported through the new Child Care Act, it's endorsed by the industry, there are extensive discussions about how we should proceed with planning and child care in this country, and the allegations that people are leaving in droves is just not borne out by the facts.

This is a sector that's large. I mean there's 180-odd-thousand people that work in this area, and 600-odd-thousand children, $5-billion, this is a large sector, an active sector in our community, a service sector, not an industry, but a service sector, that is profoundly important for the Australian economy and Australian families. So there will be differing views. I need to accommodate those legitimate ones where I can, and make sure that the compass which I'm following is one that points towards getting a better system, and that's what I'm trying to do.

Chris Bullock: You only need to take a drive around the suburbs and you'll see the Vacancy signs outside child care centres. That's a big change from two years ago when it could often take months to find a place for your child.

The survey of 464 community child care centres in December found 80% had increased their fees, 80% had children withdrawn from their care, and 50% of centres said they knew parents who'd given up work to care for children because of the cost of child care.

The Carr family from Newcastle fit the description 'John Howard's Battlers', middle-income earners struggling with jobs, kids and a mortgage.

Stuart works for BHP, and Leonie has always worked too, up until now.

Leonie (speaking to young child): How many grapes do you want? Not too much? Just a few. You want lots, do you?

Chris Bullock: Her last job was with a hospital, but when child care became too expensive last year, Leonie quit and stayed at home to look after their two children.

Leonie: Well the children were going to day care three days a week; on the Wednesday of that week my husband used to work overtime so that he could have a half-day off, so that that kept it down to three-days a week. The costs were round about $56 a day, for two children.

Chris Bullock: Your family's not on a low income, you'd be on a reasonable income, so you're not somebody that already receives a large amount of child care assistance in the first place. So what difference did changes in fees make?

Leonie: Well the changes did affect us, because instead of taking home close on $400 a month from my work, it became just about nothing.

Chris Bullock: And that was entirely due to child care fees, or were there other things involved?

Leonie: No, entirely due to child care. The fees went up over $10 a day per child, and with the child care fees when I started, I earned a low income, what I would call a low income, because I had to pay the child care, but I was quite happy with that because I was still bringing home enough to put my share, or what I felt was my share, into the mortgage. Once the fees went up, it was a case of I was working for child care.

It does worry me, and it upsets me sometimes when I look back at what a wonderful job I had, and I've given it up, and I know that I probably won't get that opportunity again. I probably won't work now for probably four or five years, and in that time, computers and everything else is going to change so much that I'm going to have to retrain and probably start at the bottom again.

Chris Bullock: What do you like about staying at home and not being a working mother? And what do you really miss about going to work?

Leonie: Well I love being home with the kids, and doing things with them, seeing them change. I think sometimes when you're working you miss those things, you're so busy running around that you do miss all those little changes, which has been fantastic. But I do miss the social aspects of work and interaction with other people; you don't spend as much time out and about as you would when you're working. It's great being a mum, and I think it's a wonderful thing for all people if they can do it, but it's also a bit of a pity that you have to miss out on that other aspect of life.

SFX: KIDS PLAYING AT CHILD CARE CENTRE

Chris Bullock: The Vacancy board is out at the centre where Leonie's children used to go. The Director asked that her name not be used. Her not-for-profit centre has places for 50 children.

Director: We've actually got 18 vacancies at the moment. They're in the three to fives mainly, some in the two to three years room.

Chris Bullock: So if you've got 50 places and only 32 of them are filled, what does that do to the books?

Director: Well it makes you have to cut places somewhere. We had to reduce staff at some stages to try and cope with the budget, so that we're not going over and trying to come out even.

Chris Bullock: How do you go about filling the extras, given the prices have already driven a number of people away?

Director: Well it's a lot of advertising, newspapers, letter box drops, things that you never used to have to do, getting advertisements through newspapers coming to you when you have special events.

Chris Bullock: And that's you're job as a Director, to get up that publicity and try and increase the numbers of kids here?

Director: Yes, and take on the role of salesman, because when people do ring up to inquire, you have to sell your service, otherwise they ring somewhere else.

Chris Bullock: You came from a private centre; in your experience has it been the case that community-based centres were often providing a service in terms of ratio of staff to children was well above and beyond what actually they were required to, whereas the private centres were much closer to the bottom line?

Director: Private centres usually only have the minimum amount of qualified staff that they have to have, and minimum amount of ratio staff, whereas community-based centres often have more and above. We have two extra staff members that we don't legally have to have, but choose to have for the benefit of the children as extra help in the rooms.

Chris Bullock: Private centres say they can still offer the same quality of care, even though they may have less staff. Their view is that the cutting of grants to community centres simply levelled the industry playing field.

SFX ABC LEARNING SCHOOL

Woman: Director could mean directing traffic, what does director mean? Just jot down a few ideas --

Chris Bullock: In Brisbane, a group of child care workers, mostly young women, are being trained to be part of the country's biggest private child care network.

The network of ABC early childhood centres is owned and run by husband and wife, Eddie and Le Neve Groves. It now has 26 centres in Queensland and seven in Victoria. Eddie Groves says in private centres, rising fees are also driving parents away.

Eddie Groves: Fees normally go up probably I'd say on an average for most centres and for us, it's usually about $1 a day, or $5 a week per child. That's normally the standard yearly increase. Now that yearly increase is only in place for one reason, and that's basically to cover the extra increases in wages. Last year we had three increases in wages for the staff. And you've got to remember, if you go back to when we first started in child care, I think our fees were about $80 a week. Now they're $145 a week, not double, but close to doubling.

At that time when we opened, there was no child care assistance. I think you'll find that even now with child care assistance, the gap between what the parents pay and the child care assistance is about what it was ten years ago, when there was no child care assistance. All that's happened is that money's been eaten up from either wages or increased costs because of regulations or increased costs because of accreditation. Basically the consumer's no better off, and the Government's pumping $1-billion into this situation. So everybody's taken their little piece of the pie along the way, and that's the only reason why child care fees go up. We don't make any more money out of it, we just need to cover the costs every year.

Chris Bullock: With that $5 increase, do you find that's enough to force some parents to remove their children from your centres?

Eddie Groves: Yes, for sure. That little extra increase will do it. And that's what scares me, is I believe we're right on the breaking point now. At the fees at the level they are, and the wages that they are in Queensland, I mean if you look in Victoria, probably $200 a week isn't out of the question to pay for childcare. In Sydney it's $250 a week, and all it is is comparable to wages down there, their wages are higher in Victoria, their wages are higher in New South Wales.

Chris Bullock: There are more than two-and-a-half-thousand private centres nationwide, and some of them are in trouble because there are too many of them in some areas. The problem is most acute in South East Queensland, where developers went crazy building centres in Brisbane and on the Gold Coast, although there are still parts of Brisbane where it's very hard to find a vacancy.

A handful of private centres have closed in the past year, but large numbers have been closing down rooms and shedding staff.

Gwynne Bridge owns and runs four centres and is the President of the Child Care Industry Association of Queensland.

Gwynne Bridge: Every Budget we have a change, and those changes are taking its toll on the parents and on the industry. We need some security and the changes like the 50-hour cap-on work-related care this year, has resulted in considerable expense to the parents, and more changes in the industry.

Chris Bullock: I was reading some of your research from the private sector in Queensland, which suggested across the State there's an average of 1.9 staff positions lost from each centre.

Gwynne Bridge: That would be correct, and particularly at this time of the year, in the beginning of the year it's probably even a lot more than that, because centres aren't operating at anywhere near their potential, and the staff are laid off; the staff are losing jobs throughout the industry, so it'll just be a matter of waiting to see how the industry grows in this year to see how many staff regain positions. Plus also hours of staff employed are cut.

Chris Bullock: And those staff would virtually all be women, would they?

Gwynne Bridge: Yes there are males in the child care industry, but not a lot of males. It actually is a major blow against women, the whole changes in this, because it's putting strains and stresses on women where women were starting to feel that they had a worthwhile place in working, and in the marketplace as far as jobs and their careers went. And now they're having to re-think the whole thing.

Chris Bullock: Is it that serious?

Gwynne Bridge: As far as job losses go, it is quite serious, yes.

Chris Bullock: Gwynne Bridge.

In Brisbane, Eddie Groves is frank in his assessment of the changes to child care policy.

Eddie Groves: Well I think their main focus when they first came into power was to try to save as much money as they could. They looked at health, and they looked at child care, those were the two expenses that were spiralling out of control. Now we've seen what they've done with age care and with health, and child care was the next situation. I think they had misguided approaches, they had a lot of theory and not necessarily the theory was going to work. The payment to the family situation, the families didn't want it; once they did the survey, 80% of families said 'No, we don't want the money, give it to the child care centre' which is what we were always telling them. The 50-hour issue, where they limited the amount of child care assistance to long-day care, they said they wouldn't hurt the middle-class or working family, and that particular one hurt exactly those people, the working-class and the middle-income family, no question about it.

Chris Bullock: Like many in the non-profit sector, Eddie Groves believes the main beneficiaries of rising fees in child care centres will be the so-called 'backyard' carers.

Eddie Groves: People will look for a cheaper alternative. As they look for a cheaper alternative, then the standard of care is certainly not going to be as high as it is now, and that's exactly what's happened over the ten years: we're going to go full circle to a point where we've put in so many regulations, so many standards, so much into accreditation, so much into increasing wages, so everybody's had their little piece of the pie. All that's going to happen is to push the parents out of the formal sector, boom! into an area which is unregulated. And Queensland doesn't have any regulations for informal care. So I mean where are the children going to go? And I think that's the biggest danger.

Chris Bullock: Eddie Groves' warning will ring bells for those who remember the horror stories of the 1950s and '60s, when there was no formal child care, and some parents would leave children locked in apartments while they worked.

The push for regulations at that time was led by pre-school associations, worried about the standard of informal care. Today an estimated 180,000 children under the age of five are being looked after in home-based, informal care. These are the everyday babysitting arrangements made between families and friends, as well as the money-making neighbourhood ventures. But not to be confused with Family Day Care, which is a government-funded and licensed home-based scheme.

It's the neighbourhood ventures that are contentious. Everyone who works in child care will tell you there are more and more of them, but it's difficult to be sure.

The best measure is to count the Medicare provider numbers that are issued, because a provider number allows a carer to charge an hourly fee on which parents can claim a cash rebate.

The problem is the patchwork of State regulations. Most States required home-based carers to be licensed if they're looking after more than four children, but in Queensland there is no limit or license required, and it has the fastest-growing informal sector in the country, doubling between 1995 and 1997.

Although thousands of children are safely cared for every day in what's known as 'backyard care', the lack of regulations in Queensland have become a source of growing concern for the industry.

The Queensland Government can only act if it gets a formal complaint.

Mike Wills is the Director of the Queensland Office of Child Care.

Mike Wills: Some are just looking after two children, some as many as eight, ten, and of course some - it's not often - but as high as 20.

Chris Bullock: But it's not something that you would know anything about unless you got a complaint.

Mike Wills: Yes it is based on complaints by parents or others who have concerns about it. We mustn't underestimate the power of parents to choose and to monitor the quality of care provided to their own children. If on complaint our officers go there, very often the phenomenon is that this person has been providing good care for large numbers of children for a long time, parents know this, parents freely choose, why is the State interfering, why don't you let parents again continue to freely choose? Now there's some validity in that argument, but when we say to them 'What if there are 100 children being looked after there?' They say, 'No, no, no, there have got to be standards.' 'If there are 50 children?' 'Oh no, that's far too many.' 'If there are 20 children?' 'Well, it may be.' So in other words, the concept of having standards is agreed to, but how they should be put in practice.

You've got to remember too that some home-based care providers provide very good standards of care in the informal sector, and some not quite so good. They're the ones that we get the complaints about, so it's totally unfair to think that all informal child care is inappropriate or poor standard.

Chris Bullock: Many parents want their children in home-based care because they believe it's the closest thing to the child's own home. Or it could be the only option where there's a shortage of formal care.

For Craig and Tanya Ludlow, it was a bit of both. They live in a bushy, middle-class Brisbane suburb. Two years ago, Tanya was looking for a place for eight-month-old Alexandra.

Tanya Ludlow: We wanted somewhere that was - I didn't want Alex in a day care centre, I wanted her in a home with a home-based carer.

Chris Bullock: Why was that?

Tanya Ludlow: I just felt it was more homely, it was more closer to how you'd bring up kids if you're going to be home looking after them yourself. She'd been cared for by my sister, so she was used to that family-type environment. I didn't like the idea of day care centres, I don't know why, I just didn't like the idea of the day care centres. But putting all that aside, we had to find a place for Alex. All the day care centres were full when we needed to place her. I tried to put our name down at the registered day care centres; two places wouldn't take my name at all, they said there was a 12-month wait and to ring back in a year, and one was six months late.

So we asked around the neighbourhood. The carer came with very good references; most of the kids had been there since like they were - one had actually been there from three months till when she was seven. She kept going back for after-school care. We spoke to probably three or four other parents that had their kids there, and nobody had a problem. She was wonderful. I went and saw her; I phoned her first to see if she had a vacancy, she said she did, I went and saw her, took Alex with me, Alex went straight to her and there wasn't any problem. It was a very family environment, she had seven children of her own and they all seemed really well brought up, really well mannered, and they all just loved Alex the first time I went there.

Chris Bullock: So it was a natural decision for you almost.

Tanya Ludlow: It basically was. There was no reason to think that Alex would be in danger.

Chris Bullock: On a spring afternoon in Brisbane, Alexandra's child care went terribly wrong.

Tanya Ludlow: Alex died in the bath at her day care mother's place. She drowned and she was scalded at the same time. We don't know whether the scald caused her to drown, or she received the scald after she drowned. We were told from police statements that two four-year-olds took her out of her cot, undressed her, put her in the bath and turned on the hot-water tap, which scalded her.

Chris Bullock: And when the police told you that there were 13 children there, did that surprise you or did you already know that?

Tanya Ludlow: No, I was stunned, absolutely stunned.

Chris Bullock: What the carer was doing was quite legal in Queensland. At the coronial inquest she declined to answer questions, on the grounds she might incriminate herself, and the coroner made an open finding.

Coroner (actor reading): I find that sometime in the afternoon, the child was placed in the bathtub and subsequently drowned. I am unable to find what the circumstances were within the household immediately before or at the time the child was placed in the bathtub, including who physically did so.

It would be imprudent of me to make comments in that regard, which would amount to speculation. I am unable to find such evidence of a criminal nature, and accordingly no person is committed for trial.

Chris Bullock: Coroner Gary Casey said he would look at the State's laws and decide if he should make a recommendation for change. The baby's mother, Tanya Ludlow, expected that he would.

Tanya Ludlow: Queensland is the only State that doesn't require carers to have a Medicare provider number to be registered with - well basically to have a limit on the children they can look after. And I had thought that the Coroner would come back and say that needs to be looked at. But yes, Medicare, if you get a Medicare provider number there has to be some limit on the number of children you can have that you can care for.

Chris Bullock: Three months later, Coroner Casey said this:

Coroner (actor reading): I concede the legislation is ineffectual; however it is not practicable, for obvious reasons, to be seen to interfere with private arrangements between parents and a trusted carer.

Chris Bullock: In other States, the authorities will interfere, insisting on a license for any private arrangements involving more than four fee-paying children. But in Queensland, Coroner Casey found that the parents, not the State, should be the arbiters of standards.

In the end, Craig and Tanya Ludlow decided not to pursue a case against the carer because, as they said, it wouldn't bring Alexandra back.

The growth of informal care causes dismay amongst people in the child care industry, but it goes to the heart of the present debate, about choice. The word is used and abused constantly, from the parents' right to choose their preferred child care, to the parents' right to choose to stay at home. One person's 'lack of choice' is another's 'freedom of choice'.

Some women are saying they can't choose work and child care any more because they can't afford to. On the other hand, Liberal MP and Lyons Forum member, John Bradford has a different perspective.

John Bradford: We've had Governments who've engaged in the past in social engineering to a very large extent, by almost forcing women into the workforce for one reason or another, or facilitating their entry into the workforce. Now I mean in my view, Government policies shouldn't do that any more than it should do the opposite. But the fact is the research I've shown says that women with young children, by and large, would prefer to remain out of the workforce, it's a choice they'd like to make, but very often is the choice they haven't been able to make up until now.

Chris Bullock: Can I ask you what research that is?

John Bradford: Oh well I would be hard-pressed to sort of refer to a particular document, but they're areas that I've read a lot on, and I suppose it's mostly conservative or traditional type research that I've read. But I've certainly seen surveys that indicate a very large percentage of women with young children are quite torn when they have to leave them at a child care centre and go off to work. And if it were economically possible, I mean that's the goal I think, for them to make a choice to stay out of the workforce, then a large number of them would.

Chris Bullock: For many women it's very difficult to leave the workforce for three years after establishing a career, and go back, given the rate of change of technology and workplace flexibility requirements and so on. Do you not concede that that can cause great difficulties in career structures and career aspirations?

John Bradford: Yes, I concede that that is a difficulty but we're going through rapidly changing times; we've got very high unemployment, and I guess if people are out of the workforce for very good reasons then in theory at least that opens up a job for somebody else. I'm not blaming women for the unemployment problems but of course the fact is that we've had rapidly increasing participation rates of women in the workforce, and of course at the same time the participation rates of men have tended to go down a little.

Chris Bullock: There is a view, cynical or otherwise that would suggest that what's happening is that women are leaving work because they feel they don't have any choice, for financial reasons, they're staying at home and looking after kids rather than putting them into child care. They're then vacating jobs, they're not going to show up as unemployed even though they'd like to be working; that this works both ways.

John Bradford: Well I don't think that's really the Government's intention to sort of social engineer in that way. I think what we are doing is simply I think neutralising the amount of social engineering that used to go on, by giving people real choices. And I think that really in the end, nobody can disagree with that. I mean the extreme feminists don't like the idea, or they like the idea of choice up to a point, but they don't want women to have too many choices because they essentially believe that women should be in the workforce. But our philosophy, and certainly my own personal philosophy is that families should have choices, and I'd be about giving financial assistance to families, and allowing them to determine whether they spend that on child care, formal child care arrangements if they want to, or whether in fact it allows one of the parents to make the choice to stay out of the workforce and coincidentally, make a place for someone else in the workforce. But to be making the choice to stay home I think in the end, they're playing a very valuable role in the development of their own young children.

Chris Bullock: The guiding principle for John Bradford and the Lyons Forum, is taken from Dame Enid Lyons' maiden speech to Federal Parliament in 1943: 'The foundation of a nation's greatness is in the homes of its people.'

The Forum, which includes several senior Government Ministers, likes to keep a low profile, but does make its voice heard on family policy.

John Bradford.

John Bradford: Well it did have, I think, a very significant impact on the pro-family policies that the current Government adopted prior to the last election. I think since the election in practice, the Forum has become less influential and I think that's just simply because many of our senior members are now Ministers or have other responsibilities, and obviously they're very much in a situation where they're either a) very busy, or b) have to toe the Party line very carefully; and so the Forum can't be in that sense as pro-active as it used to be. But it's still bubbling along, and I suspect that it's still quite influential.

Chris Bullock: The Minister for Family Services, Warwick Smith, is not a member of the Lyons Forum.

Warwick Smith: Well firstly I say the Liberal Party represents a broad range of opinion, and the Lyons Forum is one group within the Liberal Party, it's pro-family, aggressively so, as are we all. I haven't found a politician yet in Australia, regardless of which ideology they wear, who isn't pro-family, supporting family, so I sort of reject that --

Chris Bullock: But is it the Government's view that many women are looking for the opportunity to get out of the workforce?

Warwick Smith: Well I don't believe so. We're about providing choice. I mean I think it's fair to say that the Liberal Party has very strongly supported the concept of choice for people to opt to work or opt not to work, and where they opt to work, we have a commitment to a child care system, formal child care system, accredited, properly planned, properly funded, which will enable that choice to be fulfilled.

So I mean, allegations that the Liberal Party wants to bring the child care system to an end, this is rejected as not being borne out by the facts, not in accord with our election policies and certainly in the period since I've been in public life, it's something that I feel confident has never been a feature or been expressed by any of my colleagues.

Chris Bullock: There are very few people in the child care industry who argue that the Government is trying to bring the system to an end. Rather people fear that by the way it's trying to reign in the costs the Government is forcing an 'economic choice' on parents.

Sue Tolley has a broader view than most on parents' child care preferences. She oversees a Long Day Care Centre and a Family Day Care Scheme in Sydney for the childrens' charity, Barnados. Sue Tolley agrees the Government inherited a problem, but she doesn't agree with their solution.

Sue Tolley: We did have a situation where there was a massive blowout, which the Government hadn't predicted, and it had to be fixed. But of course the Government that's come in to try and fix this problem, has got a different agenda, has got a different philosophy. Reading between the lines, looking at what has actually happened so far since the Liberal Government has come in, we have seen an exodus of women from the workforce because they can't afford the increased child care fees. I don't believe that was unintentional, I'm sorry. I do believe that that was part of the agenda, but without having to say so. And it hasn't happened accidentally, it has happened because it was the only thing that could happen. If you start putting fees up, there's going to be many families who are going to sit back down and look at their budgets and realise that every penny they earnt last week went in child care, so why do it?

Women haven't gone back to home because they wanted to go back home, they've gone back for economic reasons.

Chris Bullock: Child care historian and public policy adviser Dr Deborah Brennan, thinks the Howard Government has misjudged the role child care plays in Australia today.

Deborah Brennan: Well I think it's potentially a very significant issue for many families, and particularly for those families that John Howard likes to characterise as 'the battlers'. Many of those are families that are struggling to hang on to their jobs and bring up their children and pay their mortgages, and if child care becomes unaffordable, that can build up a pretty huge level of anger and resentment.

I think that this Government may to some extent have miscalculated, in that I think it regarded the push for child care as something that was driven very much by feminists, and the Government I think sees feminists as somehow outside of the community. But child care is very much a mainstream issue now, it's not just something that's demanded by ideologues, it's something that is desired and expected by ordinary Australian families.

Chris Bullock: Sitting at home in the western suburbs of Melbourne, Diane is struggling to come to terms with life without work.

Diane: I grew up in a migrant Greek family where my parents both worked, they had their own business, and my grandmother lived with us, and my aunt. I suppose my parents never really had to worry about the things that I worry about, which is placing my children in adequate care, and it's been an ongoing dilemma for me. There is this myth that people do have extended family, and a lot of the people that I know who have young children, do not have family. The family are in Queensland, Tasmania, New Zealand and there often is nothing for them except paid care, and you don't have the opportunity to subsidise care as much as you would like with family. So it can get pretty difficult at times, yes.

THEME

Chris Bullock: Production Co-ordinator on Background Briefing is Linda McGinness; Research, Vanessa Muir; Technical Producer, Greg Richardson; and the Executive Producer is Kirsten Garrett. I'm Chris Bullock.

THEME
	

Source: [[ABC Radio National - Background Briefing: 22 February  1998  - Child Care Pains|http://www.abc.net.au/rn/talks/bbing/stories/s10421.htm]]
Sundays at 9.10am, repeated Tuesdays at 7.10pm
Child-Care Profits
Sunday 3 October  2004 
Produced by Gerald Tooth

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Program Transcript

Gerald Tooth: Right now, childcare is at the centre of an almighty political tussle. At the sharp end of the election campaign, both sides have made billion-dollar pledges to make childcare more accessible. John Howard is offering you 30% tax rebates on childcare expenses. Mark Latham is offering one free day a week.

As the rivers of public cash flow into childcare, who’s going to benefit the most? Will it be parents who can go back to work? Or children who get started on early learning programs, or will it be the new breed of childcare centre owners who can’t believe their luck? Questions to ask your child-care centre

Eddy Groves: Really, the federal government in Australia has got it nailed. That 30% rebate has definitely come out of the blue and that’s remarkable.

Gerald Tooth: Welcome to the world of the crèche crusaders like Eddy Groves from ABC Learning Centres. They have taken the stock market by storm and instigated a revolution in the way childcare services are being delivered across Australia.

But unless you’ve been paying close attention to the finance news in recent times you may not have noticed it.
ABC News 9/9/04

    Juanita Phillips: … here’s Alan Kohler with the details.

    Alan Kohler: Most of the action on the share market today was in the childcare business. The three biggest listed operators of crèches, ABC Learning Centres, Childcare Centres of Australia and Peppercorn Management, announced a three-way merger with ABC on top. Now the share prices of all three went up, but the big winner was Peppercorn, and there was also a bit of interest in Qantas…

Gerald Tooth: The once cottage industry of childcare, run by not-for-profit organisations and small private operators, is being rapidly corporatised. That is, large stock market listed companies have flooded into the sector which they see as a goldmine of profit opportunity. It might be good news for you, if you’re an investor, but is it good news for you and your children if you’re a parent?

Welcome to Radio National’s Background Briefing. I’m Gerald Tooth.

Today’s program will give you a disturbing look inside Australia’s childcare industry, and asks those of you that are parents if you really know what’s going on once you’ve dropped your children off. We’ll also be offering some advice on how you can find out.

But first we’ll try and outline for you the major tensions within the sector. They centre on the argument that childcare should be nothing more than the vital first step in the education of our young, and the competing view that it should also be OK to make a lot of money while you’re doing that.

It’s what some are calling the childcare paradox.

Last month’s announcement that the three major corporate players in the Australian childcare industry are merging, is the latest chapter in the extraordinarily successful story of ABC Learning Centres.

ABC Learning Centres is headed up by Brisbane-based Eddy Groves and his wife Le Neve. The former milkman now owns the Brisbane Bullets Basketball team and has an estimated personal wealth of $175-million. Most of that has been made from childcare.

Eddy Groves: The sheer growth of this company, when you look at where we came from in 2001, we had a market capital of about $25-million, and after this merger, the market capital I believe will be about $1-billion. And the fact of being able to do that in four or five years has been quite remarkable, so certainly there’s been growth for people if they’re looking to invest.

Gerald Tooth: Where does the growth end?

Eddy Groves: Well, I’m not sure that it does.

Gerald Tooth: Incredible growth is the defining feature of ABC Learning Centres.

Eddy Groves set up the company in 1988. In 2001 he floated it on the stock market. At that stage he owned 31 childcare centres in South East Queensland. Now, just three years later, he’s got 750 right across Australia.

For original investors, the value of their stock has increased tenfold.

Yet in contrast to the bright economic predictions there are also those that are saying that childcare is a sick industry. They argue that it’s based on an unsustainably low wage structure and poor working conditions that have led to chronic staff shortages which impact on children.

Pam Cahir is the National Director of Early Childhood Australia, a Canberra-based advocacy group.
"If you can’t actually provide conditions in which children can be guaranteed to grow and develop, you’ve got a sector that’s really in trouble."

Pam Cahir: I think we’re sitting on the back of something that could collapse. If you can’t get people to work in a sector, if you can’t actually provide conditions in which children can be guaranteed to grow and develop well, you’ve got a sector that’s really in trouble, and I believe the sector is in trouble, and I think until, I’ve almost got to the point of saying, I don’t mind if people won’t work in childcare, until we actually make it so hard for people to get care, then I don’t think parents will say that we’re willing to pay more, of the government will say that we’re willing to bear some of the burden of the cost of paying people well.

Gerald Tooth: Pam Cahir says this is an industry-wide problem. Others however, point to the emergence of the corporate sector as the driver behind a fundamental culture change in childcare.

Jennifer is an Early Childhood educator who teaches childcare workers. She was previously the director of a centre. She has asked not to be identified. As an educator, Jennifer spends a lot of time in childcare centres where her students complete the practical component of their training. She says she’s often troubled by what she sees.

Jennifer: A centre that I visited, a student that we had [there], I witnessed staff saying to a toddler who was no more than 16 months, ‘You will lie on your bed, I don’t care if your mother rocks you to sleep, that’s not how we do it here’. And the toddler was extremely traumatised by the whole process. And that went on for something like 30 minutes. And I think that that really is affecting the children in terms of their development and their ability to learn, and their happiness, and parents are so uninformed about what is good quality care, that they don’t know what’s going on in centres, and that’s the scary part.

Gerald Tooth: Jennifer has a unique viewpoint from where she can comprehensively survey the landscape in this sector. The 300-odd students she supervises are placed throughout the industry. She visits large numbers of them at work in both private for-profit centres and community not-for-profit organisations.

Jennifer: All of the examples that I’ve seen have all been in privately run centres, and the majority of the examples, not all of them, but the majority of the examples I’ve seen have been run by the larger institutes.

Gerald Tooth: We’re talking about ABC and Peppercorn, are we?

Jennifer: Yes. So they’re either managed by Peppercorn of they’re ABC Centres.

Gerald Tooth: A little history here.

There are around four-and-a-half-thousand day care centres across Australia. Traditionally the sector was dominated by small-scale operators, community run not-for-profit organisations and small privately-run centres.

But in 1997 the Howard Government scrapped direct subsidies to not-for-profit childcare centres and in a single stroke, childcare was changed. Where around 40% of government funding had gone directly to centres, now all of it went to parents through Child Care Benefit payments, that they pass on to the centre of their choice. With access to a new funding stream, private centres boomed and with the not-for-profits decimated, childcare was opened up as a lucrative field for profit making.

Seven years later, the government has more than doubled its childcare spend and the childcare sector is now seen as an industry, a multi-billion dollars industry. And it’s the new corporate players that dominate, with their shareholder backing, management systems and economies of scale. And it’s all happened in the mere blink of an eye.

ABC Learning Centres led the way as the first to list on the Stock Exchange just three years ago in 2001. Others quickly followed: Child Care Centres Australia, FutureOne, Peppercorn Management Group and Hutchison’s Childcare services,

With the recent merger of ABC Learning Centres, Peppercorn and Child Care Centres Australia, Eddy Groves’ company will now control 750 centres. And as he said earlier, he reckons the company will soon be worth a billion dollars.

Meanwhile, most childcare workers are paid $10 to $12 an hour. That’s about $22,000 to $25,000 a year.

There are those that are arguing that the childcare entrepreneurs have built their castles on a foundation that is both morally and structurally flimsy.

Pam Cahir of Early Childhood Australia.

Pam Cahir: What’s happening in childcare services is happening in all childcare services right now, that is, you can’t get staff, you certainly can’t get qualified staff, you can get casual staff, the turnover of staff is enormous, and there are major issues around the training of staff that we’re getting. And staff are poorly paid, the conditions are awful, there is no career path in the sector, and so there are a lot of fundamentals to get right before you start worrying about who’s actually providing the care. In my view now, I don’t think it’s appropriate or OK for parents to go to work on the back of the wages of poorly paid staff in childcare services, I don’t think it’s OK for services to have ratios of one to five for babies. I mean I can’t imagine looking after five babies, I just think that’s just an impossible task, and if you had quadruplets in this country you’d get support. So there are some quite fundamental things that you have to get right in order for us to actually set this sector OK.

Gerald Tooth: Pam Cahir, National Director of Early Childhood Australia.

Eddy Groves dismisses the claims that the corporate’ stunning success rests on the back of lowly-paid workers who have to endure poor workplace conditions. He says his staff are happy and they’re not going anywhere.

Eddy Groves: Our staff turnover now, the personnel who work in the centres, those people, that turnover in the industry is about 30% to 40%. Ours is now 7-1/2%. So consistency of people that work in the centres creates consistency for the children and the families, and reinvestment into the facilities, and we reinvested about $30-million since we’ve listed. Do those two things, have the right location and you’ll have good occupancies. If you have good occupancies where you’re 95%, then you’ll make money, it’s as simple as that. So you have to have the occupancies to make money, it’s not the other way around.

Gerald Tooth: Eddy Groves of ABC Learning Centres.

Childcare workers are currently battling in the Industrial Relations Courts in Victoria, South Australia and the ACT for wage rises. The childcare entrepreneurs are opposing them.
If low wages are one pillar of the childcare business, government funding is the other.

The Federal Government already pours $1.7-billion a year into childcare through the Child Care Benefit payments. ABC Learning Centre’s business plan relies on these taxpayer dollars for 50% of its revenue.

As we said earlier, government spending on childcare has doubled over the last five years, and that’s not taking into account the billion dollars or so extra promised by both sides of politics in this election campaign.

You’re listening to Background Briefing on ABC Radio National. I’m Gerald Tooth. And head in the program you’ll hear from a former corporate childcare board member, who tells of sleepless nights over ethical dilemmas over profits coming before children. And you’ll also hear a list of questions you should be asking your childcare provider so you can assess the quality of the service you’re getting.

The debate about the privatisation of Telstra has been endless and consumed hundreds of hours of parliamentary debate and produced kilometres of newspaper copy, but when it comes to the question of whether we should be selling shares in how we raise our children there has only been the merest of squeaks.

At the Australian Council for Educational Research, the Research Director of Early Childhood Education is Alison Elliott.

Alison Elliott: The Commonwealth doesn’t assume full responsibility for early childhood care and education, it never has, and I think we as a society have to decide whether it’s something we want to assume as a community. Do we believe it’s really important for early childhood care and education to be funded by us as taxpayers or is it something that should be private enterprise, funded by the commercial sector for profit? It’s like saying children over five are able to access taxpayer funded government schools, they’re able to access quality teachers who are qualified, but children of four years and eleven months don’t have access to those same sorts of services. "The Commonwealth doesn’t assume full responsibility for early childhood care and education, it never has…"

Gerald Tooth: Dr Elliott says we need to think hard about what we want from childcare. Do we want child-mining services, or do we want a properly structured early childhood education system? In other words, she asks, do we want childcare to become an integrated part of the schooling process?

As the use of childcare has skyrocketed in Australia, 80% of the country’s four-year-olds are now spending some time in some form of care each week, and she asks, do we want that care to be run by well-trained professionals who can properly guide a child’s development at that critical time. She says we need to make that shift from the touchstone that ‘mother knows best’, the idea that childcare workers need to know better. With that in mind, she argues, that it’s almost impossible to produce maximum quality educational childcare for children if you’ve also got to generate profits for shareholders, operators and owners,

Alison Elliott: The concern in any business is to maximise profit and maximise profit taking for the company that’s concerned, and the reality is, even the most elite private school is a non-profit organisation, where all fees and any other income raised by that group, is ploughed back into the education of children. This is just not the case for childcare centres that are private for profit, where they need to make a profit in order to, in the case of those with shareholders, they have to give that money back to the shareholders.

Gerald Tooth: As we said earlier, it’s an argument that Eddy Groves rejects. He says parents vote with their feet, and his high occupancy levels prove that he is providing a quality product.

There could also be other reasons for high occupancy such as supply not meeting demand. Across Australia there are more than 100,000 children who miss out on childcare places each year. They are the statistic behind the lengthy waiting lists.

If you are a parent who has found a place for your child, how do you make a judgment about whether you’ve found a quality service? How can you find out what goes on in a centre when you’re not there?

From what we’ve been told at Background Briefing, there are far too many disturbing stories about children not being treated properly.

While we’re not suggesting that the sort of stories you’re about to hear are universal, people from within the industry report a widespread pattern of concerning incidents. And again, while we’re not suggesting that it happens in every corporate-run centre, there is evidence of unacceptable treatment of children in that sector.

As we said earlier, Jennifer, as an educator of childcare workers, is someone who goes into a very large number of childcare centres and observes conditions as she assesses her students.

There are hundreds of centres in the region where she teaches. She says that through bitter experience, her institution has learned that only a mere fraction of those centres provide positive learning experiences for their students.

Jennifer: There are 25 that we’ve acknowledged as being high quality centres, which is a scary number, considering that there’s probably over 250 or 300 that we could use. So it makes it very difficult when we’re trying to place students and give them good role models.

Gerald Tooth: You’re saying that out of every ten childcare centres out there, you’re only comfortable placing students in one.

Jennifer: Yes. So I think that’s fairly scary.

Gerald Tooth: Jennifer says the students also bring back troubling stories from their time working within centres.

Jennifer: Frightening ones. We’ve just had a review, at the end of every semester we interview our students, and some students were telling us stories of children being put into corners and told that until they could actually behave properly and do what everybody else was doing, then they weren’t allowed to rejoin the group. Children’s penises being compared on baby tables, and staff having a good giggle about how big one is and how small the other one is, and some people may say, ‘But look, that’s all harmless, the infants don’t know what’s going on’, and that has been the comments from people outside the field. But that’s not what we know. Where does an infant have their dignity when they’re lying on a change table completely naked and there’s two women comparing the sizes of their penises? I mean seriously.

Gerald Tooth: Eddy Groves rejects any suggestion that anything untoward is happening within ABC Learning Centres.

Eddy Groves: It’s just mindblowing that they think a public company would be trying to break the law, I mean it’s just unbelievable. That’s the other thing that should give people comfort, that we have ongoing disclosure, we’re publicly listed, we have far more regulations than any of these other companies have to deal with. I mean I’m going to go jail because I’m not doing something right.

Gerald Tooth: Background Briefing has heard numerous accounts from childcare students about their experiences when placed in centres. While many of them had positive enriching experiences there were far too many who spoke of behaviour that is unacceptable in a professional care environment.

Here is a small sample of those accounts:

    Student 1: They never washed the children’s hands. They never had a program in the room. They only read about three books for children the whole time I was there. The only activities the children did were painting. There were maybe three times they did something different. The Director came into the room and talked to the others about why a boy in my room had been taken from his family by Family Services, and how sexy a Dad is. They never let the children decide what they want to eat, they talked in front of children about how their parents were on drugs and how dumb they were. One of the older children has autism and has very bad behaviour. The Director saw him doing something wrong so he picked him up by the collar of his shirt, and carried him across the playground by his shirt.

    Student 2: I really don’t have many nice things to say about this centre and its practices. The one practice I did like was they played music all day. Children are free and often do sing along to these. From being at this centre, I have observed low quality care and I have no idea how they passed accreditation. I practiced what I have learnt and used my instincts. For example, when told I need to yell at the children, I didn’t. My personal philosophy is that children need to be in a loving, caring environment with support and challenges, not somewhere with no or poor supervision and where they leave children to cry alone when missing their parents.

    Student 3: There were many occasions where I always broke into tears, because of the way the children were treated. At this centre, I felt trapped and uncomfortable. I am glad ‘prac’ is over. I know that sounds bad, but the experience was not enjoyable with regards to the quality and practices, in my opinion. I enjoyed the children more than anything though.

Gerald Tooth: So where are the authorities when all this is going on?

To operate, a childcare centre must have both a state licence and Commonwealth accreditation. Parents naturally take confidence from those bits of paper being prominently displayed on centre walls.

But is that confidence misplaced?

Larry Anthony is the Federal Minister for Children and Youth Affairs. He says he keeps a close eye on problems in childcare through feedback he gets from the Commonwealth’s watchdog.

Larry Anthony: Well what I always monitor is the actual number of written complaints that are made to the National Accreditation Council, run by John Tainton, and I follow that quite closely, so whilst we might hear anecdotal, when it actually comes down to people making a formal complaint, it drops away quite dramatically. And I’ve got to say that with the accreditation process, it’s been very vigorous, and we’re seeing now that childcare centres, yes, if they’re accredited and they can get that accreditation for a number of years. But there are mother means that we do, which I’m not going to talk on your program to ensure that if we do have concerns with particular centres, that we can closely monitor and follow up.

Gerald Tooth: Why don’t you explain to parents that are listening to our program how you can reassure them that those centres are being monitored properly?

Larry Anthony: Well I think most parents are pretty reassured that the childcare sector is working well, and the clear validation for that is that more and more parents want to put their kids into childcare. So that has not come through, that parents are concerned about standards in any large proportion.

Gerald Tooth: The National Childcare Accreditation Council received 400 phone complaints in the last financial year. There were just 50 written complaints, which is the figure the Minister is choosing to use when he says there aren’t many.

The Chair of the Accreditation Council is John Tainton. He paints a very different picture. He says nearly 5% of operating childcare centres in Australia don’t come up to scratch. That is, one in every 20 don’t pass accreditation inspections.

John Tainton: We monitor the standards in every childcare service in Australia. At the present time there’s about 4.8% of childcare centres in Australia that are unaccredited because they’re not meeting our standards at the present time.
"There’s about 4.8% of childcare centres in Australia that are unaccredited because they’re not meeting our standards at the present time."

Gerald Tooth: That’s a lot.

John Tainton: Well, that’s the way it is. I mean we’re tough, we don’t mess around if we find a childcare service is not meeting the right standards for accreditation, we don’t accredit them. And what we do when we find a service like that, is to advise Commonwealth funded resource and advisory and training agencies we tried our best to connect them with the service and to assist the service through those support agencies as far as possible to raise their standards. Some agencies resist that kind of help, they think they can do it all themselves, that’s their business, I mean they’re adults, they have to stand on their own feet.

But at the end of the day if a childcare service is not meeting the standards to satisfy the accreditation system, the families will receive letters indicating the childcare benefit could be withdrawn; this has happened, it’s not just an idle threat that’s there, it has happened in several instances, and it has quite dramatic results.

Gerald Tooth: The watchdog arrangements that are in place for childcare across Australia are frankly, best described as a dog’s breakfast.

Responsibilities are divided between the Commonwealth and the states. Licensing at the state and territory level controls things like staff to child ratios, the sorts of qualifications staff must have, the size of rooms and equipment levels. Each state has its own regime that sets its own differing standards.

For example, the ratio of carers to children in babies’ rooms in New South Wales is one to five. In Queensland it’s one to four. Group leaders in Queensland must be two-year trained, in New South Wales, three year trained.

The national accreditation system sits on top of the state licensing system. They concern themselves with quality assurance. That is, what is done in centres, as opposed to what is there. In other words, how programs are delivered and what are their outcomes.

The National Childcare Accreditation Council is the watchdog with real teeth. Parents can only get Child Care Benefits if they send their children to an accredited centre. No accreditation, no payments.

The NCAC growls a lot but it rarely bites, and like a dog that only barks when its owners are not home, that growling happens well out of the earshot of parents.

Once very two-and-a-half years, each childcare centre must obtain accreditation. It does this through a process of self-assessment that is followed by one, and only one, inspection by authorities.

If a centre fails accreditation, it’s given 12 months to get its act together. It’s only if it still doesn’t come up to scratch that parents are notified. Under this system a serious problem in a childcare centre could fester for more than three years before the watchdog alerts parents.

John Tainton: Families get very concerned at the thought of a withdrawal of childcare benefit, and it’s interesting that they tend to focus their energies then on the service itself. What’s happening here, what’s happening to my children here? Which to me is the sort of question that parents ought to be asking all the time. I don’t think they should be waiting until a problem arises, but they really need to satisfy themselves about what’s happening.

Gerald Tooth: But under that system that’s in place with you, it could be six months or 12 months before they’ll get a letter alerting them to the fact that there is an accreditation issue at their childcare centre, that’s a long time in that zero to four age group, 12 months can be a very long time if you’re getting a poor service.

John Tainton: You can say it’s a long time, it’s not as though nothing is happening over that period. There’s a lot of resource and energy being poured in the direction of that service if they want to pick up on it, so that they can build up their accreditation standards during that period of time. We’re not operating as a big stick organisation, we’re not trying to prise child care benefits away from child care centres, it’s our mission in life to make sure that the quality for children is there. Our logo I guess is ‘Putting children first’, and that’s what we work at all the time.

Gerald Tooth: In other words, you had better not rely on the Federal accreditation agency to let you know if there’s a problem in your childcare centre. It’s your job to find out for yourself.

Alison Elliott is the Research Director in Early Childhood Education at ACER, the Australian Council for Educational Research. She says while most parents indicate they are concerned about issues of quality in childcare centres, converting that concern into action is a different thing, especially when often they are simply relieved to have got off the waiting lists and found a place for their child.

Alison Elliott: Once they’re there, they’re very interested in quality and they are interested in quality, but nevertheless they’re desperate to get a place, and if they get one, they’re so exhausted, having looked so hard, and then they’re back at work. "Once they’re [families] there, they’re very interested in quality, but nevertheless they’re desperate to get a place." They’re not able to be advocates or be involved in lobby groups. Families are busy, they’re dealing with day-to-day child rearing work, and the families who are using early services are probably the busiest of the lot because they’re driving to work, they’re then having to go and pick the kids up, and drop them off, then maybe going to two or three early childhood services, they might be dropping one kid off at child care in the morning, then dropping another child off at school, and then going and picking somebody up from childcare, and then picking the other child up from out of school hours care, they’re driving all round the city, terrified they’re going to be a few minutes late and then get fined $10 a minute because they’ve picked their child up late from out of school hours care. It’s a very tough life out there for parents.

Gerald Tooth: At ABC Learning Centres, Eddy Groves has his own criticisms of the accreditation system.

Eddy Groves: I think it’s too divorced from the fact that you have state legislation as well. I mean you have state legislation, you have local government approval and then you have Federal government accreditation; I think it could be better. I think it comes down to a lot of opinion. I think it comes down to a lot of personal belief in what they think a childcare centre should be, instead of following what’s there. So it certainly could be improved and I’ve said that for years.

Gerald Tooth: And there are other serious criticisms of the failing of the accreditation system from within the industry.

The fact that validation inspections are only made once every 2-1/2 years, and extensive notice is given for those inspections, is seen as a major weakness, and what’s more, a weakness that is being cynically exploited by corporate childcare companies.

This is what early childhood educator, Jennifer, has to say about accreditation.

Jennifer: They know in advance the day that the reviewer will be coming, and so some of the examples I’ve seen are truckloads of toys being shipped from centre to centre, so that the resource levels are at a very high standard. And then the day after the reviewer is gone, those toys are then moved to either the next centre that’s getting reviewed, or shipped out to somewhere else. Also the staff are moved, so staff are moved from one centre to another centre to ensure that there are a high level of staff that are there, but it’s not a true indication. So until the accreditation system is allowed to actually do things like spot checks, where there is no preparation, there is no warning, then it becomes a farce.

Gerald Tooth: Tracey Kirk-Downey has been working in childcare for 20 years and is the New South Wales Secretary of NACBCS , the National Association of Community Based Children’s Services.

Tracey Kirk-Downey has also worked as a validator under the National Childcare Accreditation Council. In that role, she went into centres in New South Wales to carry out inspections. When Background Briefing spoke to her at an early childhood conference in Melbourne, she backed Jennifer’s story with her own experiences.

Tracey Kirk-Downey: We’re being told that it’s still happening across the state.

Gerald Tooth: Why is it clear to you that that was happening?

Tracey Kirk-Downey: Well as a reviewer, it’s very easy to see when the children are acting like a kid in a Christmas cave with all this new equipment, it’s like a feeding frenzy in the toyshop. The children aren’t, if they’re used that equipment being around, they’re very calm with it, they know how to use it, they move between activities very calmly. When there’s lots of new equipment brought in at one time where the children have not been using it before, it’s very obvious to see that it’s a new explosion for them, fighting with each other to try and have a turn of it. Normally if that stuff’s been there for a while, the children have already sorted all that stuff out, it’s not hard to figure out. And the staff that the children don’t know the names of. So that’s pretty easy to figure out as well, if they don’t know the staff’s name.

Gerald Tooth: So what you’re saying is despite the accreditation process, that in the private sector childcare operators are running centres that don’t meet the required standards. On a day to day basis, those centres don’t meet the required standards of legislation.

Tracey Kirk-Downey: Yes, that’s what happening, and there’s not a damn thing we can do about it.

Gerald Tooth: These stories of resource shifting to get centres up to scratch are totally rejected by ABC Learning Centres. Eddy Groves says while it’s a persistent story, it’s also an apocryphal one.

Eddy Groves: I’ve heard that as long as accreditation’s been in place. You know, you’ve heard that about the private childcare centre. Now it’s moved towards ABC, because ABC’s high profile. But while we were just private it was about the private childcare sector. I can only speak from ABC’s point of view, and I can only speak from when we were private and public. It’s just nonsense. I mean the amount of money that we have reinvested back in these centres in the last 12 months, centres that would never have had a cent spent on them, is unbelievable.

Gerald Tooth: But can you guarantee that that’s never happened?

Eddy Groves: I guarantee it. I can absolutely state categorically it’s never happened.

Gerald Tooth: In chasing down this story, Background Briefing could find no-one that had witnessed the actual shifting of resources. All those that we spoke to about this allegation had heard the story from someone else.

Meanwhile the Chairman of the Accreditation Council, John Tainton, notes the criticisms of the accreditation system but says things aren’t about to change.

John Tainton: We start from the assumption that we’re working with professionals in this field and we treat them as professionals and for that reason they do get notice when a validation visit is on, and the validation visit really is simply there to test out the self-study that the service has done for itself, and to pick up on issues that might be raised in the independent surveys from families. Two-and-a-half years, well that’s our present system. The system that we operated prior to that, since 1994, allowed some services to string out as much as five years between visits. We’ve tightened that right back to a neat 2-1/2 years, and no service will go over that time, they’re all visited within that 2-1/2 year time frame.

Gerald Tooth: And in answer to those calling for unannounced spot checks, John Tainton says he isn’t sure what they would achieve.
"When you ask them what they want spot checked, invariably the sort of issues they raise are licensing issues."

John Tainton: When you ask them what they want spot checked, invariably the sort of issues they raise are licensing issues rather than the issues that come under the quality assurance system, and our response to that is that through our protocols with the state and territory licensing authorities, if we receive a formal complaint about a service and it’s a spot check style issue, we’ll refer it to the licensing authority, and they do spot checks. So the spot checks happen about those kinds of things, things that relate to staff and equipment and spaces and ratios of staff and children and all of those sorts of things, they’re all licensing issues. And they’re the issues that are most readily picked up on with spot checks, and the protocols are there for the states to do it.

Gerald Tooth: The state bodies to whom he’s passing the buck are of course stretched very thin and unlike the National body, don’t have that crucial power to withdraw funding to centres that don’t come up to scratch.

One of the things not directly addressed by accreditation is how staff are treated within centres. Some staff are expected to supply their own materials for activities. Others have to do the cleaning and paperwork at the same time they’re expected to be supervising children.

Here’s another childcare student’s account of her experience in a centre.

    My time at the centre was a mix of worrying, cleaning and being left alone. I think that I was exposed to poor quality care. The staff were pleasant to me, but I felt that they were always trying to offload the jobs they didn’t want to me. I cleaned the bathroom very day, mopped and swept the floors, cleaned up after morning tea, and lunch, and afternoon tea, and packed the sheets away. I felt like I was working for the staff instead of with the staff.

Gerald Tooth: The National President of Early Childhood Australia is Judy Radich. She is also the Director of the Coolon Childcare Centre at Tweed Heads in Northern New South Wales.

Judy Radich says carers shouldn’t be cleaning. She has put in place staff support practices that she would like to see adopted across the country.

Judy Radich: My staff get paid release time to keep the children’s records so they get release time away from the children to do that. In other services, you’re expected to fit that in perhaps when the children were sleeping or perhaps when at night at home, and when you’re only being paid $25,000 to $27,000 a year I think it’s a really unrealistic expectation. My staff get their meals all provided, as the children get their meals, and we like them to eat with the children, so that’s a cost saving I guess for my staff. They get paid training, they get release time to go to training, and many other childcare services they don’t get those benefits.

Gerald Tooth: Well when you say many other childcare services don’t provide that, it’s most, isn’t it?

Judy Radich: It is most.

Gerald Tooth: What does that say about the industry itself?

Judy Radich: Well I think it says that we’re still perhaps stuck back there where it was nice young girls who worked with children and families and saw it as their duty just to work on and not think about it and not complain about it. And I think that’s one of our fundamental problems, is that we get, when we work in childcare, we get to know the children and families, so we don’t want to make a fuss, so we put up with things that perhaps aren’t right. I mean most childcare centres, the staff also have to do all of the cleaning. I mean in my service, we get commercial cleaners in at the end of every day. That impacts on just their status I guess, if you’re expected to mop out the bathroom and wash the floors every day, and wash the windows, as well as look after the children, I think there’s some really mixed messages there and many staff don’t seem to think about it, they just do it.

Gerald Tooth: Eddy Groves does expect staff at ABC Learning Centres to clean.

Eddy Groves: In some centres.

Gerald Tooth: Who looks after the children when the staff are doing the cleaning?

Eddy Groves: Well I mean it’s usually when the children are asleep or having a rest. You certainly have to do some cleaning during the day. You don’t just leave food on the floor, you don’t leave, if the children have had lunch, certainly you have to sweep up after the children, you have to mop those floors and you have to keep a hygiene area for the children.

Gerald Tooth: One of the main arguments put by those concerned about the rising influence of the corporate childcare companies is that quality services can’t be maintained when companies are focused on maximising profits for shareholders. And they point to these sort of cost-saving measures and the pressure they put on staff.

As we heard earlier, Eddy Groves’ response is you can’t make profits without offering a quality service.

Others in the field beg to differ.

Joy Goodfellow is an early childhood expert at Macquarie University. She recently wrote a paper titled ‘Is the marketplace influencing our view of the child?’ which focused on the shift in who is seen as ‘the consumer’ of childcare services. Once it was the child, now apparently, it’s the parent.

Joy Goodfellow is concerned that profit-driven childcare services have lost sight of just how critical it is for children’s development to build consistent, long-term relationships between children and childcare workers.

Joy Goodfellow: So where we have situations where an organisation is trying to cut its costs and salaries are the high cost, for example, in a not-for-profit organisation you could expect salary costs to be around 80% of their total budget. The corporate sector and the two corporates that I’ve looked at are Peppercorn and ABC Learning. They hope to keep their budgets down under 50%. So the way you keep your salary budget down under 50% is to think about the cost of staff in your centre. So you might want to employ people who have lesser qualification if your regulation allows you to do that. It might say you want to have higher numbers of casual staff so that you can then put those staff off if you don’t have the children there. It might mean that in a day you have only maybe a small handful of children left in the afternoon, so you say OK, we’ll group all those children together under this staff member, and send the other staff member home. So there are things, or practices that can occur that are I believe, detrimental to children but they are undertaken in order to economise.

Gerald Tooth: Eddy Groves is heartily sick of the allegation that his centres employ high numbers of casuals and have high staff turnover.

Eddy Groves: Well I’d love to see them come in and have a look at the books. I’m quite happy to open it up and show them. That’s just lunacy, we haven’t had casual people within the centres for years. That changed years and years ago. I mean childcare was heavily casualised for many years, but I think well back in about ’98, ’99, we converted all the people working in the centres to permanent. So all these things that they continue to grasp at, but I have all the statistics, and I’m happy to show anybody. But they don’t want to have that debate, they just want to say those things. If they want to have that serious debate and look at the numbers, I can show them. Five-thousand-553 people working within the centres, 414 of them turned over within a year. None of them can boast that record, not a community-based, none of them.

Gerald Tooth: But what happens when things go wrong in the corporate childcare world.

With ABC Learning Centres now owning 750 centres, what would be the impact on children if such a large player found itself in financial difficulty?

The recent history of Child Care Centres Australia provides a salutary insight. Caroline Fewster is an Associate Professor in Early Childhood at Bond University on the Gold Coast. She was also a board member of Child Care Centres Australia, a board that was chaired by Liberal party figure, Andrew Peacock.

CCCA was heading down a similar path to ABC Learning Centres. It had floated on the stockmarket with the help of Andrew Peacock’s son-in-law and prominent Liberal, Michael Kroger. The company was rapidly expanding when it acquired 41 centres in Western Australia.

The company hadn’t done its sums properly though, overestimating its profits by almost 90%. The whole thing went belly-up and shares were suspended from trading.

Former Child Care Centres Australia board member Caroline Fewster says that had a devastating effect within the centres at ground level.

Caroline Fewster: Very worrying effect on staff, children and families, and particularly directors. This impacts on the quality of child care provision, and I saw it first-hand. There were many dilemmas that we all faced in that rather sad time for the company and all of those involved.

Gerald Tooth: What about the children, what happens for the children or to the children in that circumstance when a large child care company is in financial difficulty?

Caroline Fewster: Well there are many effects on the provision of service to children and families. One is that there may be a change of staff, so you get an upheaval of staff changes.

Gerald Tooth: And I presume those working that stayed would have been stressed. Does that stress get passed on to the children?

Caroline Fewster: Definitely, because the staff, particularly the director, has to fulfil different roles, and they have to adapt to a new way of doing things, a new administrative system. This has a very negative impact on everybody concerned.

Gerald Tooth: Caroline Fewster says that even before the company found itself in financial trouble, she often found sitting on the board of a corporate childcare centre a very uncomfortable place to be.

Caroline Fewster: I’ve definitely experienced many tensions, and many ethical dilemmas in my time and it’s a really difficult situation, is my experience.

Gerald Tooth: What were some of those ethical dilemmas?
"The hardest part was to constantly be reviewing...the cost of the wages per week, constantly reviewing for profit, not for the service provision."

Caroline Fewster: I found the hardest part was to constantly be reviewing the status of the children’s services workforce within each child care centre. Constantly reviewing on how because of the cost of the wages per week, constantly reviewing for profit, not for the service provision. I found those to be decisions that I found most difficult to work with.

Gerald Tooth: So your experience of the corporate sector was that they were making decisions on staffing about profits, not about what services were being provided to children?

Caroline Fewster: Yes. In many cases it was a financial decision rather than the program which needed so badly to have extra hours for staff. I also found that to be – it was unsettling staff because they couldn’t predict the hours of work that they were going to have. Therefore they can’t borrow money to buy a house or to buy a car, those dilemmas gave me sleepless nights.

Gerald Tooth: Caroline Fewster, former board member of Child Care Centres Australia. The company was eventually bailed out by Peppercorn Management. Both companies are now merging with ABC Learning Centres.

Caroline Fewster’s story also highlights the fact that there is virtually no regulation on who can own and run a childcare company. For example, Andrew Peacock had no experience in the field when he came to the chairmanship of CCCA. And in the rush to get in on a good thing, new entrants such as a diamond mining company are now taking their chances in the industry.

Meanwhile, at the head of the pack, ABC Learning Centres is developing the complete vertically integrated company structure. It’s now started trainings its own staff in early childhood education.

So much rests on the quality of training for those that work in childcare centres. Research conducted in the UK, the US and in New Zealand has produced results showing strong links between the quality of the early childhood educator and positive outcomes for children.

Yet our children are getting anything but consistency.

As we said earlier, different states require different levels of training to become a group leader in a centre. And there’s even a loophole about meeting those standards.

If a childcare centre operator has advertised for trained staff and not got them, they can install an unqualified person as a group leader. The proviso is that that person must be enrolled in a course to get their qualifications. The end result for children though is that a lowly-paid 17-year-old without proper training can be put in charge of delivering programs that they know little about.

Eddy Groves says this is not an uncommon scenario within the industry and it does happen at ABC Learning Centres.

Eddy Groves: For sure, yes, and so do all the community-based, too. That just comes from the growth in childcare. And that the universities and training colleges hasn’t kept up. And that’s exactly the reason why that provision was put into the legislation, because if they didn’t put that provision in the legislation, what you’d have is you’d have a situation where you couldn’t get group leaders with the qualification and childcare in Australia would come to a halt.

Gerald Tooth: So how do you maintain a quality service if your group leaders don’t have that full qualification that they’re supposed to have?

Eddy Groves: Well it’s about the ongoing training and it’s also about the training within the particular sector. I mean that’s not just an ABC scenario, that’s an industry scenario, and you could look at any community-based operation and find exactly the same thing.

Gerald Tooth: Alison Elliott from ACER says it’s time we had national standards outlining just what qualifications early childhood educations should hold.

Alison Elliott: Our standard for children aged five and over is four-year degree, but we’re not at all sure what we should have with children five years and under who are in the pre-school sector, and the child care sector. "We’ve got no national agreement on what is appropriate, and yet these are the staff who are responsible for development in education and care of children at their most vulnerable." We’ve got no national agreement on what is appropriate, and yet these are the staff who are responsible for development in education and care of children at their most vulnerable period, and what we know from the research is that there’s particular and rapid brain growth in those early years, and particular receptiveness in children to learning opportunities. And unless we can be in there enriching those opportunities, we’re likely to suffer the consequences down the track. And there’s good evidence for that throughout the world.

Gerald Tooth: Dr Alison Elliott of the Australian Council for Educational Research.

The President of Early Childhood Australia, Judy Radich, says she feels for parents coming into childcare not knowing what they should expect of the service they’ve chosen.

Judy Radich: They often need to put their children in child care for various reasons and they want to believe it’s going to be good for their children, so if they get a bright, breezy welcome at the front door, and the child’s happy most of the time, they believe it’s all right. But it’s the very first educational-type setting, or away from home setting that parents often put their children into, and they don’t know to ask the right questions.

Gerald Tooth: With the help of some childcare experts, Background Briefing has compiled a list of the right questions for you to ask at your childcare centre. Some of the most important are:

What is the accreditation history of the centre? Did it receive a ‘high quality’ or ‘satisfactory quality’ rating last time it was assessed?

Does this centre have an open door policy and are parents encouraged to drop in at any time?

How many children are in the room at any given time? What are the current staff-child ratios?

What are the qualifications of the group leader in my child’s room?

For a full list of questions, please visit the Background Briefing website.

Gerald Tooth: Background Briefing’s Co-ordinating Producer is Linda McGinnis. Research and Web, Elissar Mukhtar; Technical Production, Mark Don; Executive Producer, Kirsten Garrett. I’m Gerald Tooth and you’re listening to ABC Radio National.


Questions to ask your child-care centre
	

Source: [[ABC Radio National - Background Briefing: 3 October  2004  - Child-Care Profits|http://www.abc.net.au/rn/talks/bbing/stories/s1214400.htm]]
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After the Bear Stearns bailout: Fears of more Wall Street failures
By Barry Grey
17 March 2008

Use this version to print | Send this link by email | Email the author

In the aftermath of Friday’s emergency action by the Federal Reserve Board to prevent the immediate collapse of the Wall Street investment bank Bear Stearns, US and global markets are bracing for signs that other major US financial institutions will similarly implode.

In a move than has no precedent since the Great Depression of the 1930s, the US central bank brokered an arrangement whereby JP Morgan Chase borrows money from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and makes it available to Bear Stearns, in the form of a 28-day loan. The Fed explicitly stipulated that it, not JP Morgan Chase, would assume the risk of a default on the loan by Bear Stearns.

The Fed acknowledged that it took this extraordinary action to prevent a run on Bear Stearns, the fifth largest investment bank in the US, from causing an immediate failure of the institution. Noting the danger of “systemic” consequences of such a development, the Fed in effect signaled that it feared a collapse of Bear Stearns would lead to a panic on financial markets and collapse of confidence in the US banking system.

In an article published on Saturday, headlined, “Debt Reckoning: US Receives a Margin Call,” the Wall Street Journal summed up the significance of Friday’s events as follows:

“The US is at the receiving end of a massive margin call: Across the economy, wary lenders are demanding that borrowers put up more collateral or sell assets to reduce debts.

“The unfolding financial crisis—one that began with bad bets on securities backed by subprime mortgages, then sparked a tightening of credit between big banks—appears to be broadening further. For years, the US economy has been borrowing from cash-rich lenders from Asia to the Middle East. American firms and households have enjoyed readily available credit at easy terms. No longer.

“Recent days’ cascade of bad news, culminating in yesterday’s bailout of Bear Stearns, is accelerating the erosion of trust in the longevity of some brand-name US financial institutions. The growing crisis of confidence now extends to the credit-worthiness of borrowers across the spectrum—touching American homeowners, who are seeing the value of their bedrock asset decline, and raising questions about the capacity of the Federal Reserve and US government to rapidly repair the problems.”

In its lead editorial, the Financial Times of London sounded a similarly ominous note, writing:

“Bear Stearns is a leverage machine: with only $11.8 billion of capital from its shareholders it supports a balance sheet of $395 billion, most of it in bonds, and many of those backed by mortgages. To finance that balance sheet, Bear relies on short-term loans secured against its portfolio of bonds...

“A poisonous cycle has taken hold. As mortgage-backed bonds fall in value—even those backed by quasi-government entities Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac—banks demand more security to lend against them. That pushes leveraged investors to sell bonds, depressing prices still further, prompting more margin calls and the collapse of some funds, such as Peloton Capital and Carlyle Capital Corporation...

“There is a whiff of 1929 about all this... Now the question is: what else is out there? Will the liquidity and solvency of other large banks and brokers be called into question?”

The New York Times on Saturday quoted James L. Melcher, president of Balestra Capital, a hedge fund based in New York, as saying, “You get to where people can’t trade with each other. If the Fed hadn’t acted this morning and Bear did default on its obligations, then that could have triggered a very widespread panic and potentially a collapse of the financial system.”

The Fed’s action was aimed at buying time for an orderly disposition of the Bear Stearns debacle, most likely involving the sale of the 85-year-old company, either in whole or in parts, to other banks or financial institutions. Talks were launched on Friday to find one or more buyers of the firm, with speculation centering first on JP Morgan Chase, the clearing bank for Bear Stearns. Other possible takers mentioned in press accounts include the Royal Bank of Scotland and J. C. Flowers, a private equity firm.

Even as these talks were underway, doubts were being raised about another Wall Street titan, the investment bank Lehman Brothers. Bear Stearns was particularly vulnerable to the pressure of a growing credit crisis, combined with a slide into recession, mounting inflation and a rapid fall in the US dollar, in part because it was the second biggest underwriter of mortgage-backed securities. Lehman, however, is the largest underwriter of these distressed and largely unmarketable investments.

While Lehman’s capital position is reportedly stronger than Bear Stearns’, it is the weakest of the other major Wall Street investment houses and commercial banks. The price of Bear Stearns’ stock plummeted by 47 percent on Friday, but Lehman Brothers’ stock also took a gigantic hit, losing 15 percent.

In an unambiguous sign of investor nervousness over Lehman’s prospects, the price for insuring the firm’s debt jumped to $478 per $10,000 in bonds on Friday, from $385 in the morning, according to Thomson Financial.

Another indication of problems was Lehman’s announcement Friday that it had obtained a $2 billion, three-year line of unsecured bank credit from a consortium of 40 banks. JP Morgan Chase and Citigroup led the effort to shore up Lehman’s balance sheet.

The near-panic mood in US and global markets is not likely to improve this week, as four of the five biggest Wall Street investment banks report their fourth quarter earnings. Bear Stearns was due to report on Thursday, but moved the timing up to Monday after Friday’s developments. The others due to report are Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and Lehman Brothers. It is widely expected that the firms will report billions more in write-downs and losses from failing mortgage-backed securities and other distressed debt holdings.

On March 7, Goldman Sachs upped its projection of total bank losses likely to be suffered as a result of the credit crisis to $1,156 trillion—$500 billion in mortgage-backed securities and $656 billion in other soured investments.

The Fed’s action in throwing a temporary life-line to Bear Stearns was the latest in a series of increasingly desperate measures taken by the central bank to avert a financial meltdown. Already this month, the Fed has allocated an additional $400 billion in credit to major banks and investment houses, agreeing to accept as collateral for Treasury bonds privately issued mortgage-backed securities.

On Tuesday, the Federal Reserve’s Federal Open Market Committee meets and is expected to announce a further cut in short-term interest rates of at least 0.5 percent. Market players are betting heavily that the Fed will go even further and slash rates by 0.75 percent or even a full 1 percent. This will bring the federal funds rate, the rate banks charge one another for overnight loans, to 2.5 percent or less. It will mean a cumulative cut of at least 2.75 percent since the Fed began slashing interest rates last September in response to the credit crunch brought on by the collapse of the housing market and soaring home loan defaults and foreclosures.

The massive injections of liquidity and rapid reduction in interest rates can only accelerate the rise in commodity prices, stoking inflationary pressures, and further undermine the dollar on world currency markets. On Friday, Gold reached new records, surpassing the $1,000-per ounce mark and crude oil hit new highs. The dollar reached a twelve-year low against the Japanese yen, hit record lows against the euro, and for the first time ever fell below parity with the Swiss franc.

These are devastating expressions of the decline of confidence worldwide in the US financial system. “Gold is not only an inflation hedge,” said James Turk, founder of GoldMoney.com, “it’s a catastrophe hedge.” He added, “Gold is becoming increasingly important as the credit crunch continues to spiral out of control.”

US Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson’s appearances on Sunday talk shows could not have improved the view of investors on the prospects for the US and global economy. Asked point blank by moderator Chris Wallace of Fox News and George Stephanopoulos of ABC News whether there were other major banks or finance houses likely to suffer a fate similar to that of Bear Stearns, Paulson evaded the question, but pointedly did not rule it out. When asked whether the Bush administration would take stronger measures to bolster the dollar, he similarly demurred, merely repeating the official mantra that “a strong dollar is in the national interest of the United States.”

Notwithstanding the assurances by the Bush administration that the present crisis is little more than a “rough patch,” the signs of impending disaster are mounting. As the Wall Street Journal reported Saturday, there are indications that the massive flow of capital into the US that has sustained the increasingly indebted American economy is markedly slowing. The Journal noted:

“While cash continues to pour into the US from abroad, this flow has been slowing. In 2007, foreigners’ net acquisition of long-term bonds and stocks in the US was $596 billion, down from $722 billion in 2006, according to Treasury Department data. From July to December, as jitters about securities linked to US subprime mortgages spread, net purchases were just $121 billion, a 65 percent decrease from the same period a year earlier. Americans, meanwhile, are investing more of their own money abroad.”

Agence France-Presse carried a story Saturday on one indication of the historical decline in the global position of American capitalism that is at the heart of the current crisis. Under the headline “Dollar’s Plunge Pushes Eurozone Past US,” the news agency cited a report issued last week by Goldman Sachs noting: “With the euro now trading around 1.56 against the dollar, the size of its annual output (at market value) has exceeded that of the United States.”

See Also:
Fed rescue of Bear Stearns raises specter of Depression-era crash
[15 March 2008]
Gold and oil prices soar, dollar slumps, Carlyle Group fund collapses
[14 March 2008]
US Federal Reserve injects $200 billion into credit markets to avert financial meltdown
[13 March 2008]

Source: [[After the Bear Stearns bailout: Fears of more Wall Street failures|http://www.wsws.org/articles/2008/mar2008/bear-m17.shtml]]
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Answers sought from ABC's nowhere man

Date: February 28 2008

Mark Hawthorne

HE WAS once known as the "other Eddy Everywhere", but ABC Learning Centres boss Edmund Groves is proving a rather difficult man to track down at the moment.

Certainly he's more difficult to find than the original "Eddie Everywhere", Melbourne's Eddie McGuire.

It's little wonder, really.

After amassing a $270 million personal fortune by the age of 40, Eddy Groves lost $45 million in just two hours on Tuesday morning.

There are plenty of corporate heavyweights, including a bank with heavy exposure to ABC and a rather powerful Singapore family, who are looking for Eddy at the moment.

National Australia Bank, Lazard Asset Management and Challenger Financial Services top the list.

Indeed, Lazard added 4.9 million ABC Learning shares to its portfolio in January and February this year, to become the major shareholder in the company, and announced the purchases just days before ABC's share price collapse.

No doubt there's a few suits at Lazard HQ in Sydney who would like a chat.

Sadly for them, Eddy can be a hard man to track down. His preferred mode of transport is a private Citation CJ3 jet, which means he can whip in and out of Australia's airports at will.

It's the very same model that famous flying Australian Dick Smith likes to get about in and, in case you were wondering, they cost about $US7 million ($A7.45 million). Which isn't quite as much as Eddy and his co-directors have blown in margin calls this week.

That private jet has been parked out at Melbourne Airport for much of the week, as Eddy has worked hard to appease investors and hold the crumbling child-care empire together.

After conducting a telephone briefing with media in Melbourne on Tuesday, at which he refused to answer questions about personal margin calls and denied the child-care empire was up for sale, Eddy visited Macquarie Group's Melbourne HQ yesterday, according to insiders.

"He's booked solid," one source revealed to Full Disclosure.

Sadly, Eddy had to skip his most high-profile appearance - he was due to visit the Melbourne Tigers versus Brisbane Bullets semi-final at the State Netball and Hockey Centre last night.

Instead, the ABC Learning Centres founder Edmund Groves was ensconced in crisis meetings rather than supporting the Bullets in their semi-final, the National Basketball League club that he owns.

Pity - Eddy needs a few pointers in rebounding at the moment, after ABC Learning plunged 40%, with a bullet, on Monday.

Indeed, while the Bullets battled the Tigers, there was plenty to keep Eddy, his wife, Le Neve Groves, and fellow directors David Ryan and Martin Kemp busy.

All have been forced to dump millions of dollars worth of shares in the company, and now the ASX has confirmed it is investigating trading in the company's shares and disclosures by the board.

In four announcements made to the stock exchange, the founder and CEO revealed he had dumped more than 8 million shares worth $14.8 million, at an average price of $1.84, leaving him with 12 million shares.

Maybe Eddy will have to downgrade that jet at some stage. After all, both chicken boss Bob Ingham and former motorcycle champ Mick Doohan are content with the smaller Citation V11. They cost a mere $5 million.

Well connectedWHILE Eddy Groves works hard to appease disgruntled investors, a chill wind has blown through the Opposition benches in Canberra after ABC Learning's share price collapse.

Federal government child-care subsidies have provided the foundations on which ABC Learning was built.

Indeed, Federal Government subsidies contributed about 45% to ABC Learning's Australian revenue last financial year.

One of the planks of John Howard's election pitch was the Liberal Party's $687 million child-care plan.

If it won the election, the Coalition planned to pay the child-care rebate directly to operators, instead of directly to parents, from April 1. Directly to operators such as ABC Learning, which dominates the market.

The company's share price soared on that news - up from $5.52 before the announcement to a high $6.28, before settling back to close at $5.99.

Of course, as Full Disclosure has reported before, Liberal Party links with ABC Learning, the world's largest provider of child-care services, are purely coincidental.

Former Howard Government minister Larry Anthony is on the board. Sallyanne Atkinson, the former lord mayor of Brisbane and a Liberal Party member, is chairwoman of ABC Learning.

Anthony is, coincidentally, the former Minister for Children and Youth Affairs. He found a new job as a non-executive director at ABC Learning just four months after losing his seat of Richmond in the 2004 election.

In 2004 ABC also bought out listed rival Child Care Centres Australia, which boasted former Liberal Party leader Andrew Peacock as its chairman. J.T. Campbell, the investment bank of Liberal Party powerbroker Michael Kroger, had been a shareholder and adviser to the company.

This material is subject to copyright and any unauthorised use, copying or mirroring is prohibited.

[ The Age | Text-only index]   


Source: [[Answers sought from ABC's nowhere man|http://business.theage.com.au/answers-sought-from-abcs-nowhere-man/20080227-1vb3.html?skin=text-only]]
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<font size="+2"><b>Fixed Gear Conversions</b></font></a></td><td align="right"><a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed-conversion.html"><b>Building up a fixed-gear bike</b></a></td></tr></tbody></table>
<blockquote>This article deals with the nuts-and-bolts of converting a conventional bicycle into a fixed gear.<p>
</p></blockquote>

<center><img alt="Spoke Divider" src="http://sheldonbrown.com/images/spokeflop.gif" height="12" width="559"></center>

<table width="100%">
<tbody><tr><td>
<a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/fix_test.html">
<font size="+2"><b>Fixed Gear Testimonials</b></font></a></td><td align="right"><a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/fix_test.html"><b>For the unsure.</b></a></td></tr></tbody></table>
<blockquote>A collection of testimonials from happy fixed-gear converts.<p>
</p></blockquote>
<center><img alt="Spoke Divider" src="http://sheldonbrown.com/images/spoke.gif" height="12" width="559"></center>

<table width="100%">
<tbody><tr><td bgcolor="#faffca">
<a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed-scb.html">
<font size="+2"><b>My Fixed-Gear Fleet</b></font></a></td><td align="right"><a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed-scb.html"><b>Think you have too many bikes?</b></a></td></tr></tbody></table>
<blockquote>Read about my personal collection of weird and wonderful fixed-gear bikes.<p>
</p></blockquote>

<center><img alt="Spoke Divider" src="http://sheldonbrown.com/images/spokeflop.gif" height="12" width="559"></center>

 
<table width="100%"><tbody><tr><td>
<font size="+2"><b><a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/deakins/how-to-fixed-conversion.html">Fixed-gear on the Cheap!  by Tom Deakins  </a></b></font>
</td><td align="right">
<b>Not sure you'll like fixed gear?  Handy?</b>
</td></tr></tbody></table>
<blockquote>
Convert an old clunker to taste the fixed-gear experience. 
</blockquote>
<p>
 
<table width="100%"><tbody><tr><td>
<font size="+2"><b><font color="RED">NEW!</font> <a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed-knees.html">Fixed-gears and Knee Health  by Charles Renner </a></b></font>
</td><td align="right">
<b>Is fixed gear riding beneficial for cyclists who suffer knee problems?</b>
</td></tr></tbody></table>
</p><blockquote>
It's an interesting theory, but by no means proven one way or another.
</blockquote>
<p>



<table width="100%">
<tbody><tr><td>
<a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/singlecross.html">
<font size="+2"><b>Singlespeed Cyclocross</b></font></a></td><td align="right"><a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/singlecross.html"><b>by Tarik Saleh</b></a></td></tr></tbody></table>
</p><blockquote>Does a singlespeed give you an unfair advantage in cyclocross racing?
</blockquote>

<center><img alt="Spoke Divider" src="http://sheldonbrown.com/images/spokeflop.gif" height="12" width="559"></center>

<table width="100%">
<tbody><tr><td>
<a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/singlespeed.html">
<font size="+2"><b> Singlespeed Mountain Bikes</b></font></a></td><td align="right"><a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/singlespeed.html"><b>One is enough!</b></a></td></tr></tbody></table>
<blockquote>Many cyclists are rebelling against the excessive
complication, fragility and weight of current mountain bikes. More and
more cyclists are discovering the joys of simple, one-speed bicycles.
</blockquote>

<center><img alt="Spoke Divider" src="http://sheldonbrown.com/images/spokeflop.gif" height="12" width="559"></center>

<table width="100%">
<tbody><tr><td bgcolor="#ffffff">
<a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/fixed.html">
<font size="+2"><b>Harris Cyclery Fixed-Gear Parts</b></font></a></td><td align="right"><a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/fixed.html"><b>Hard to find fixed-gear parts</b></a></td></tr></tbody></table>
<blockquote>If your local bike shop doesn't carry fixed gear stuff, you can get it here!<p>
</p></blockquote>

<center><img alt="Spoke Divider" src="http://sheldonbrown.com/images/spoke.gif" height="12" width="559"></center>
<table width="100%">
<tbody><tr><td>
<a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/awfixed.html">
<font size="+2"><b>Make your own 2-speed fixed-gear</b></font></a></td><td align="right"><b>A <i>very advanced</i> do-it-yourself project.</b></td></tr></tbody></table>
<blockquote>It is theoretically possible to convert a Sturmey-Archer AW three-speed hub into a two-speed fixed gear.
</blockquote>
<center><img alt="Spoke Divider" src="http://sheldonbrown.com/images/spoke.gif" height="12" width="559"></center>
<table width="100%">
<tbody><tr><td>
<a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/gears/">
<font size="+2"><b> Online Gear Calculator</b></font></a></td><td align="right"><a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/gears/"><b>For cyclists who are not mathphobes.</b></a></td></tr></tbody></table>

<blockquote>
You can calculate <a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/gain.html">gain ratios</a>, <a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_g.html#gearinch">gear inches</a>, or <a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_da-o.html#development">meters development.</a> with my<big> <b><a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/gears/">Online Gear Calculator</a></b></big> 
</blockquote>
<center><img alt="Spoke Divider" src="http://sheldonbrown.com/images/spokeflop.gif" height="12" width="559"></center>

<table width="100%">
<tbody><tr><td>
<a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/gain.html"><font size="+2"><b>Gain Ratios</b></font></a></td><td align="right"><a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/gain.html"><b>For gear-head techno-nerds only! </b></a></td></tr></tbody></table>

<blockquote>A new and different way to calculate your bicycle's gears, and to compare the gears of one bicycle with those of another.<p>
 </p></blockquote>

<center><img alt="Spoke Divider" src="http://sheldonbrown.com/images/spoke.gif" height="12" width="559"></center>

<table width="100%">
<tbody><tr><td>
<a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/glossary.html">
<font size="+2"><b>Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Glossary</b></font></a></td><td align="right"><a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/glossary.html"><b>For all cyclists.</b></a></td></tr></tbody></table>

<blockquote>An encyclopedic listing of bicycle lore, technical data and opinions.<p>
 </p></blockquote>
 
<table width="100%">
<tbody><tr><td>
<a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/pbp2007/index.html">
<font size="+2"><b>Paris Brest Paris on Fixed Gear</b></font></a></td><td align="right"><a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/glossary.html"><b>by Emily O'Brien</b></a></td></tr></tbody></table>

<blockquote>An inspiring report on an epic ride, the 2007 Paris Brest Paris<p>
 </p></blockquote>

<h2>External Fixed-Gear Links:</h2>



<h2><a href="http://software.bareknucklebrigade.com/">Rabbit, A Singlespeed and Fixed-gear Calculator</a>
</h2>
<blockquote>
Tom Kunicki's specialized calculator for fixed-gear and singlespeed applications
</blockquote>


<h2><a href="http://www.63xc.com" target="_blank">63xc.com-Fixed-gear Offroad!</a>
</h2>
<blockquote>
Into the woods without a freewheel!
</blockquote>


<h2><a href="http://c8m47.pi.tu-berlin.de/tandem/fixedgear_e.html" target="_blank">Dirk Bettge's converted Hercules 3-speed</a>
</h2>
<blockquote>
You don't need a fancy frame to get started in fixed gear!
</blockquote>
<h2><a href="http://www.63xc.com/gregg/101_1.htm" target="_blank">Fixed-Gear 101</a>
</h2>
<blockquote>
Greg Goode's introduction to fixed gear technique

</blockquote> 





<h2><a href="http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/" target="_blank">Fixed-Gear Gallery</a>
</h2>
<blockquote>
Zillions of fixed gear bike pix.</blockquote> 



<h2><a href="http://www.fyxomatosis.com/" target="_blank">Fixymatosis</a>
</h2>
<blockquote>
Pretty pictures from Oz</blockquote> 





<h2><a href="http://www.oldskooltrack.com/" target="olds">OldSkoolTrack.com</a></h2>
<blockquote>
Good site for the urban fixed gear fan, but they're wrong about the need for brakes.
</blockquote>
 
 

<h2><a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/contact.html#feedback">Feedback?</a> <a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/contact.html">Questions?</a></h2>

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<<tagCloud>>
GLW Year 2006


Dick Nichols

The Australian economy has entered its 15th straight year of growth — its longest ever. It sailed through the 1997-98 Asian economic crisis and the 2001 global recession and now, with China sucking in enormous volumes of high-priced Australian iron ore, coal and gas, there's no sign of an end to the bonanza.

In 2005, the explosion in raw materials prices boosted Australia's terms of trade (prices of exports compared to prices of imports) by 13%, to a level not seen since the 1950s Korean War-driven wool boom.

Growth among Australia's other main trading partners is adding shine to the picture. In April, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) increased its forecast for world growth by 0.6 percentage points to 4.9%, the highest for 30 years. Financial markets, as tracked by the IMF's Global Financial Stability Report, show “unusually low risk premia and volatility”.

The “average Australian” has certainly got wealthier since the last recession (1990-91). Real per capita income has grown by 40% and the net financial wealth of a working-age Australian has doubled in real terms.

Of course, this growing pie has been divvied up very unevenly, with Australia's top 200 corporations and their CEOs getting a whopping slice, the top 10-15% of wage and salary earners a decent chunk and the working majority some crumbs (usually just before PM John Howard faces an election).

And the price of this “Australian economic miracle”? People working harder, longer and under greater stress; ongoing pillage of the natural environment; a collapse in infrastructure spending and very little reduction in the numbers living below the poverty line.

But how shock-proof have 25 years of economic rationalist “reforms” made this grotesquely unjust model? Is the 15-year boom more the result of such policies or of good luck?
Profit bonanza

The economy's basic motor remains the strength of business investment, which has lifted total investment (including that in housing and by government) above its historic average of 24.5% of GDP. Since mid-2002 business investment has grown at an annual rate of 14%, replacing household consumption as the main driver of growth.

Short of a crisis elsewhere in the world economy, it is hard to see this investment cycle turning down soon. How could the “investment climate” for the boardrooms be better than the present combination of high profitability, rising share prices, oceans of retained earnings and low real interest rates?

Despite some recent nervous “corrections” provoked by fears of a crash in intensely speculative world commodities markets, the Australian share market is at a record level. And unlike the years before the 1987 share market crash, this increase so far corresponds to a real lift in profits — up 24% over the year to December 2005.

At the same time that other den of speculation, the housing market, has been temporarily brought in to the “soft landing” planned for it in 2003 by the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA).

The rise in world oil prices is yet to spur the sort of inflation that would force sharp increases in interest rates — the RBA's recent 0.25 percentage point rise was a touch on the brakes done in the hope of avoiding a bigger rate hike later on. And while wage growth in 2005 averaged 4.2% and there are labour shortages across an increasing spread of skills and professions, business surveys still show expected inflation holding at just under 3% (the top of the RBA's target range).

Overseas corporations and financial institutions continue to show great belief in Australia as a profit opportunity. The current account deficit (CAD) — the difference between revenue from exports and Australian investments abroad as against spending on imports and revenue repatriated to foreigners investing in Australia — reached a record 7.2% of GDP in the December quarter of 2004.

Nonetheless, since mid-2004 the Australian dollar has slightly appreciated against the US dollar, the euro and the yen.

The real interest differential between Australian and US bonds — the risk premium demanded by overseas investors for lending to Australian governments and corporations — now hovers around zero (after being as high as 4% in 1993).

This confidence has largely been won through the continuing successes of Australian governments, Liberal and Labor, in implementing the capital-friendly recipes of economic rationalism.

Inflation? It was smashed by Paul Keating's 1990-91 “recession we had to have” and kept low ever since by RBA determination not to let it escape the 2-3% target range (and ACTU acceptance of this).

The federal budget deficit? This has been put into surplus such that federal government debt (still $96 billion in 1996) could be paid off.

Productivity? Its annual average growth rate reached 3.2% in the upturn after the 1990-91 recession (1% more than the historical trend), due overwhelmingly to Labor's introduction of enterprise bargaining and Howard's 1996 Workplace Relations Act.

Australia's secular terms of trade decline? Overturned, but here Canberra can claim only a part of the credit. Though partly due to increased exports of manufactures and services, this trend reversal has mainly been driven by the huge fall in the prices of imported manufactures from Asia, especially China.
CAD vulnerability?

What about Australia's chronic CAD and foreign debt burden, which caused so much angst in the 1980s, and which continues to average 4.5% of GDP, $56 billion for 2006? In the early 1990s economic commentators of all stripes (including this one) believed that the CAD set a “speed limit” for the Australian economy.

The conviction was that a growth rate much over 3.5% would suck in imports at such a pace that the CAD would rapidly widen and interest rates would have to rise to attract capital inflows. That would increase the risk of a downturn in investment and even recession. But growth averaging 3.9% in the 1990s disproved this theorem.

The key point to grasp here is that the CAD of any national economy also measures the degree to which domestic investors (corporate, government and household) draw on foreign savings to fund that part of their investment that is not funded by domestic savings.

Australia, like every other “frontier” capitalist economy, has traditionally been inserted into the world economy in this way, permanently drawing on the savings of older capitalist economies to help fund development. That is, in terms of its balance of payments, the Australian economy has nearly always run a surplus on its capital account, the mirror image of its CAD.

There is nothing wrong with running a CAD year after year, provided that foreign investors are happy enough with the deal they're getting and don't see any threats that would make them “head for the exits” — like a drastic Australian dollar depreciation devaluing their investments in terms of other currencies. And the greater their confidence, the lower will be the real interest rate needed to lure them into holding Australian debt, the more they'll invest in exploiting Australian labour, and the easier monetary policy, and the faster growth, can be.

This is what happened in the 1990s. Once the “investment community” became convinced that the RBA would lock in low inflation and the Howard government budget surpluses, the rate of investment in Australian assets accelerated and risk premia on Australian debt quickly shrank. As a result, net foreign private debt as a proportion of GDP has nearly doubled since 1995, from 26% to 48%.

Not that Australia’s policymakers have become blase about the CAD and Australia's foreign liabilities — that's a big ongoing discussion. Rather, they have attacked the gap between investment and savings that it expresses directly by introducing forced savings (superannuation) schemes and the Future Fund, and by running government budget surpluses and paying off the government part of foreign debt. That this hasn't automatically reduced the CAD is due to the fact that any government penny-pinching can always be offset by increases in private investment and/or falls in private saving.

Nonetheless, the experience of the five “Anglo-Saxon” economies over this period — Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Britain and the US, all of which have experienced a big housing boom — shows that it has only been in those that have eliminated government budget deficits that the overall savings rate has been maintained (Australia, New Zealand) or increased (Canada) — even as the overall rate of investment has risen.

This result confirms research which has found that every dollar added to government budget surpluses increases total savings on average by 50 cents (see IMF World Economic Outlook, September 2005).
Brilliant or lucky?

Australia’s economic policymakers would have us believe that the economic rationalist crusade is the main reason for Australia's 15-year growth phase. There is only a little truth to that claim — most developed capitalist countries enjoyed low inflation growth in the 1990s. And Australia has been ideally placed to feed off the ongoing Chinese boom, which would have sustained growth in almost any policy environment.

Australia's success in navigating the 1997-98 Asian econo0mic crisis was as much due to the extra influx of overseas funds seeking a “safe haven” than the cleverly depreciated Australian dollar. Or rather, this influx of capital fleeing the Asian mess freed the RBA to allow the cash rate to fall to 4.75% without having to worry about the impact on the CAD.

The RBA's acceptance of the depreciation of the Australian dollar by almost a quarter allowed boosted internal demand to sustain growth, despite the shrinkage of important Asian export markets.

By contrast New Zealand policymakers initially tried to defend their dollar by raising interest rates, producing a recession in 1998.

A similar tactic allowed the Australian economy to weather the 2000-01 global downturn, during which the RBA cut the cash rate from 6% to 4.25%. Then, when the speculative bubble in housing looked like getting out of control in 2002-03, rates were raised.

So, by reducing the need to worry about the CAD, the “reforms” have helped sustain the boom. But the Australian CAD, while not imposing any speed limit in the simple sense, still remains a critical point of vulnerability. Preventing foreign capital from exiting the economy means not upsetting corporate confidence — all policy must be directed to that end.

But is it all enough to guarantee that Australia will ride out the next financial tsunami or global recession as buoyantly as in 1997 and 2001?

[Dick Nichols is the managing editor of Seeing Red. For sources used in this article email <dicknichols@greenleft.org.au>.]

From Green Left Weekly, June 14, 2006.
Visit the Green Left Weekly home page.


Source: [[Green Left - Issues: Australia in the world economy: shock-proof or just plain lucky?|http://www.greenleft.org.au/2006/671/6465]]
17 November 1993

Dick Nichols

The first article in this series, printed in GLW #671, looked at how much the bipartisan recipe of neoliberal “economic rationalism” has been responsible for Australia's 15 years of economic growth, noting its successes in making the country an attractive “investment opportunity” for overseas capital and so allowing its economy to grow faster.

How vulnerable though is the “flexible and competitive” Australian economy to any explosion of the tensions building up in the world capitalist economy? These “global imbalances” are most obviously reflected in the headlong growth of the indebtedness of the US — the world's largest national economy, which is also the world’s largest debtor nation.

What created the huge US external debt is examined in this article. Further articles in this series will assess the debate over how dangerous a threat it poses and how the fallout from a severe increase in the US current account deficit (CAD) might affect the world economy and Australia within it.

In the last quarter of 2005 — for only the sixth time since 1960 — US investments abroad delivered less income to their owners than did the assets of foreign investors in the US. For the whole year, this “net income balance” was in the black by only US$1.6 billion, a fall from $30.4 billion in 2004 and not a good profit result for the world's preeminent imperialist power.

The net income balance forms part of the current account side of the overall balance of payments, whose main component is the balance on trade in goods and services. Here the US has continued to rack up enormous deficits — $723.6 billion in 2005. With other payments abroad added in, such as grants to client states like Israel and for occupied Iraq's “reconstruction”, the total US CAD reached a record $804.9 billion last year — 6.4% of US gross domestic product and more than Australia's GDP.

Like any excess of national spending over national income, this CAD had to be funded, either by borrowing abroad and/or by running down official reserves of foreign exchange and gold.

In 2005, net capital inflows into the US were $801 billion ($1.293 trillion in gross foreign inflows into the US minus $492 billion in gross US investment abroad).
Foreign capital inflows

Up until the 2001 recession, private capital looking for gain in the US “new economy” boom prevailed within this inflow. Since then an increasingly important component has been the purchase by Asian central banks, particularly those of China and Japan, of US public and commercial debt to limit their countries' exchange rates from appreciating against the US dollar. This component has risen to over 40% of total inflows, $718 billion between 2002 and 2004. Financial Times analyst Martin Wolf has called this “the largest 'foreign aid' program in history”.

In the balance of payments, capital inflows are registered by the capital and financial account. The overall balance of payments is equal to the current account balance plus the capital and financial account balance. It is equal to zero when the demand for and supply of foreign exchange is equated via movements in the exchange rate and/or official foreign exchange reserves.

The torrent of capital inflows to the US has led the dollar to appreciate 33.5% against the currencies of the countries with which the US most trades — its “trade-weighted index” — between the second quarter of 1995 and the first quarter of 2002. It then fell by 11.9% to the end of 2005.

Twenty-five years of CADs have converted the US from a creditor economy, with net foreign assets worth 7.2% of GDP in 1982, to a debtor economy with net foreign liabilities worth 25.1% of GDP in 2005. The US deficit now soaks up 67% of world current account surpluses. Just holding the US CAD at its current level of 6% of GDP would see US net foreign liabilities double to 50% of GDP by 2010.

Calculations of how large the US CAD will be by 2010, if policies and exchange rates remain unchanged, range between 8% and 12% of GDP. While no observer believes that this scenario will ever eventuate, the timing and impact of any eventual CAD “adjustment” is very difficult to predict.

There is no consensus among analysts. Debate about if and when the US CAD will “blow” sounds like nothing so much as seismologists discussing the location, timing and destructive potential of the next earthquake. Through their economic modelling and investigations of past experiences of CAD reversals, economic analysts have come up with a wide set of scenarios and policy recommendations. These range from “leave well alone” to “panic now”. Why?

Partly, this is because of the nature of the balance of payments accounting categories themselves. These register various economic variables — income flows in and out of a national economy, the degree to which it lends savings to, or borrows them from, other economies to fund domestic investment, and the balance between total national income and expenditure. But they say nothing about how these variables interrelate in real economic life, nor about the underlying economic forces moulding them.

Has the increase in the US CAD mainly been driven from outside the US economy by the ever-increasing inflows of foreign surpluses invested in US assets (stressed by Federal Reserve chairperson Ben Bernanke in his theory of a global “savings glut” being responsible for historically low world interest rates)? Or is the root problem the widening gap within the US between the rate of investment and the overall rate of savings, slashed by a combination of President George Bush's tax cuts and the credit splurge brought on in 2001-02 by ultra-low interest rates? Or have these separate forces impacted differently at different times?

There's a rough consensus that the immediate drivers of the US external deficit are an overvalued dollar making US exports uncompetitive and imports cheap and the relatively faster rate of growth (and hence of demand for imports) in the US compared to Europe and Japan. But while US monetary policy has certainly added to the CAD, has it basically been “made in the USA”?
East Asian surpluses

Another major factor has surely been the vast current account surpluses accumulated by east Asian economies with an export-led development strategy. In the case of China, there's the imperative need to maintain rapid economic growth to provide urban jobs for the tens of millions leaving the countryside each year. Critical here has been the rough peg of the yuan to the US dollar: this arrangement guarantees Chinese export competitiveness in US markets and has underpinned China's vast current account surplus (9.8% of GDP in 2004). This has partly been recycled into US government and commercial debt to the extent necessary to maintain the peg.

The upshot of this policy is that more than $2 trillion — half the world's total foreign currency reserves — have accumulated within the east Asian region in just the past four years. In January, China’s central bank reported that China was on track this year to exceed $1 trillion in foreign exchange reserves. This would elevate China to the biggest holder of foreign currency, eclipsing Japan, which has $847 billion. At the end of April, Taiwan was the third largest holder of foreign currency reserves — $275 billion. South Korea, with $217 billion, was eclipsed that month by Russia, whose earnings from huge oil and gas exports pushed its foreign currency reserves to $225 billion.

At the same time, by maintaining a closely managed link to the US dollar the east Asian economies have been creating a de facto monetary zone (the embryo of an “Asian euro”), attracting foreign investment and reducing the pressure on their finance and banking systems.

But more savings than can be used in domestic investment are being generated elsewhere. Oil and gas exporting countries and even most of Latin America have become part of the “surplus club”, with the result that between 1996 and 2004 the aggregate current accounts of all “emerging economies” with a surplus grew by $421 billion. The increase in the US CAD over the same period was $541 billion.

Yet these figures are dwarfed by the corporate surpluses that have accumulated in the imperialist heartlands. In the G7 countries (Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the US) in 2003-04 alone “excess savings” (undistributed profits less spending on capital) reached $1.3 trillion.

Within the US, the CAD would have been even bigger without this boost from the retained earnings of US corporations.

A strong contribution to inflows into the US also continues to come from foreign corporations, which are both pursuing a strategy of expansion through acquiring assets in the US, as well as parking part of their loot in “safe haven” US government debt (preferable to European or Japanese debt because of higher US interest rates).

Debate continues about the relative importance of the various factors driving the US CAD, but it is clearly a joint creation of relatively high rates of saving (i.e., low rates of consumption and investment) in the rest of the world economy, the specific export-driven development strategy of the east Asian economies, as well as of Washington’s decision to fight the 2001 post-bubble downturn with very easy monetary and fiscal policy.

Can this CAD be gradually unwound by a gradual devaluation of the US dollar? Or is the US economy headed towards a CAD crisis, a loss of confidence in the dollar and a savage devaluation with unimaginable impact on the world economy? That debate will be the subject of the next article in this series.

[Dick Nichols is the managing editor of Seeing Red. For sources used in this article email <dicknichols@greenleft.org.au>.]

From Green Left Weekly, June 21 2006.
Visit the Green Left Weekly home page.

Source: [[Green Left - Issues: Australia's economy and the US debt mountain|http://www.greenleft.org.au/2006/672/6434]]
Behemoth poised to tighten nationwide grip

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By Scott Rochfort
March 14, 2006
AdvertisementAdvertisement

ABC LEARNING is to tighten its dominance of the Australian child-care industry today, with the group expected to announce a $75 million-plus takeover of Kids Campus.

The deal could help ABC boost its number of Australian and New Zealand child-care centres to 1000 this year, more than one-quarter of the nation's total.

Speculation of the deal intensified yesterday when trading in ABC and Kids Campus shares was halted pending an announcement by the two companies.

The chief executive of ABC, Eddy Groves, was unavailable to comment on the speculation. If it is right his company could snap up more than 100 child-care centres owned by Kids Campus.

In a recent presentation to sharemarket investors Mr Groves said ABC was on target to increase the number of its centres in Australia and New Zealand from 660 in the middle of last year to 850 by the end of June. The company has more than tripled the number of its centres in three years.

It has snapped up three rival sharemarket-listed child-care operators since late-2003, and in November last year spent $218 million buying the third-largest operator in the US, the Learning Care Group.

The company has also bought a handful of privately owned child-care companies, including the Sydney-based Universal Childcare, for $18 million, in October. The stake of Mr Groves and his wife, Le Neve, in ABC is now valued at $350 million.

The chairman of Kids Campus, John Murphy, declined to confirm speculation his company was in talks with ABC.

The Association of Community Based Children's Services has raised alarm over the potential deal.

The association's chairwoman, Lynne Wannan, said it would result in more child-care operators having a stronger motive to make profits and please shareholders, rather than provide quality child care.

"It is very difficult to have commercial enterprises like that in the community sector because the drivers are all wrong."

Source: [[Behemoth poised to tighten nationwide grip - National - smh.com.au|http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/behemoth-poised-to-tighten-nationwide-grip/2006/03/13/1142098404572.html]]
Behind the petrol price jump

1 December 2004

Eva Cheng

World crude oil prices have shot up by 70% in the last year, with little sign of them coming down substantially soon. In Australia, petrol prices seem to have settled above $1 per litre, a level hard to believe even just a year ago.

If oil prices don’t fall markedly, the hesitant world economic recovery will be undermined, consumer prices and interest rates will rise, and more jobs will go. Worse, another Third World debt crisis might be just around the corner, with banks from the advanced capitalist countries among its first casualties.

In April, following an earlier rush of crude prices to above US$40 per barrel, the International Energy Agency (IEA) did a detailed simulation projection, with help from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development and the International Monetary Fund, of the impact on the world economy if crude prices rose in a sustained way from US$25 to US$35 a barrel. The IEA study concludes that such a rise would drag the global gross domestic product down by 0.5% — or a net loss of US$255 billion — in the first year alone.

The “oil price” adopted by the IEA is an average of its 26 member countries’. The US crude oil benchmark, the West Texas Intermediate (WTI), is the most dominant price measure and is most often quoted in news reports.

The WTI hovered around US$30 in the second half of 2003. By October 22, however, it had gone as high as US$56.3. It has since eased to below US$50, however, the damage to the world economy of such a sustained big rise has far exceeded the scale envisaged by the IEA study. On October 25, Associated Press estimated that the world would have footed an extra oil bill of US$295 billion this year compared to 2003.
Another Third World debt crisis?

Such damage is not evenly spread, hitting the Third World much harder. Under the IEA scenario of a US$10 rise, the euro zone’s GDP would drop by 0.5%, the US by 0.3% and Japan by 0.4%. Asia’s GDP loss would average 0.8% (1% for India, 1.6% for the Philippines and 1.8% for Thailand) and the Sub-Saharan African countries exceed 3%.

On October 12, the World Bank’s chief economist, Francois Bourguignon, said that the oil price rises have already hurt poor countries’ “welfare” by 2-5%. To “absorb the shock”, said Bourguignon, oil-importing countries have been paying for the oil from their foreign exchange reserves, and then not topping up the reserves. He added that these reserves have already been depleted by up to 33%.

Many Third World countries’ foreign exchange reserves have already been depleted in order to service the enormous debts they have incurred as a consequence of their economic dependance. This opens the way for another round of defaulting in Third World debt repayment if the oil price hike drags on. Africa alone owes US$305 billion in foreign debt.

A number of factors are at play, including escalating uncertainties in Venezuelan supplies since the counter-revolutionary coup in April 2002; the stubborn resistance to the US occupation of Iraq, which threatens Iraqi oil pipelines; recent oil workers’ strikes in Nigeria and Norway; hurricanes’ devastation of US oil production and refineries in the Gulf of Mexico since September; uncertainties over the supplies from Russian oil giant Yukos; and China’s oil demand growth, forecast to be nearly 16% this year compared to the world’s average of 3.3%.
Monopoly

But it is not just these conjunctural factors at work. A typical trick in a monopolised industry is for capitalists to limit their own production capacity in order to squeeze up prices for the consequently scare product.

The heavy investments involved in oil exploration and production (upstream activities), down to refinery of crude into various fuel and other products (downstream), make the oil industry an easy target for monopoly domination.

The wave of nationalisation in oil production in the Third World since the 1960s and the rise of the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) as a unified bargaining tool has reduced the control of the huge oil companies over the industry in a significant part of the world. Nevertheless, by monopolising new technology and using its market dominance, Big Oil retains crucial control over the pump price.

US Senator Carl Levin’s statement to the US Senate on April 30, 2002, gives a rare glimpse on how major oil companies manipulate petroleum prices.

Levin stated: “During the spring of 2000, three major refiners determined it wasn’t in their economic self interest to produce any more RFG [reformulated gas/petrol] than that required to meet the demands… so in that year they produced 23% less RFG… That contributed to the short supply in the spot market for RFG, contributing to the price spike in spring 2000. While Marathon [a major US oil firm] did have surplus RFG, it withheld some of it from the market so as to not lower prices.

“In the summer of 2001, major refiners deliberately reduced gasoline [petrol] production, even in the face of unusually high demand… contributing significantly to the price spike of 2001.

“… demand fell and inventories rose following [9/11]…prices fell. As a result, refining profits fell and refiners cut back on production in order to obtain higher profits. Along with the increase in the price of crude oil and market speculation, these reductions in production and the increase in industry concentration significantly contributed to the run-up in price…

“Internal documents from several oil companies confirm that the oil companies view it to be in their economic interest to keep gas inventories low and the supply and demand balance tight.” Levin backed his assertion with a long list of internal documents from major oil companies.

A similar investigation by US Senator Ron Wyden presented in the US Senate on June 14, 2001, gave different evidence but drew the same conclusion about Big Oil’s ruthless profiteering. And according to an April 8 report of the US Congressional Research Service on petrol prices, no new refinery has been built in the US in the last 25 years.

This capacity-limiting strategy is not limited to the US. Quoting the IEA, the November 3 Washington Post reported that “international oil companies and countries’ national oil companies need to invest about $200 billion a year to keep up with demand but are falling 15 percent to 17 percent short”.

Oil majors have made clear they will only invest in new projects that will meet their profit targets, no matter how high oil prices may get.
Speculation

This capacity-limiting strategy has worsened capitalism’s problem of excess capital — that is, capital that can’t find a productive outlet, but is used for speculation. The amount of excess capital is responsible for the continuous formation of speculative “bubbles”, where excessive investment pushes the price of an asset above what its future earnings would justify.

The IT/telecom sector was the medium of such a bubble in the second half of the 1990s. It burst in early 2000. A housing/property bubble soon followed, practically worldwide. Oil is the latest “star”.

On October 5, the Associated Press quoted Fadel Gheit, a senior vice president in oil and gas research at the New York-based Oppenheimer & Co, as saying that “oil has become the only game in town… Every other [speculative] investment vehicle has disappointed over the last 12 months”.

Is the recent oil price hike also driven by a fundamental shortage of oil supply? Not in recent months. According to OPEC’s October “Monthly Oil Market Report”, while the world oil demand has increased from 79.17 million barrels per day (mb/d) in 2003 to 81.45 mb/d in the third quarter this year, OPEC has managed to provide a net surplus supply (in addition to oil provided by non-OPEC sources). OPEC oil is currently meeting about 40% of world demand.

Yet OPEC’s oil is not the most desired lately. It requires more intensive refining processes than the “lighter” or “sweeter” varieties that are in shorter supply, mostly because refineries have not activated or installed the capacity to create them. As a result, sweet crude has been most speculated about and its prices shot up.
Profiteering

Big Oil’s profiteering, assisted by speculation, is the most decisive reason for the recent oil price hike. While oil prices rose most sharply during the third quarter, British Petroleum’s profits leapt 43% to US$3.94 billion, Shell made US$4.4 billion, ExxonMobil US$5.7 billion and ConocoPhilips US$2 billion. The world’s top five oil firms made combined profits of US$53 billion in 2003.

The share price of ExxonMobil, the largest integrated oil company, jumped 30% in the year to October while that of Schlumberger, a key oilfield service provider, shot up 37%. Over the same period, Dow Jones Industrial average (a measure of the top US shares) climbed only 2%.

From Green Left Weekly, December 1, 2004.
Visit the Green Left Weekly home page.

Source: [[Green Left - Issues: Behind the petrol price jump|http://www.greenleft.org.au/2004/608/31299]]
<<tagCloud>>

<html><h4 style="text-align: left;">Cycling Groups </h4><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.bikeqld.org.au/">BikeQld Wiki</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.bikeqld.org.au/mailman/listinfo/bikeqld/">BikeQld Mailing List</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.bikely.com/">Bikely - Find Bike Routes</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://qutbug.googlepages.com">QUT Bicycle Users Group</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://riparianbug.googlepages.com/">Riparian Plaza Bicycle Users Group</a>&nbsp;</p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.bq.org.au/">Bicycle Queensland</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.bicycles.net.au">Bicycles Network Australia</a><br></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.rideabike.com.au/">Ride A Bike</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.cyclingpromotion.com.au/">Cycling Promotion Fund</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.bfa.asn.au/">Bicycle Federation of Australia</a></p><div style="text-align: left;"><br></div><h4 style="text-align: left;">Reference Material </h4><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.cyclingpromotion.com.au/"><b>Cycling Promotion Fund</b></a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.cyclingpromotion.com.au/content/category/3/35/147/">Fact Sheets - Issues</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.cyclingpromotion.com.au/content/category/3/7/146/">Fact Sheets - General</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.cyclingpromotion.com.au/content/category/3/37/150/">Fact Sheets - FAQ</a><b><br></b></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.ourbrisbane.com"><b>OurBrisbane.com</b></a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.ourbrisbane.com/activeandhealthy/recreation/cycling">Cycling in Brisbane</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au"><b>Brisbane City Council</b></a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/BCC:STANDARD:405979377:pc=PC_934">Brisbane Bikeways</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/BCC:STANDARD:399280590:pc=PC_73">Brisbane Transport Plan</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/BCC:BASE:895427314:pc=PC_2307">Walking &amp; Cycling Plan</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/BCC:STANDARD:1949876943:pc=PC_1860">City Center Masterplan</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.transport.qld.gov.au"><b>Queensland Transport</b></a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.transport.qld.gov.au/Home/General_information/Cycling/Strategy/">Qld Cycle Strategy</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.transport.qld.gov.au/cycling">QT Cycling Page</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.transport.qld.gov.au/Home/Projects_and_initiatives/Plans/Integrated_transport_plans/Integrated_regional_cycle_network_plan/">IRCNP - Maps</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.austroads.com.au/abc/"><b>Aust. Bicycle Council</b></a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.cyclingresourcecentre.org.au">Cycling Resource Centre</a>&nbsp;</p><p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.austroads.com.au/abc/">ABC Publications</a></p><p style="text-align: left;"><br></p><p style="text-align: left;"><br><script type="text/javascript">
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Brisbane's bus-stop blues
Article from: The Courier-Mail

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By Emma Chalmers

December 05, 2007 11:00pm

MORE than 100 buses each week are too full to stop for extra passengers and the problem is getting worse as Brisbane's population grows.

Last month, more than 500 Brisbane City Council buses were forced to drive past waiting passengers because they were too full to take on more commuters.

That is a 46 per cent increase on bus-full figures from November last year, when there were 351 full services.

    Have a transport nightmare of your own? Tell us about it 

Overcrowding problems escalated dramatically in April when a whopping 1749 services were so full they left passengers stranded and, while the numbers have reduced since then, overcrowding is worse now than it was a year ago.

 

Since February this year, more than 7700 buses have been too full to stop for more passengers, well ahead of the 5900 full buses recorded over the same period in 2006.

Some of the worst-affected services last month were the high-frequency BUZ routes.

The 130 BUZ service from Parkinson to the City was the most overcrowded bus route last month, with 61 buses too full to take on more commuters.

Route 333 (Chermside to the Cultural Centre) recorded 26 full buses and service 200 (Carindale to the City) had 42 full buses.

Commuters travelling from Bardon to Stafford via Fortitude Valley on the 375 service were left behind on 20 occasions last month and a similar number of overcrowded buses were reported on the 199 Teneriffe to Dutton Park service.

In the course of its transport survey, The Courier-Mail was unable to board several bus services because they were simply too full.

In one instance, The Courier-Mail was turned away by four overcrowded services on the southeast busway in the space of 15 minutes.

Mid last year Brisbane City Council received the results of a damning report by independent consultant Peter Forster, who warned commuters were developing "bus-stop rage" as overloaded buses, ferries and trains left without them.

The report called for another 50 buses to be added to the fleet before July this year in order to fix the growing problem.

Brisbane City Council will this year spend at least $62 million to put 94 rigid buses and 21 articulated or "banana" buses on the road by July next year.

Labor and Liberal councillors yesterday blamed each other for the continuing bus overcrowding problems.

Labor's public transport chairwoman Victoria Newton said she was delivering double the number of new buses this year than first proposed by the Liberals.

However Liberal transport spokesman Graham Quirk said the bus-full figures had dramatically worsened since Cr Newton took over the job last year.

Lord Mayor Campbell Newman has promised 110 new buses will be added to the fleet next year, while Labor's lord mayoral candidate has pledged 120 extra buses.

 

Source: [[Brisbane's bus-stop blues : The Courier-Mail|http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,23739,22876701-3102,00.html]]
Brisbane's tram system
Brisbane established its first horse tram in 1885. It's a hilly city, so this must have been tough for horses. Electric operation was introduced in 1897 with some imported trams, but local construction soon began. From 1907, single truck ten-bench trams were introduced, and in 1908, the two bogie dreadnought commenced service.

In 1923 the tramways were brought under one management, the Brisbane Tramways Trust, but two years later, the Brisbane City Council took over. It immediately set about modernising the fleet. The dropcentre tram appeared that year, and in 1938 the new streamlined FM was introduced.

By 1952, the network had expanded to 109 route kilometres (199 km of track). Ten years later, Brisbane trams were still going strong, despite the fact that trams had disappeared from many other Australian cities, and in spite of being under the control of a fiercely anti-tram Lord Mayor. Mayor Clem Jones, a member of the Labor Party, had views on public transport which were directly opposite to most in his party. He was quoted as saying that his ideal was for the working man to be driving his own car, not catching a tram.

But disaster struck. On 28-Sep-1962 Paddington tram depot just happened to catch fire, and burnt to the ground, destroying 65 trams. Old Dreadnought trams were pressed into service, and 8 replacement (Phoenix) trams were built, but Jones began to close lines almost immediately. Final closure came in April 1969.

One of those "Alice Through the Looking Glass" experiences that one often has when looking at Queensland politics has come again. The former National Party (conservative) State Government portrayed itself as pro-public transport, and the (then) opposition Labor Party as anti-PT (a la Clem Jones, 30 years ago), a claim which has a credibility problem anywhere else in the country. It proposed a new tram system for Brisbane, BrizTram, as an election stunt, but few people outside Queensland expected that it would ever be built afterwards (and perhaps few in Queensland either). But that government did not survive the election, and the new Labor Government has killed off the proposal. The Nationals can still claim that they are pro-public transport (since they did not have to follow through), and that Labor is anti- etc. etc. Everyone is happy. But there are no trams.

Source: [[Brisbane's trams|http://www.railpage.org.au/tram/brisbane.html]]
<html><span style="font-size: 13px;"><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/bre/sets/72157600351827235/show/"><b>View as slideshow</b></a>
	(<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/bre/sets/72157600351827235/show/" onclick="return pop_show(this);" title="open in a new window"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/www.flickr.com/images/icon_new_window.gif" style="border: medium none ;" alt="open in a new window" height="10" width="13"></a>)<br><br><br></span><h1>Videos <span>/ <em class="subject">Build a Single Speed Bike - Make: Video Podcast</em></span></h1>

    

        <div id="featured-video">
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            <h2 class="subject">Build a Single Speed Bike - Make: Video Podcast</h2>
            <div class="url"><a href="http://youtube.com/watch?v=01TPK7ChLmA">http://youtube.com/watch?v=01TPK7ChLmA</a></div>
            <p class="description">Make
your bike into a single speed hipster bike! This week Dave Neff joins
me to take some old broken bikes and mash them up into a new radical
ride. Everbody's experience will be different, but we rebuilt the
bottom bracket, put new wheels on, chopped and flipped the handlebars,
took off one of </p></div><br></html>
<html><h2>Build a Single Speed Bike - Make: PDFcast</h2>

<p><img src="http://blog.makezine.com/bikepdf1.jpg" alt="Bikepdf1" border="1" height="375" hspace="4" vspace="4" width="295"></p>

<p>This week the Make: PDFcast is a <a href="http://cachefly.oreilly.com/make/wp_bike.pdf">comicbook pdf</a>
all about converting your old trashy bike into a snazzy single speed
bike. I went a little nuts making it up in Comic Life. There's lots of
good tips in this pdf, but honestly, your best bet is to just get some
tools and go to town on your bike. It's always more fun to do this with
more people. This weekend, get some friends together for a bike hacking
party.</p>

<p><img src="http://blog.makezine.com/biketools.jpg" alt="Biketools" border="1" height="375" hspace="4" vspace="4" width="295"></p>

<p>Here's a tool list that is pretty comprehensive. Not pictured here
is a freewheel removal tool, which you could also just go to a shop and
borrow or WD-40. Doh!</p>

<p>Download the pdf here! - <a href="http://cachefly.oreilly.com/make/wp_bike.pdf">Link</a></p>
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Posted by Bre Pettis |
Jun 15, 2007 10:00 AM </html>
Fashionable Dane - complete with red boots - boarding the Intercity train to Copenhagen.
On local and regional trains you don't have to lift your bike up stairs, you just roll them on and place them in the bike racks on board. But this is the fast intercity train. Built for speed.

Here's a cool article about Danish [and Dutch] bike culture:

Building a Better Bike Lane
Bike-friendly cities in Europe are launching a new attack on car culture. Can the U.S. catch up?

By NANCY KEATES
COPENHAGEN — No one wears bike helmets here. They’re afraid they’ll mess up their hair. “I have a big head and I would look silly,” Mayor Klaus Bondam says.

People bike while pregnant, carrying two cups of coffee, smoking, eating bananas. At the airport, there are parking spaces for bikes. In the emergency room at Frederiksberg Hospital on weekends, half the biking accidents are from people riding drunk. Doctors say the drunk riders tend to run into poles. Flat, compact and temperate, the Netherlands and Denmark have long been havens for bikers. In Amsterdam, 40% of commuters get to work by bike. In Copenhagen, more than a third of workers pedal to their offices. But as concern about global warming intensifies — the European Union is already under emissions caps and tougher restrictions are expected — the two cities are leading a fresh assault on car culture. A major thrust is a host of aggressive new measures designed to shift bike commuting into higher gear, including increased prison time for bike thieves and the construction of new parking facilities that can hold up to 10,000 bikes.

The rest of Europe is paying close attention. Officials from London, Munich and Zurich (plus a handful from the U.S.) have visited Amsterdam’s transportation department for advice on developing bicycle-friendly infrastructure and policies. Norway aims to raise bicycle traffic to at least 8% of all travel by 2015 — double its current level — while Sweden hopes to move from 12% to 16% by 2010. This summer, Paris will put thousands of low-cost rental bikes throughout the city to cut traffic, reduce pollution and improve parking.

The city of Copenhagen plans to double its spending on biking infrastructure over the next three years, and Denmark is about to unveil a plan to increase spending on bike lanes on 2,000 kilometers, or 1,240 miles, of roads. Amsterdam is undertaking an ambitious capital-improvement program that includes building a 10,000-bike parking garage at the main train station — construction is expected to start by the end of next year. The city is also trying to boost public transportation usage, and plans to soon enforce stricter car-parking fines and increase parking fees to discourage people from driving.

Worried that immigrants might push car use up, both cities have started training programs to teach non-natives how to ride bikes and are stepping up bike training of children in schools. There are bike-only bridges under consideration and efforts to make intersections more rider-friendly by putting in special mirrors.

The policy goal is to have bicycle trips replace many short car trips, which account for 6% of total emissions from cars, according to a document adopted last month by the European Economic and Social Committee, an organization of transportation ministers from EU member countries. Another report published this year by the Dutch Cyclists’ Association found that if all trips shorter than 7.5 kilometers in the Netherlands currently made by car were by bicycle, the country would reduce its carbon-dioxide emissions by 2.4 million tons. That’s about one-eighth of the amount of emissions it would need to reduce to meet the Kyoto Protocol.

Officials from some American cities have made pilgrimages to Amsterdam. But in the U.S., bike commuters face more challenges, including strong opposition from some small businesses, car owners and parking-garage owners to any proposals to remove parking, shrink driving lanes or reduce speed limits. Some argue that limiting car usage would hurt business. “We haven’t made the tough decisions yet,” says Sam Adams, city commissioner of Portland, Ore., who visited Amsterdam in 2005. There has been some movement. Last month, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced a proposal to add a congestion charge on cars and increase the number of bicycle paths in the city. It would also require commercial buildings to have indoor parking facilities for bikes.

Even in Amsterdam, not everyone is pro-biking. Higher-end shops have already moved out of the city center because of measures to decrease car traffic, says Geert-Pieter Wagenmakers, an adviser to Amsterdam’s Chamber of Commerce, and now shops in the outer ring of the city are vulnerable. Bikes parked all over the sidewalk are bad for business, he adds.

Still, the new measures in Amsterdam and Copenhagen add to an infrastructure that has already made biking an integral part of life. People haul groceries in saddle bags or on handlebars and tote their children in multiple bike seats. Companies have indoor bike parking, changing rooms and on-site bikes for employees to take to meetings. Subways have bike cars and ramps next to the stairs.

Riding a bike for some has more cachet than driving a Porsche. Dutch Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende sometimes rides to work, as do lawyers, CEOs (Lars Rebien Sorensen, chief executive of Danish pharmaceutical giant Novo Nordisk, is famous for his on-bike persona) and members of parliament, often with empty children’s seats in back. Dutch Prince Maurits van Oranje is often seen riding around town. “It’s a good way to keep in touch with people on the streets,” says Tjeerd Herrema, deputy mayor of Amsterdam. Mr. Herrema’s car and driver still make the trip sometimes — to chauffeur his bag when he has too much work to carry.
Jolanda Engelhamp let her husband keep her car when they split up a few years ago because it was becoming too expensive to park. Now the 47-year-old takes her second-grade son to school on the back of her bike. (It’s a half-hour ride from home.) Outside the school in Amsterdam, harried moms drop off children, checking backpacks and coats; men in suits pull up, with children’s seats in back, steering while talking on their cellphones. It’s a typical drop-off scene, only without cars.

For Khilma van der Klugt, a 38-year-old bookkeeper, biking is more about health and convenience than concern for the environment. Her two older children ride their own bikes on the 25-minute commute to school while she ferries the four-year-old twins in a big box attached to the front of her bike. Biking gives her children exercise and fresh air in the morning, which helps them concentrate, she says. “It gets all their energy out.” She owns a car, but she only uses it when the weather is really bad or she’s feeling especially lazy.

Caroline Vonk, a 38-year-old government official, leaves home by bike at 8 a.m. and drops off her two children at a day-care center. By 8:15, she’s on her way to work, stopping to drop clothes at the dry cleaner or to buy some rolls for lunch. On the way home, she makes a quick stop at a shop, picks up the children and is home by 5:55. “It is a pleasant way to clear my head,” she says.

Teaching Newcomers

The programs for non-natives target those who view biking as a lower form of transportation than cars. “If they don’t start cycling it will hurt,” says Marjolein de Lange, who heads Amsterdam’s pro-bicycle union Fietsersbond and has worked with local councils to set up classes for immigrant women.
Bikes at the Amsterdam train station. Construction there begins soon on a 10,000-bike garage.
On a recent Sunday afternoon, 23 women — many in head-scarves — gathered at a recreational center north of Amsterdam to follow seven Fietsersbond volunteers to learn to navigate through traffic. The three-hour event cost €3 (about $4) and included practice weaving in and out of orange cones and over blocks of wood. It ended with all of the women gathering in a park for cake and lemonade.

Though she faltered at times, Rosie Soemer, a 36-year-old mother of two who came to the Netherlands from Suriname, was sold. “It is so much easier to go everywhere by bike,” she says. Learning to ride was her husband’s idea: He bought her a bicycle for her birthday a few months earlier and has been spending his lunch hour teaching her in a park. “It helps me if she can get around better,” says her husband, Sam Soemer. “And it’s safer than a car.”

Amsterdam and Copenhagen are generally safer for bikers than the U.S. because high car taxes and gasoline prices tend to keep sport-utility vehicles off the road. In Denmark, the tax for buying a new car is as high as 180%. Drivers must be over 18 to get a license, and the tests are so hard that most people fail the first few times. Both cities have worked to train truck drivers to look out for bikers when they turn right at intersections, and changed mirrors on vehicles and at traffic corners so they’re positioned for viewing cyclists.

As bike lanes become more crowded, new measures have been added to address bike safety. A recent survey found that people in Denmark felt less safe biking, though the risk of getting killed in a bike accident there has fallen by almost half. (The number of bicyclists killed fell to 31 in 2006 from 53 in 2004, and the number seriously injured dropped to 567 from 726 in that period.) According to one emergency room’s statistics, the primary reason for accidents is people being hit by car doors opening; second is cars making right-hand turns and hitting bikers at intersections; third is bike-on-bike crashes. Bike-riding police officers now routinely fine cyclists in Amsterdam who don’t have lights at night.

Parking for 10,000

Amsterdam is also working to improve the lack of parking. The city built five bike-parking garages over the past five years and plans a new one every year, including one with 10,000 spaces at the central railroad station. (While there’s room for 2,000 bikes now, there are often close to 4,000 bikes there.) But even garages aren’t enough. Bikers usually want to park right outside wherever they’re going — they don’t like parking and walking.

Combating theft is an important plank in developing a bike-friendly culture. In 2003, the city created the Amsterdam Bicycle Recovery Center, a large warehouse where illegally parked bikes are taken. (Its acronym in Dutch is AFAC.) Every bike that goes through AFAC is first checked against a list of stolen bikes. After three months, unclaimed models are registered, engraved with a serial number and sold to a second-hand shop. At any one time, the center has about 6,000 bikes neatly arranged by day of confiscation, out of an estimated total of 600,000 bikes in the city.

How AFAC will encourage bike riding in Amsterdam is a somewhat perverse logic, because it means some 200 bikes are confiscated by city officials a day compared to a handful before it existed. The thinking is that the more bikes that are confiscated, the more bikes can be registered and the better the government can trace stolen bikes. The less nervous people are that their bikes will be stolen, the more likely they are to ride. “Is your bike gone? Check AFAC first,” is the center’s slogan.

Remco Keyzer did just that on a recent Monday morning. The music teacher had parked his bike outside the central station before heading to a class and returned to find it gone. “I can be mad, but that really wouldn’t help me,” he says. Sometimes people ride away without paying the required fee. Bruno Brand, who helps people find their bikes at AFAC, says people get mad, but he explains it is the local police, not him, who confiscated the bike.

Within the past four years, the city increased the fine for buying or selling a bike in the street. Punishment for stealing a bike is now up to three months in jail.

Danish and Dutch officials say their countries might have been more congested if protests in the 1970s and 1980s had not sparked the impetus for building bicycle-lane networks. The arguments for more biking were mostly about health and congestion — only in the past year has the environment started to be a factor. Proponents of better infrastructure point to China as an example: In Beijing, where the economy has boomed, 30.3% of people commuted to work on bikes in 2005, down 8.2% from 2000, according to a survey by the Beijing Transportation Development Research Center and Beijing Municipal Committee of Communication.

Now, the Dansk Cyklist Forbund, the Danish Cyclist’s Federation, says that to make progress it can’t be too confrontational and must recognize that many bikers also have cars. “Our goal is the right means of transportation for the right trips,” says director Jens Loft Rasmussen.

In comparison, the rules of the American road can take some adjustment, as Cheryl AndristPlourde has found when she visits her parents in Columbus, Ohio. Last summer, the Amsterdam resident enrolled her 8-year-old daughter in a camp close to her parents’ house. The plan was for her daughter, who biked to school every day back home, to walk to camp. But her daughter whined about the 10-minute walk — all the other kids drove, she said — and the streets were too busy for her to bike. By the third day, Ms. AndristPlourde was driving her daughter to the camp.

Source: [[The Copenhagen Bicycle Culture Blog [It's Cycleliciousness!]: Search results for utility bicycle|http://cycleliciousness.blogspot.com/search?q=utility+bicycle]]
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The Federal Government subsidises some of the costs of child care. For a summary of the available subsidies see the list below, you can access more detailed information by clicking the name of the subsidy you are interested in.

Child Care Benefit (CCB) - more details

    * Paid as a lump sum at the end of the financial year or to the registered or approved child care provider as reduced fees throughout the year.
    * Can be claimed for up to 24 hours of care per child per week, or up to 50 hours if the parent(s) are studying, working or looking for work.
    * Payments are based on your family's annual income. To receive the maximum rate of CCB your family income must be less than $34,310 a year.

Grandparent Child Care Benefit (GCCB) - more details

    * Financial assistance for grandparents who have the primary responsibility for raising a grandchild.
    * Covers the full cost of fees for children in approved child care.
    * Can be claimed for up to 50 hours of care per child per week. There is no requirement for the grandparents to be working, training or studying.

30% Child Care Tax Rebate (CCTR) - more details

    * Covers 30 percent of your out-of-pocket expenses (total child care fees minus CCB) for approved child care.
    * Paid directly into your bank account at the end of the year that the child care fees are paid.
    * The maximum payment is $4,000 per child per year.

For more information on the subsidies described above visit the Family Assistance Office (FAO) website or call the FAO on 13 6150.
	

Source: [[Child care subsidies - an overview - CareforKids.com.au ®|http://www.careforkids.com.au/articlesv2/article.asp?ID=49]]
Childcare business spoonfed

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Stephen Lunn, Social affairs writer | February 28, 2008

ABC Learning Centre's decision to "jump with both feet" into the US childcare market had proved a significant problem for the provider, industry experts suggested yesterday.

Childcare policy expert Deborah Brennan said childcare businesses in Australia offered a stable income stream with hundreds of millions of dollars in government subsidies each year flowing directly to the owners rather than via parents, but the international experience was very different.

"They (ABC) depend on those government subsidies, and it's been the transition into the US market where they've really jumped in with both feet that's proven to be a problem," she said.

"In the US, some of the states have subsidies, but they are nowhere near the order of those in Australia. And in the UK there is a childcare tax credit, but it doesn't go direct to the service provider, it goes to the parent and has to make its way back to the provider, so that's a much less stable base of funding."

Professor Brennan, from the University of NSW's Social Policy Research Centre, said the US was also less consistent than the homegrown market when it came to childcare regulation, such as child-staff ratios, staff qualifications and building specifications.

"As in Australia, the regulations are very much state-based, but they range far more dramatically in the US," she said.

In June last year, ABC reported owning 1188 centres across Australia and New Zealand and 35 owned and 12 managed nurseries in Britain. In recent months it has expanded its interests in the US and now owns 1015 centres to become that country's second-biggest provider. While figures are hard to pin down, ABC's estimated control of the overall market in Australia ranges between 20 and 30 per cent across the board, and in some regions such as Victoria is understood to be even higher.

Ahead of last November's federal election, Labor offered a $1.5billion childcare policy, increasing the Child Care Tax rebate from 30 per cent to 50per cent of formal childcare costs to a new cap of $7500 a child.

Combined with the means-tested Childcare Benefit, some low-income families would have 85 per cent of childcare subsidised by government, Labor said. Even high-income earners would have about 66 per cent of their costs subsidised, much of it going straight to the provider.

"I've heard people say they've never seen a business like it ... government-subsidised, so an utterly reliable payer, and the price of the real estate going up and up, so it's a bit of a bonanza," Professor Brennan said.

But Lynne Wannan, convenor of the National Association of Community Childcare Centres, which represents 1100 not-for-profit centres, denied the business was a goldmine.

"When you have to conform with the quality requirements in Australia, our regulations, they're fairly strict and there really isn't a lot of money left over to make millions of dollars or to repay billions of loans, which they (ABC) have," she told ABC radio.

Longtime advocate on childcare issues Juliet Bourke said the Child Care Tax Rebate was seen as a great windfall for the childcare business, as their costs were effectively underwritten to the tune of 30 per cent, now at least 50 per cent under Labor's 2007 policy platform.
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Source: [[Childcare business spoonfed : The Australian|http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,23288077-20142,00.html]]
Childcare sector confident ABC Learning Centres will stay open

Posted 3 hours 23 minutes ago
The childcare sector is holding high hopes that the troubled ABC Learning Centres will not have to close it's doors. (File photo)

The childcare sector is holding high hopes that the troubled ABC Learning Centres will not have to close it's doors. (File photo) (AAP: Dave Hunt)

The community childcare sector doubts the share crisis involving the ABC Learning Centres will lead to its daycare doors closing in Australia.

ABC Learning Centres' share price has crashed, on fears about the company's debt and shares have been suspended from trade, as the company discusses the sale of part of the business.

Lynne Wannan from the Association of Community-Based Children's Services says it is still unclear how the situation will play out for families.

"I don't think that anyone can let the service system collapse because it's too huge, it's too enormous, there are too many families," she said.

"I'd be very surprised if suddenly doors closed or something like that."

The Federal Government is keeping watch over the childcare company and there are unconfirmed reports that US private equity firm Bain Capital Partners may be a possible buyer.

Federal Families Minister Jenny Macklin says childcare places must not be affected and Deputy Prime Minister Julia Gillard is watching developments closely.

"She is certainly on top of it," Ms Macklin said.

"We have to make sure that those childcare places are available. Families rely on them."

ABC Learning Centres founder Eddy Groves said childcare centres would not be affected, but it was revealed that he and his wife were forced to off-load shares during the tumble, due to margin lending arrangements.

The Groves' sold about $35 million worth of shares.

Source: [[Childcare sector confident ABC Learning Centres will stay open - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)|http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/02/28/2174708.htm]]
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We appreciate feedback, suggestions and questions...but not abuse (not that you'd offer it).

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Growing up fast … Eddy Groves's ABC Learning plans to expand at the rate of four new child-care centres a week.

Growing up fast … Eddy Groves's ABC Learning plans to expand at the rate of four new child-care centres a week.
Photo: Robert Rough
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March 11, 2006

What happens when the Government throws $2 billion into child care? Meet Fast Eddy Groves, Australia's newest multimillionaire. Ben Hills reports.

ON A muggy summer morning in a quiet street not far from Clovelly Beach, children bounce on battered, foam-filled vinyl cubes, the smell of frying hamburgers fills the air and the sound of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star wafts from a sunny day room.

The scene at the Clovelly Child Care Centre is one that is repeated at thousands of similar places around Australia every day of every working week as parents trudge off to work to pay the mortgage, leaving their children in the hands of carers. With two-thirds of mothers now working, demand is insatiable - Australia is short 100,000 places, a recent survey found.

The director of this centre is Maria Pender, a feisty campaigner for community centres such as Clovelly, a woman with close-cropped grey hair, a master's degree in education and little time for the large corporations which have muscled in on child care in recent years, turning a feelgood cottage industry into a stockmarket play.

The Clovelly centre, a red-brick building shaded with palm trees and sheltered behind a childproof fence, was built 21 years ago, one of hundreds of similar centres constructed across the country with joint federal and state funds, where parents could take their children for subsidised care. In the 1990s these subsidies were extended to privately owned centres, and then in 1997 the Howard Government stopped funding construction.

Since then centres such as Clovelly have been struggling to stay afloat. Almost overnight they lost their taxpayer-funded operating subsidy of $38,000 a year, and had to raise their fees. Twenty years ago, the centre charged $55 a week, says Pender. Today it's $55 a day for the 55 children who are two or over and $60 for those aged under two.

The centre still receives some money from the federal and state governments, but relies on "handyman dads" to help with maintenance. When it needed a "soft fall" mat of shredded rubber for the playground, the $9000 had to be raised at a trivia night. When they needed to expand, they took over and renovated "a decrepit scout hall" next door.

In spite of this, Pender says she has more than 400 parents on her waiting list. Yet this remains the only child-care centre in the suburb - the high cost of land, in an area where an ordinary suburban house can set you back $1 million, has deterred speculative private operators, although scarcely a month goes by without an opportunistic child-care centre broker dangling an offer under their noses.

Clovelly, sniffs Pender, is not for sale. Like most in community child care, she is convinced that private enterprise leads to increased prices and a fall in the quality of care, and places profit ahead of social obligations such as catering for children with disabilities or those aged under two, who are more expensive to look after. Big child-care companies, she says, cherry-pick affluent suburbs and ignore less well-off communities.

To see the new, corporate face of the child-care industry you have only to drive 10 minutes to the flash new twin-tower Westfield shopping centre at Bondi Junction. There, on the roof in a children's city of shops with such names as BonzaBrats, Esprit Kids and Treehouse "children's decor", is the latest acquisition by Australia's - and the world's - largest publicly listed child-care company, ABC Learning Centres Ltd.

Junction Juniors is so new that ABC's signage had not gone up yet and the 1800-number call centre in Brisbane, which handles enrolments nationwide, had never heard of it when the Herald rang last month. The acquisition was completed a month ago - one of 200 centres which ABC says it plans to build or take over this financial year, taking its total to 850 centres, close to a quarter of the Australian total.

An electronic security system guards the screened-off playground where children sink almost ankle-deep in spongy green artificial turf, the equipment is sparkling new and brightly coloured, soothing digital music is played through a laptop while half a dozen toddlers take their noon nap on custom-designed plastic stretchers. There are views over Sydney Harbour from the windows.

The mod cons come, of course, at a price - the daily rate for a four-year-old at this centre is $80. The good news is that - for now, at least - there are plenty of places. Junction Juniors opened in January and has dozens of vacancies - for those who can afford it.

The man behind ABC is a colourful Queensland businessman named Edmund Stuart Groves who favours aligator-skin boots, commutes by helicopter, drives a Ferrari and has impeccable Coalition connections.

Born in South Africa and resident on the Gold Coast, "Eddy" Groves was ranked No. 2 on BRW's list of the richest Australians aged under 40 last year, with an estimated wealth of $272 million.

As well as holding 14.5 per cent of ABC (with his wife and co-director Le Neve) Groves is a director of more than 40 other companies. He controls Quantum Foods, one of Queensland's largest milk distributors; he is a director of Bet Worldwide, which owns Canberra's online gaming venture Sports Acumen; and he is often seen courtside at Brisbane Bullets games, the erratic basketball team he owns.

But it is ABC which has catapulted Groves into wealth - and controversy.

He opened his first child-care centre in the Brisbane suburb of Ashgrove in 1989, when he was 22, and when he floated the company on the stock exchange in 2002 it was capitalised at $25 million. Fewer than four years later it is worth about $1.2 billion, the kind of growth that has not been seen since the dotcom bubble, and which earned Groves the nickname "Fast Eddy".

Hot on the heels of his success, six more child-care companies listed; however, three of them have since been swallowed by ABC, and the remaining three are struggling, with flagging share prices and industry speculation rife that Groves is planning another takeover. As well, last year Groves moved onto the international stage, buying the Learning Care Group from the babyfood giant Gerber, with 300 centres in the US and franchises in the Philippines, Hong Kong and Indonesia.

Groves has estimated that more than 70,000 children attend his Australian centres, one child in five of those in what is technically called "long day care". And he expects to continue expanding at the rate of four new centres a week through to 2008.

This dismays Lynne Wannan, the convener of the National Association of Community-Based Children's Services, who has recently returned from a tour of Canada campaigning to prevent an Australian-style "privatisation" of child-care services there.

The association formally objected to ABC's takeover of the rival Peppercorn group in 2004 to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, on the grounds that it would lead to regional monopolies. The commission allowed the takeover to go ahead after ABC gave undertakings to close some centres - it has shut or sold 60 - and not to buy any more in certain regional markets. Wannan says that in the past 15 years the number of privately run centres in Australia has risen from fewer than half the total to 70 per cent, with many community centres closing or being taken over.

"But instead of increased competition, lower prices and improved quality, the reverse has happened," she says. "It has led to a classic market failure."

According to an Australian Bureau of Statistics survey, the cost of child care rose 10 per cent last year, and is up 62 per cent in the past four years. Some Sydney centres are charging $100 a day. In a bid to forestall this, when he announced a backdating of the tax rebate in December 2004, the Treasurer, Peter Costello, warned operators not to exploit the subsidy by increasing fees. Six months later, ABC substantially increased its charges.

In a research paper late last year, Michael Messara, an analyst with finance house UBS, headlined ABC a "quality performer with legislated growth". By that, he meant the company had tapped into a rich seam of taxpayer funding which was underpinning its earnings with a government guarantee.

The Federal Government pays parents a means-tested subsidy for each child, ranging from $144 a week to $24.15 a week for parents earning more than $95,683. In addition, from July 1, 2004, there is a 30 per cent tax rebate on the balance of the cost of care, although parents have been upset by the fine print which caps the rebate at $4000 and postpones its payment for two years.

Messara has calculated that between 1990 and 2004, federal funding for child care has grown from $200 million a year to $1.5 billion, increasing at an annual rate of 14.4 per cent, or four times the annual economic growth rate. This year, with the first rebate payments, there will be close to $2 billion to be fought over by private corporations and community-based centres.

As Groves said in an interview with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation last year: "You cannot help [but] to make some money."

A spokesman for ABC - Groves declined five requests for an interview over five weeks - confirmed the company received 44 per cent of its income from government subsidies: $128 million of its $292 million revenue last year.

Messara's calculations give investors an even juicier insight. In the five years to 2008 he expects ABC to make net profits of $379 million. If that figure of 44 per cent remains constant, this will represent $167 million of taxpayers' money transferred directly into the pockets of Eddy and Le Neve Groves and their fellow shareholders - on top of the $400,000 salary packages the two receive.

Analysts such as Messara point to several reasons ABC is "best in class" as a child-care corporation, particularly the fact that Groves has crunched the demographics to find the best places to site his centres - "nappy valley" suburbs from Brisbane to Perth full of young families in higher socioeconomic groups who can afford the still-substantial child-care "gap" payments.

ABC also benefits from the economies of scale - centralised booking and purchasing of supplies - as well as the advantage of owning its own educational equipment company, and running two colleges where its thousands of mainly young and female workers can do their two-year diploma courses. Its business model, where the company hives off the real estate to property trusts, means it carries little debt.

But there is also a dark side to ABC's operations that is little discussed, because the company is fiercely litigious towards competitors and critics alike.

After complaints in 2004 that ABC had been underpaying its staff and forcing them to clean toilets and buy their own uniforms, the Queensland branch of the union that represents child-care workers, the Liquor, Hospitality and Miscellaneous Union, handed parents pamphlets which Groves says portrayed him as "mean and greedy" and implied he was "trying to drive down low wages of child-care workers to line his own pockets".

In an unprecedented action, Groves sued the union's Queensland secretary, Ron Monaghan, for defamation. This has had the extraordinary outcome that none of the union's officials contacted by the Herald would risk commenting on the pay or conditions of ABC staff.

The union's officer responsible for child-care workers in NSW, Jim Lloyd, said: "I am not able to comment on ABC at all." When asked whether this was connected with the litigation in Queensland, he said: "Good question."

So it has been left to MPs such as Labor's child-care spokeswoman, Tanya Plibersek, and Michael Danby, Labor's deputy whip in the House of Representatives, to take up the cudgels on behalf of ABC's workers. Speaking under parliamentary privilege in 2004, Danby said that to cut costs "ABC centres refuse to hire sufficient cleaners, refuse to pay staff a decent wage, and require staff to bring in their own music to play to children".

Even after the substantial rises granted this week, the minimum award rate for a child-care worker with one year's experience is $611 a week. However, ABC workers' pay cannot be independently verified because they are required to sign confidential agreements. Groves has pointed out that, in return, they are issued with 150 shares (currently worth $1200) as a signing bonus - and he says he has a low staff turnover rate of 8 per cent a year.

And then there is ABC's attitude towards its competitors.

"ABC is fiercely competitive … they are very dominant in the marketplace and they will fight to maintain their position of strength. [A child care centre] is a licence to print money," says Peter Dowling, chairman of the development assessment committee of the Redland Shire Council, a booming population centre between Brisbane and the Gold Coast which is a battleground for child-care companies. The shire has no fewer than 38 centres, with 10 more approved and five in the planning process.

Last year, a property development company called Petrac Ltd was given council approval for a creche as part of a retirement village it is building. ABC, which has a child-care centre nearby, lodged an objection with the Queensland Planning and Environment Court - and Petrac dropped its proposal.

"They made a commercial decision not to have the project held up forever while they fought a court case," Dowling says. "ABC has not insignificant resources."

As a result, the Redland community is short one child-care centre - Petrac gave the land to the council, and the council decided it would best be used as a park.

In South Australia, ABC also decided to battle a potential competitor - but in this case the child-care giant lost, in a case which was inevitably dubbed a David-and-Goliath contest with two local women who spent their life's savings to set up a centre in a converted medical centre in Tea Tree Gully, on the outskirts of Adelaide.

ABC, which operates a big, purpose-built centre 700 metres away, appealed against council approval of the centre to the South Australian Environment, Resources and Development Court, arguing that there were already sufficient places in the area, even though ABC planned to double the size of its own centre.

In her judgement, Judge Susanne Cole was scathing, saying ABC's argument "really amounts to the dressing up of a concern about commercial competition in planning language … I am satisfied that this appeal has been instituted solely for an improper purpose, namely the delay or prevention of the establishment of a child-care centre which will compete for business with [ABC's] existing, and expanding, child-care centres."

But it was a pyrrhic victory for Tara Roberts and Nicole Manning, the two women who own the centre. ABC appealed against this decision, costing the women thousands of dollars they could not afford, before the case was eventually settled on terms the women are not allowed to discuss.

"They tried to crush us," Roberts says. "They have left us struggling a tad behind the eight-ball."

ABC has also been forced to deny that its political connections have in any way unfairly advantaged it in its business dealings.

In the latest Australian Electoral Commission returns, for 2003 and 2004, Groves is listed as having donated $15,000 to the Queensland Liberal Party and $60,000 to its Coalition partner, the Nationals.

The former Liberal lord mayor of Brisbane, Sallyanne Atkinson, has chaired the company since its float; she earns $77,000 a year and holds 695,000 shares, worth more than $5 million. The former federal minister and Nationals MP Larry Anthony raised eyebrows when he joined the board in March last year, five months after losing his seat; he earns about $40,000 a year and latest returns show his family trust has been issued with 75,000 shares, worth about $600,000.

One month after Anthony joined the board, ABC won a contract to manage 19 Defence Department child-care centres around Australia. These centres had been run for more than 10 years by KU Children's Services, a 110-year-old not-for-profit chain based in NSW, with the help of a government subsidy.

Last year, says Michelle Underwood, KU's manager of long day-care centre services, the Government decided to withdraw the subsidy and put operation of the centres up for public tender.

"It was a significant policy shift and we did not know where that was coming from," Underwood says.

"We didn't believe you could deliver an acceptable standard of child care under those conditions."

The contract went to ABC, which also holds other significant contracts to manage child care for Westpac, Optus and ANZ Bank. Groves said Anthony had nothing to do with negotiating the Defence Department contract.

There have also been sporadic complaints about health and safety issues at ABC centres, which come under supervision by state children's services departments. ABC has been prosecuted in Victoria and in NSW, and in Queensland has had to respond to a case in which a child was seriously injured. Last April, a toddler went missing for 20 minutes after climbing the fence of the ABC centre on a busy road inHoppers Crossing, in Victoria. The company was found guilty of providing inadequate supervision and fined $200. It has appealed against the conviction.

In NSW, the Department of Community Services says it has prosecuted 34 child-care centres since 1996, only one of them operating under the ABC brand. Last September, ABC Learning Centres Ltd was ordered to pay $76,792 in fines and costs after an inspection of a centre at Wee Waa found mouse droppings on the floor and in bedsheets, redback spiders in an outdoor toy storage area accessible to children, and no smoke detectors. The company had also failed to keep "dangerous cleaning materials, disinfectants, poison, medication and other dangerous substances away from children".

In Queensland in 2002 a child suffered a fractured skull after a locker fell over at an ABC centre. The company later made a statement to the stock exchange saying that a claim for damages was being handled by its insurance company and that if it was sued it intended to "join" (include in the case) the manufacturer of the locker.

TALKING of the industry in general, rather than ABC in particular, Lynne Wannan says: "Standards have been lowered, poorly paid and inexperienced staff employed and dubious practices crept in as larger providers built bigger centres and strove to get economies of scale. As they became larger, they used predatory pricing to drive smaller, community-based services and even smaller private operators out of business."

And Fast Eddy?

He's just got richer and richer.

"I don't care about the criticism we receive," he said in that Canadian interview. "We have raised the standard enormously."

Source: [[Cradle snatcher - National - smh.com.au|http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/cradle-snatcher/2006/03/10/1141701698670.html?page=fullpage#contentSwap2]]
Yet, it’s difficult to imagine Eddy Groves and his company ever getting the soft-focus treatment from Australian Story. Why is that? Apart from the idea of making millions from caring for kids, here are just a few of the reasons we don't like Eddy or his business.

    * Much of Groves’ wealth is earned from the Australian taxpayer through family assistance payments, with the company hauling in up to $1 million a day from the federal government. ABC Learning is Australia’s most subsidised company. Financial analysts in favour of ABC stocks have called it “legislated growth”.
    * When a toddler escaped from a childcare centre in Hoppers Crossing in Victoria in 2004, the company was fined $200 for inadequate supervision. But the company appealed the decision, seeking to blame its low-level staff, thereby challenging the well-established legal principle of vicarious liability, which implies companies are responsible for the actions or omissions of their employees.
    * The Wal-Mart effect. As an acquisition-hungry behemoth, it has the financial clout to run smaller operations out of the industry, challenge regulators, and lower competition. Industry watchers also have concerns over the privatisation of childcare. The ACCC has ordered ABC to close centres in some regional areas and not open them in others.
    * Employee complaints over cost-cutting, overly strict budgeting and the impact of staff workloads on the quality of supervision. Parents have complained that advertised menus did not match the food their little one was served. And, some centres have replaced real grass with synthetic grass.
    * Accusations of political cronyism. Just five months after losing his seat at the 2004 election, Larry Anthony, the former Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, found a new job as a non-executive director at ABC Learning. As the ALP’s Tanya Plibersek said at the time: “As a minister he set up a situation where childcare fees went through the roof, and now he's on the board of the company that will benefit most from those fee increases.”
    * Problems with accountability. According to this article, Queensland Maintenance Services (QMS) did $100 million worth of work for ABC between 2003 and 2006, and QMS director Frank Zullo is Eddy Groves’ brother-in-law. The work was not tendered, nor was it noted in the company’s public documents that the work was given to a family member.
    * The cheek of ripping off the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's acronym. Kids love watching ABC TV. Critics say it was a cynical move to co-opt the national broadcasters name in a bid for some name recognition. 

Send your tips to boss@crikey.com.au, submit them anonymously here or SMS tips and photos to 0427 TIP OFF.

Source: [[Crikey - Why we don't like Eddy and his ABCs - Why we don't like Eddy and his ABCs|http://www.crikey.com.au/Business/20080227-Why-we-dont-like-Eddy-and-his-ABCs.html]]
Summary of CRAG arguments

For the benefit of the casual browser. Most if not all of the following are covered in detail in other documents on this Web site.

    * Governments introduced helmet laws without real proof of helmet effectiveness; without proper community consultation; bypassing democratic principles and standards; and without due consideration of other factors such as that there would be a decline in cycling.
    * Numbers of cyclists have declined enormously since the law, and although cycling may have since increased, evidence indicates that the level is still below what would have been expected had there been no law.
    * More people have given up cycling or continued to ride helmetless than have worn a helmet because of the law.
    * The estimated number of head injuries per cyclist has not decreased since the law despite increased helmet wearing rates.
    * Many of the scientific studies in support of the law have been proven flawed - usually due to limitations in their data or methodology.
    * 'My helmet saved my life' anecdotes prove little towards the effect of enforcing helmets on an entire population, and notwithstanding the tendency for people to exaggerate their claims. Anecdotes can be a compelling argument for individuals to choose to wear helmets, but do not constitute the scientific evidence which should be a pre-requisite to legislation.
    * Some studies have indicated helmet wearers to be more likely to strike their heads and/or have an accident. There is a rational explanation for this phenomena. Wearing a helmet increases the size and mass of the head, and helmet wearers may also be subject to risk compensation.
    * Studies of the mechanics of head injury show that the most serious contributor to brain injury are rotational forces, which helmets can do little or nothing to prevent and may actually increase.
    * Helmets can have little benefit in a severe collision with a motor vehicle. Bicycle helmets are certified only for simple falls.
    * Don't even think about civil liberties, you don't have any. Wear a helmet or else! Just as compulsory motorbike helmets were used to justify compulsory seatbelts, and compulsory seatbelts in turn were used to justify compulsory bicycle helmets, there can be little doubt that at some point in the future the bicycle helmets law will be used to justify other breeches of civil liberties.
    * The helmet law has fundamentally failed in its stated aim of reducing head injury, to say nothing of the adverse effects, but the Government has so far refused to review it.

Source: [[Cyclists Rights Action Group (CRAG)|http://members.pcug.org.au/~psvansch/crag/index.html]]
Debt concerns slash ABC Learning's share price

Posted Tue Feb 26, 2008 6:42pm AEDT
Updated Tue Feb 26, 2008 9:03pm AEDT
Eddy Groves has refused to say whether he has been forced to sell off stock amid the share price dive.

Eddy Groves has refused to say whether he has been forced to sell off stock amid the share price dive. (Inside Business)

    * Video: Playtime over for childcare mogul (7.30 Report)
    * Audio: Clime Capital Limited chairman Roger Montgomery discusses ABC Learning's deficiencies (ABC News)
    * Audio: ABC Learning Centres share prices drops 40 pc (PM)

The childcare chain ABC Learning Centres is the latest company to succumb to fears over its debt levels.

ABC Learning's half-year earnings have dropped by 42 per cent to $37.1 million, prompting investor concerns about the company's debt structure.

At one stage today, shares dropped 70 per cent to touch a six-year low of $1.15, but have closed at $2.14.

Clime Capital Management chairman Roger Montgomery is scathing, saying the share price has long overvalued the company.

"It's gone from being a highly-profitable small business, to only a mediocre or less than mediocre large business," he said.

Mr Montgomery says the market has today taken the ABC's shares to their true value and has questioned some of the company's financial decisions.

"It has raised from its owners, or from its shareholders, $2.5 billion of equity over the last five years and consistently employed that equity at lower and lower rates of return," he said.

"It's now generating a return for its owners that is less than what you can get in a term deposit."

The company's chief executive Eddy Groves says investors have clearly been disappointed by the profit result, but the company is equipped to meet its debt obligations.

He says the tumble will not force the closure of any of its centres.

"It's the share price and the share market, but there's no effect to our business," he said.

But Mr Groves has refused to say whether he has been forced to sell off stock amid the share price dive.

He and some of the company's directors have margin loans on the stock, meaning they have bought shares with borrowed money.

"I won't comment on my personal situation," Mr Groves said.

"If I buy stock or sell stock, I have to announce it to the market within 48 hours and that's what I'd do."

Tags: business-economics-and-finance, company-news, australia

Source: [[Debt concerns slash ABC Learning's share price - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)|http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/02/26/2173341.htm]]
[[Tag Directory]][[RatbagMedia]]

Thursday, 10 January 2008
an interview with Roberto Perez the permaculturalist

I decided that it might be a good idea to come up with a few specific questions for Roberto Perez of FANJ. I know I have a habit of leading conversations off track a bit. We'll see how it goes! [As you will read, I did lead the conversation off quite a bit, Roberto and I stayed talking from 2pm until we were kicked out of the office at closing time].

To give a bit of background... Roberto Perez was trained as a biologist and came to work with FANJ very early on in his career. He was involved in the Cuban urban agriculture movement from its beginnings. In fact, he was at the airport when the first permaculture designers came from Australia in the early 1990s. He was taught permaculture design from the Australians (along with English and an Aussie accent which has since become diluted). Since then, he has helped design and build demonstration gardens throughout Havana and trained hundreds of others in Permaculture design methods. He has also travelled extensively (rare for a Cuban) to see similar projects in other countries, especially Canada. He did a Postgraduate Diploma at St. FX in Antigonish, just 2 hours from my home!

Here goes my preposed questions:

[I only transcribed notes of Roberto's responses, a transcript would be pages long.]

"As a designer from a different culture, different climate and different economy, what would you say are the most precious 'jems of knowledge' that I should take back with me? I will be presenting my findings to a groups of ecological designers."

FLEXABLE POLITICAL WILL

The biggest enabling factor for the success and eventual integration of the work was flexable political will. This is especially true when it comes to land-use policy. Support for sustainable food systems came direct from the top (Fidel) and laws were altered and practises adapted that suited the development of urban agriculture. Roberto noted that this type of change is not so easy in a capitalist system where land has, what he described as, 'different value'. A good example of this flexability is the clearing and cleaning of vacant lots in Havana. As is common in Britian, vacacnt city lots in Havana gathered rubbish and debris (especially in the 1980s). Masses of red tape and petty quarrels between neighbours often kept these lots in a state of dis-repair. Changes in policy allowed these lots to be cleared and used for gardens. Roberto says that in other countries this would probably never happen. In other countries we often see vacant lots gathering rubbish with chain link fences around them preventing any useful use! In Cuba land only has value related to its usefulness, rather than speculative value.


MARKET FLEXABILITY

The socialist collective supply market was just as rigid [perhaps even moreso] as western capitalist markets. The political will that allowed changes in how food was marketed in Cuba found this truth: 'there is always space in the market for a variety of services'. For instance, there are rules that prevent small allotment gardeners in Britian from selling their produce. These rules are meant to protect farmers, who make their only livelihood from selling food. Cuban officials feared failure of the large collective farms and state price controls by allowing an alternative market. In reality, the state supplied food still plays a large part in the Cuban diet and will continue to do so. [At this point I added the comment that TESCO or Sainsbury's has nothing to fear from market gardeners. They are well suited to adapt and by no means fill all the 'needs' of the market.] Market regulators need to adjust rules to scale. The many food safety and tracability laws do help protect us from poor quality food, but do not make sense applied to a small vendor selling bottles of home made jam.

FOOD INDUSTRY LABOUR MARKET

Working in food production in Cuba pays well. This attracts innovative, intelligent and industrious workers. This isn't the same in other countries for many reasons. In order for the system to be sustainable something needs to be done to change this.

PLANNING AND DESIGN OF PUBLIC SPACES

Designers and planners have to rethink public spaces, especially parks and green spaces. There exists an absurd distinction between ornimental and productive horticulture. Edible plants need to be given a greater emphasis in public areas. This is still forthcoming in Cuba and a current FANJ project is dealing with this. Standard architectural rendering show shrubs and trees outside buildings, sometimes even inside. Why not apple or pear trees, berry hedges?

PLANNING OF GARDEN SPACE

There are physical limits with plants and space. There are also relationships to efficiency and size, labour requirements and economic sense when it comes to gardens. This is what has been discovered in Havana. In order of least productive to most productive: Home Garden, Allotment, Collective, and Community. This is also connected to size. However, we must not simply interpret this as 'bigger is better'. There are appropriate uses for each. That being said, it must be understood that the scale of productivity is not completely linear. When thinking of planning, a collective garden that supplies 5 families is probably a little smaller in total size than 5 family sized allotments. Efficiencies are gained in the layout and sharing of things like shed space, which makes sense but actual productivity is much much higher than an allotment and labour requirements per person are lower. The problem then becomes a social one. Cubans have developed various and flexable social system to suit collectives. They are usually based simply on labour. All production is based on number of hours worked in the garden.

CHEAP, HEALTHY AND FRESH

Locally grown food is cheap, healthy and fresh. Probably the most important one is cheap, in Cuba the farmer's markets are much much cheaper than the supermarkets. It is also much fresher. Farmer's markets in northern countries are expensive and thus limit their market.

"In Britian we faced a food crisis from 1939 to well into the 1950s. As an island nation that was highly dependant on trade, the war had a dramatic impact on daily life and people's perceptions of food. This response, however, was seen more as a 'war measure' that was quickly abandoned than a long term solution. As Cuba emerged from the 'Special Period', what has made these measures, such as urban agriculture, become long term solutions?"

The answer is basically twofold:
-Political will... see answer from above.
-It makes economic sense, urban farmers in Cuba tap in to a very lucritive market economy earning more than they would doing other jobs.

I concluded my conversation with Roberto speaking about possible collaborations with my contacts in Scotland and arranged a second meeting as it was time to go.

Source: [[Design and Salutogenic Food Systems: an interview with Roberto Perez the permaculturalist|http://salutogenicsteve.blogspot.com/2008/01/interview-with-roberto-perez.html]]
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	 "ul.suckerfish ul li {\n"+
	 "	float: none;\n"+
	 "	border-right: 0;\n"+
	 "	border-left:0;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish a, ul.suckerfish a:hover {\n"+
	 "	display: block;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish li a.tiddlyLink, ul.suckerfish li a, #mainMenu ul.suckerfish li a {font-weight:bold;}\n"+
	 "/**** END LAYOUT STYLES *****/\n"+
	 "\n\n"+
	 "/**** COLORS AND APPEARANCE - DEFAULT *****/\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish li a {\n"+
	 "	padding: 0.5em 1.5em;\n"+
	 "	color: #FFF;\n"+
	 "	background: #0066aa;\n"+
	 "	border-bottom: 0;\n"+
	 "	font-weight:bold;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish li:hover a, ul.suckerfish li.sfhover a{\n"+
	 "	background: #00558F;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish li:hover ul a, ul.suckerfish li.sfhover ul a{\n"+
	 "	color: #000;\n"+
	 "	background: #eff3fa;\n"+
	 "	border-top:1px solid #FFF;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish ul li a:hover {\n"+
	 "	background: #e0e8f5;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish li a{\n"+
	 "	width:9em;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish ul li a, ul.suckerfish ul li a:hover{\n"+
	 "	display:inline-block;\n"+
	 "	width:9em;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish li {\n"+
	 "	border-left: 1px solid #00558F;\n"+
	 "}\n"+
	 "/***** END COLORS AND APPEARANCE - DEFAULT *****/\n"+
	 "\n\n"+
	 "/***** LAYOUT AND APPEARANCE: VERTICAL *****/\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish.vertical li{\n"+
	 "	width:10em;\n"+
	 "	border-left: 0px solid #00558f;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish.vertical ul li, ul.suckerfish.vertical li a, ul.suckerfish.vertical li:hover a, ul.suckerfish.vertical li.sfhover a {\n"+
	 "	border-left: 0.8em solid #00558f;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish.vertical li a, ul.suckerfish.vertical li:hover a, ul.suckerfish.vertical li.sfhover a,  ul.suckerfish.vertical li.sfhover a:hover{\n"+
	 "	width:8em;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish.vertical {\n"+
	 "	width:10em; text-align:left;\n"+
	 "	float:left;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish.vertical li a {\n"+
	 "	padding: 0.5em 1em 0.5em 1em;\n"+
	 "	border-top:1px solid  #fff;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish.vertical, ul.suckerfish.vertical ul {\n"+
	 "	line-height:1.4em;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish.vertical li:hover ul, ul.suckerfish.vertical li.sfhover ul { \n"+
	 "	margin: -2.4em 0 0 10.9em;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish.vertical li:hover ul li a, ul.suckerfish.vertical li.sfhover ul li a {\n"+
	 "	border: 0px solid #FFF;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish.vertical li:hover a, ul.suckerfish.vertical li.sfhover a{\n"+
	 "	padding-right:1.1em;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "ul.suckerfish.vertical li:hover ul li, ul.suckerfish.vertical li.sfhover ul li {\n"+
	 "	border-bottom:1px solid  #fff;\n"+
	 "}\n\n"+
	 "/***** END LAYOUT AND APPEARANCE: VERTICAL *****/\n"+
	 "/*}}}*/";
store.addNotification("StyleSheetDropDownMenuPlugin",refreshStyles);
//!END-PLUGIN-CODE
// %/
<html><h3>Dutch Cycle Promotion</h3>
<p>If often seems that the English speaking world does not understand
how the Dutch have been so successful with their cycle promotion. Why
is it that the Netherlands has a cycling rate which is so far ahead of
the rest of the world, and growing ?</p>
<p>It is also quite often assumed that Dutch drivers must be far better
behaved than those in the UK and other countries in order that cyclists
can have such a good degree of safety. Or the reason is put down to the
country being relatively flat. However, these things couldn't possibly
explain why the Dutch cycle for 20x as many journeys as people in
English speaking countries do.</p>
<p>It actually comes down to a single point. Generally when you cycle
in the Netherlands you are not sharing space with cars. This makes
cycling very pleasant and relaxed. It reduces conflict with motorists
and it leads to much greater safety. What isn't necesarily so obvious
to outside observers from locations with less advanced cycling
infrastructure is that it also leads to cyclists having journeys which
are more direct than those of motorists. As a result, cycling is a much
more appealing form of transport.</p>
<p>Flatness doesn't necessarily help. It results in very strong
headwinds. Also, the Netherlands can be very cold and wet in the
winter. However, the convenience of cycling wins out over these
problems.</p>
<p>In order to show people the situation in this country and how favourable it is for cyclists, we run <a href="http://hembrow.eu/cycling/studytour.html">Study Tours</a>.
However, we also provide here pointers to information about Dutch
cycling provision from the people who implement it. Most of the
articles produced by the Dutch are in the Dutch language. However, I
have collected together here some English language documents.</p>
<h5>Fietsberaad articles</h5>
<p>These articles are all from the <a href="http://www.fietsberaad.nl/" target="_blank">Fietsberaad</a>
- a government organisation involved in cycle promotion with
representatives from cities and organisations around the Netherlands.</p>
<p><a target="_blank" href="http://hembrow.eu/tmp/CyclingPolicies.pdf">Cycling Policies of Ten cycle friendly cities</a>.
Includes a plot of cycle usage over time for cities with a lot of
cycling and cities with less cycling. Shows that cycle usage in cities
with low cycle usage now was historically much higher. Photos of mass
cycle use before the second World War Two and in moden times.</p>
<p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fietsberaad.nl/library/repository/bestanden/Cycling%20in%20the%20Netherlands%20VenW.pdf">Cycling in the Netherlands</a>.</p>
<p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fietsberaad.nl/library/repository/bestanden/14397_pn4_public_bikes_ok_low.pdf">Public Bicycles Policy Notes</a></p>
<p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fietsberaad.nl/library/repository/bestanden/The%20Dutch%20Bicycle%20Master%20Plan%201999.pdf">The Dutch Bicycle Master Plan 1999</a>
- covers history from the 1890s and policy up to 1999. Includes such
gems as that the first guarded cycle storage was opened in 1895, the
first cycle paths around the same time. Goes over the decline of
cycling followed by its return, and recent Dutch policies on building
cycle paths which have increased cycling and decreased the rate of
accidents.</p>
<p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fietsberaad.nl/library/repository/bestanden/document000095.pdf">Facts about cycling in the Netherlands 2001</a>
- referring to Dutch Bicycle Master Plan of 1999. This document
contains a lot of detailed statistics about how many trips are made by
different modes of transport, by different ages etc.</p>
<p>There are also databanks of ideas which though they are in Dutch may provide some inspiration:</p>
<p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fietsberaad.nl/index.cfm?section=Voorbeeldenbank">Example bank</a>
- this features photos of different types of cycle infrastructure
(select Crosspoints, Road craft, Cycle Parking from the menu on the
left).</p>
<h5>Fietsersbond articles</h5>
<p>These articles are from <a href="http://www.hembrow.eu/cycling/www.fietsersbond.nl" target="_blank">Fietsersbond</a> - the national cyclists union of the Netherlands.</p>
<p><a taregt="_blank" href="http://www.fietsersbond.nl/urlsearchresults.asp?itemnumber=13669&amp;viewtype=popup">Fietsparkeur</a> - a system of approval for cycle parking.</p>
<p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fietsersbond.nl/urlsearchresults.asp?itemnumber=13670&amp;viewtype=popup">Bicycle Parking at Dutch Railway Stations</a>.</p>
<p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fietsersbond.nl/urlsearchresults.asp?itemnumber=13666&amp;viewtype=popup">Tips for locking bicycles and spotting stolen bicycles</a> - The Dutch have quite a big cycle theft problem.</p>
<h4>Dutch Language Documents from Assen which may be of interest</h4>
<p>I've collected here some Dutch language documents which are not too
difficult to understand for the English speaking reader. These all
relate to Assen.</p>
<p><a href="http://www.assen.nl/Docs/internet_nl/Thema%20Verkeer%20en%20Vervoer/Nota%20Fietsverkeer/FietsplanKloosterveen1.pdf" target="_blank">Fietsplan Kloosterveen</a>
- Kloosterveen is a new housing development in Assen. This is the
cycling plan, showing the standard of provision that new developments
are required to have in the Netherlands.</p>
<a name="assenexpenditure"></a>
<p><a href="http://www.assen.nl/Docs/internet_nl/Thema%20Verkeer%20en%20Vervoer/Nota%20Fietsverkeer/uitvoeringsprogramma2005-2006.pdf">Expenditure on cycling in Assen in 2005/2006</a> - nearly €6M. The population is 63000, so that works out as a little over €90 per person per year.</p>
<p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.assen.nl/Docs/internet_nl/Thema%20Verkeer%20en%20Vervoer/Nota%20Fietsverkeer/Nota%20Fietsverkeer.pdf">Cycle Transport Notes</a> - September 2005 document about cycling in Assen. What needs to happen over the next 5 years.</p>
<p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.assen.nl/Docs/internet_nl/Thema%20Verkeer%20en%20Vervoer/Nota%20Fietsverkeer/actieprogramma2007-2010.pdf">Action programme for 2007-2010</a> - works to be done on cycle paths.</p>
<h4>Danish documents</h4>
<p>The Danes also produce some good cycling literature in English.</p>
<p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fietsberaad.nl/library/repository/bestanden/document000060.pdf">Copenhagen Bicycle Account 2002</a>.</p>
<h4>Norway</h4>
<p><a href="http://www.trampe.no/english/" target="_blank">Trondheim bicycle lift</a>.</p>
<h4>UK</h4>
<p><a href="http://www.eco-logica.co.uk/pdf/wtpp13.3.pdf" target="_blank">Eco-logica.co.uk report on 6 European cities</a>.</p>
<p><a href="http://www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/sustainable/cycling/cyclingfuture.pdf" target="_blank">Sustainable Future for cycling</a>
a document from the department of transport which contains figures for
the low amounts spent in the UK, and the limited results they have had.
This focuses on showing impressive looking figures, such as 172000
extra cycle journeys being made per year by 10000 households in
Brighton. However, given an average of 3 people per household, that
actually amounts to only around 5 journeys per year per person. It is
similar on money spent. Divide their figures by the number of people
the money is being spent on.</p>
<h3>Videos</h3>
<p>Dutch bicycle masterplan 1990. Things have of course moved on since
this film was made nearly 20 years ago. However, this is what is
interesting. While some other countries drop their targets, the Dutch
met theirs. They have now set new targets for increase in cycling.</p>
<object height="355" width="425"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/QExnRr9VAJw&amp;rel=0"><param name="wmode" value="transparent"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/QExnRr9VAJw&amp;rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" height="355" width="425"></object>
<h3>Photos</h3>
<p>We have a separate web page with photos of <a href="http://www.hembrow.eu/cycling/photos.html">Dutch cycling facilities</a>.</p>
<h3>Other Green Initiatives</h3>
<p>The Dutch also lead the way in Europe on recycling. They have many
pragmatic means to reduce the amount thrown out and to encourage
recycling of waste. We have a webpage on our experiences with <a href="http://hembrow.eu/personal/rubbish.html">Waste reduction and re-cycling in Assen</a>.</p>
<h3>About Us</h3>
<p>Judy and David Hembrow are experienced English cyclists who moved to the Netherlands in 2007.</p>
<p>We run <a href="http://www.hembrow.eu/cycling/studytour.html">Cycling Study Tours</a> and <a href="http://hembrow.eu/cycling">Cycling Holidays</a> from our new home in <a href="http://www.hembrow.eu/cycling/assen.html">Assen</a>.</p>
<p>We're also available to organise rides of any duration and group size
to suit individuals, families or organisations. These can be a
variation on the rides we already organise or something different. If you are
interested, <a target="_blank" href="https://mail.google.com/mail?view=cm&amp;tf=0&amp;ui=1&amp;to=david@hembrow.eu">get in touch</a>.</p></html>
/***
|''Name:''|EasyEditPlugin|
|''Description:''|Lite and extensible Wysiwyg editor for TiddlyWiki.|
|''Version:''|1.3.3|
|''Date:''|Dec 21,2007|
|''Source:''|http://visualtw.ouvaton.org/VisualTW.html|
|''Author:''|Pascal Collin|
|''License:''|[[BSD open source license|License]]|
|''~CoreVersion:''|2.1.0|
|''Browser:''|Firefox 2.0; InternetExplorer 6.0|
!Demo
*On the plugin [[homepage|http://visualtw.ouvaton.org/VisualTW.html]], see [[WysiwygDemo]] and use the {{{write}}} button.
!Installation
#import the plugin,
#save and reload,
#use the <<toolbar easyEdit>> button in the tiddler's toolbar (in default ViewTemplate) or add {{{easyEdit}}} command in your own toolbar.
! Useful Addons
*[[HTMLFormattingPlugin|http://www.tiddlytools.com/#HTMLFormattingPlugin]] to embed wiki syntax in html tiddlers.<<br>>//__Tips__ : When this plugin is installed, you can use anchor syntax to link tiddlers in wysiwyg mode (example : #example). Anchors are converted back and from wiki syntax when editing.//
*[[TaggedTemplateTweak|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#TaggedTemplateTweak]] to use alternative ViewTemplate/EditTemplate for tiddler's tagged with specific tag values.
!Configuration
|Buttons in the toolbar (empty = all).<<br>>//Example : bold,underline,separator,forecolor//<<br>>The buttons will appear in this order.| <<option txtEasyEditorButtons>>|
|EasyEditor default height | <<option txtEasyEditorHeight>>|
|Stylesheet applied to the edited richtext |[[EasyEditDocStyleSheet]]|
|Template called by the {{{write}}} button |[[EasyEditTemplate]]|
!How to extend EasyEditor
*To add your own buttons, add some code like the following in a systemConfig tagged tiddler (//use the prompt attribute only if there is a parameter//) :
**{{{EditorToolbar.buttons.heading = {label:"H", toolTip : "Set heading level", prompt: "Enter heading level"};}}} 
**{{{EditorToolbar.buttonsList +=",heading";}}}
*To get the list of all possible commands, see the documentation of the [[Gecko built-in rich text editor|http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Midas]] or the [[IE command identifiers|http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms533049.aspx]].
*To go further in customization, see [[Link button|EasyEditPlugin-LinkButton]] as an example.
!Code
***/

//{{{

var geckoEditor={};
var IEeditor={};

config.options.txtEasyEditorHeight = config.options.txtEasyEditorHeight ? config.options.txtEasyEditorHeight : "500px";
config.options.txtEasyEditorButtons = config.options.txtEasyEditorButtons ? config.options.txtEasyEditorButtons : "";

// TW2.1.x compatibility
config.browser.isGecko = config.browser.isGecko ? config.browser.isGecko : (config.userAgent.indexOf("gecko") != -1); 
config.macros.annotations = config.macros.annotations ? config.macros.annotations : {handler : function() {}}


// EASYEDITOR MACRO

config.macros.easyEdit = {
	handler : function(place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramString,tiddler) {
		var field = params[0];
		var height = params[1] ? params[1] : config.options.txtEasyEditorHeight;
		var editor = field ? new easyEditor(tiddler,field,place,height) : null;
	},
	gather: function(element){
		var iframes = element.getElementsByTagName("iframe");
		if (iframes.length!=1) return null
		var text = "<html>"+iframes[0].contentWindow.document.body.innerHTML+"</html>";
		text = config.browser.isGecko ? geckoEditor.postProcessor(text) : (config.browser.isIE ? IEeditor.postProcessor(text) : text);
		return text;
	}
}

// EASYEDITOR CLASS

function easyEditor(tiddler,field,place,height) {
	this.tiddler = tiddler;
	this.field = field;
	this.browser = config.browser.isGecko ? geckoEditor : (config.browser.isIE ? IEeditor : null);
	this.wrapper = createTiddlyElement(place,"div",null,"easyEditor");
	this.wrapper.setAttribute("easyEdit",this.field);
	this.iframe = createTiddlyElement(null,"iframe");
	this.browser.setupFrame(this.iframe,height,contextualCallback(this,this.onload));
	this.wrapper.appendChild(this.iframe);
}

easyEditor.prototype.onload = function(){
	this.editor = this.iframe.contentWindow;
	this.doc = this.editor.document;
	if (!this.browser.isDocReady(this.doc)) return null;
	
	if (!this.tiddler.isReadOnly() && this.doc.designMode.toLowerCase()!="on") {
		this.doc.designMode = "on";
		if (this.browser.reloadOnDesignMode) return false;	// IE fire readystatechange after designMode change
	}
	
	var internalCSS = store.getTiddlerText("EasyEditDocStyleSheet");
	setStylesheet(internalCSS,"EasyEditDocStyleSheet",this.doc);
	this.browser.initContent(this.doc,store.getValue(this.tiddler,this.field));

	var barElement=createTiddlyElement(null,"div",null,"easyEditorToolBar");
	this.wrapper.insertBefore(barElement,this.wrapper.firstChild);
	this.toolbar = new EditorToolbar(this.doc,barElement,this.editor);

	this.browser.plugEvents(this.doc,contextualCallback(this,this.scheduleButtonsRefresh));
	this.editor.focus();
}

easyEditor.SimplePreProcessoror = function(text) {
	var re = /^<html>(.*)<\/html>$/m;
	var htmlValue = re.exec(text);
	var value = (htmlValue && (htmlValue.length>0)) ? htmlValue[1] : text;
	return value;
}

easyEditor.prototype.scheduleButtonsRefresh=function() { //doesn't refresh buttons state when rough typing
	if (this.nextUpdate) window.clearTimeout(this.nextUpdate);
	this.nextUpdate = window.setTimeout(contextualCallback(this.toolbar,EditorToolbar.onUpdateButton),easyEditor.buttonDelay);
}

easyEditor.buttonDelay = 200;

// TOOLBAR CLASS

function EditorToolbar(target,parent,window){
	this.target = target;
	this.window=window;
	this.elements={};
	var row = createTiddlyElement(createTiddlyElement(createTiddlyElement(parent,"table"),"tbody"),"tr");
	var buttons = (config.options.txtEasyEditorButtons ? config.options.txtEasyEditorButtons : EditorToolbar.buttonsList).split(",");
	for(var cpt = 0; cpt < buttons.length; cpt++){
		var b = buttons[cpt];
		var button = EditorToolbar.buttons[b];
		if (button) {
			if (button.separator)
				createTiddlyElement(row,"td",null,"separator").innerHTML+="&nbsp;";
			else {
				var cell=createTiddlyElement(row,"td",null,b+"Button");
				if (button.onCreate) button.onCreate.call(this, cell, b);
				else EditorToolbar.createButton.call(this, cell, b);
			}
		}
	}
}

EditorToolbar.createButton = function(place,name){
	this.elements[name] = createTiddlyButton(place,EditorToolbar.buttons[name].label,EditorToolbar.buttons[name].toolTip,contextualCallback(this,EditorToolbar.onCommand(name)),"button");
}

EditorToolbar.onCommand = function(name){
	var button = EditorToolbar.buttons[name];
	return function(){
		var parameter = false;
		if (button.prompt) {
			var parameter = this.target.queryCommandValue(name);
			parameter = prompt(button.prompt,parameter);
		}
		if (parameter != null) {
			this.target.execCommand(name, false, parameter);
			EditorToolbar.onUpdateButton.call(this);
		}
		return false;
	}
}

EditorToolbar.getCommandState = function(target,name){
	try {return target.queryCommandState(name)}
	catch(e){return false}
}

EditorToolbar.onRefreshButton = function (name){
	if (EditorToolbar.getCommandState(this.target,name)) addClass(this.elements[name].parentNode,"buttonON");
	else removeClass(this.elements[name].parentNode,"buttonON");
	this.window.focus();
}

EditorToolbar.onUpdateButton = function(){
	for (b in this.elements) 
		if (EditorToolbar.buttons[b].onRefresh) EditorToolbar.buttons[b].onRefresh.call(this,b);
		else EditorToolbar.onRefreshButton.call(this,b);
}

EditorToolbar.buttons = {
	separator : {separator : true},
	bold : {label:"B", toolTip : "Bold"},
	italic : {label:"I", toolTip : "Italic"},
	underline : {label:"U", toolTip : "Underline"},
	strikethrough : {label:"S", toolTip : "Strikethrough"},
	insertunorderedlist : {label:"\u25CF", toolTip : "Unordered list"},
	insertorderedlist : {label:"1.", toolTip : "Ordered list"},
	justifyleft : {label:"[\u2261", toolTip : "Align left"},
	justifyright : {label:"\u2261]", toolTip : "Align right"},
	justifycenter : {label:"\u2261", toolTip : "Align center"},
	justifyfull : {label:"[\u2261]", toolTip : "Justify"},
	removeformat : {label:"\u00F8", toolTip : "Remove format"},
	fontsize : {label:"\u00B1", toolTip : "Set font size", prompt: "Enter font size"},
	forecolor : {label:"C", toolTip : "Set font color", prompt: "Enter font color"},
	fontname : {label:"F", toolTip : "Set font name", prompt: "Enter font name"},
	heading : {label:"H", toolTip : "Set heading level", prompt: "Enter heading level (example : h1, h2, ...)"},
	indent : {label:"\u2192[", toolTip : "Indent paragraph"},
	outdent : {label:"[\u2190", toolTip : "Outdent paragraph"},
	inserthorizontalrule : {label:"\u2014", toolTip : "Insert an horizontal rule"},
	insertimage : {label:"\u263C", toolTip : "Insert image", prompt: "Enter image url"}
}

EditorToolbar.buttonsList = "bold,italic,underline,strikethrough,separator,increasefontsize,decreasefontsize,fontsize,forecolor,fontname,separator,removeformat,separator,insertparagraph,insertunorderedlist,insertorderedlist,separator,justifyleft,justifyright,justifycenter,justifyfull,indent,outdent,separator,heading,separator,inserthorizontalrule,insertimage";

if (config.browser.isGecko) {
	EditorToolbar.buttons.increasefontsize = {onCreate : EditorToolbar.createButton, label:"A", toolTip : "Increase font size"};
	EditorToolbar.buttons.decreasefontsize = {onCreate : EditorToolbar.createButton, label:"A", toolTip : "Decrease font size"};
	EditorToolbar.buttons.insertparagraph = {label:"P", toolTip : "Format as paragraph"};
}

// GECKO (FIREFOX, ...) BROWSER SPECIFIC METHODS

geckoEditor.setupFrame = function(iframe,height,callback) {
	iframe.setAttribute("style","width: 100%; height:" + height);
	iframe.addEventListener("load",callback,true);
}

geckoEditor.plugEvents = function(doc,onchange){
	doc.addEventListener("keyup", onchange, true);
	doc.addEventListener("keydown", onchange, true);
	doc.addEventListener("click", onchange, true);
}

geckoEditor.postProcessor = function(text){return text};

geckoEditor.preProcessor = function(text){return easyEditor.SimplePreProcessoror(text)}

geckoEditor.isDocReady = function() {return true;}

geckoEditor.reloadOnDesignMode=false;

geckoEditor.initContent = function(doc,content){
	if (content) doc.execCommand("insertHTML",false,geckoEditor.preProcessor(content));
}

// INTERNET EXPLORER BROWSER SPECIFIC METHODS
	
IEeditor.setupFrame = function(iframe,height,callback) {
	iframe.width="99%";  //IE displays the iframe at the bottom if 100%. CSS layout problem ? I don't know. To be studied...
	iframe.height=height.toString();
	iframe.attachEvent("onreadystatechange",callback);
}

IEeditor.plugEvents = function(doc,onchange){
	doc.attachEvent("onkeyup", onchange);
	doc.attachEvent("onkeydown", onchange);
	doc.attachEvent("onclick", onchange);
}

IEeditor.isDocReady = function(doc){
	if (doc.readyState!="complete") return false;
	if (!doc.body) return false;
	return (doc && doc.getElementsByTagName && doc.getElementsByTagName("head") && doc.getElementsByTagName("head").length>0);
}

IEeditor.postProcessor = function(text){return text};

IEeditor.preProcessor = function(text){return easyEditor.SimplePreProcessoror(text)}

IEeditor.reloadOnDesignMode=true;

IEeditor.initContent = function(doc,content){
	if (content) doc.body.innerHTML=IEeditor.preProcessor(content);
}
	
function contextualCallback(obj,func){
    return function(){return func.call(obj)}
}
	
Story.prototype.previousGatherSaveEasyEdit = Story.prototype.previousGatherSaveEasyEdit ? Story.prototype.previousGatherSaveEasyEdit : Story.prototype.gatherSaveFields; // to avoid looping if this line is called several times
Story.prototype.gatherSaveFields = function(e,fields){
	if(e && e.getAttribute) {
		var f = e.getAttribute("easyEdit");
		if(f){
			var newVal = config.macros.easyEdit.gather(e);
			if (newVal) fields[f] = newVal;
		}
		this.previousGatherSaveEasyEdit(e, fields);
	}
}

config.commands.easyEdit={
	text: "write",
	tooltip: "Edit this tiddler in wysiwyg mode",
	readOnlyText: "view",
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If your family income is $35 478 or less

If your family income is $35 478 or less you may be able to get the maximum rate of Child Care Benefit for approved care.

Table 1:
Maximum rate for non-school child Number of children in care 	Per week (for 50 hours of care) 	Per hour for each child
1 	$168.50 	$3.37
2 	$352.17 ($176.08 per child) 	$3.52
3 	$549.63 ($183.21 per child) 	$3.66

Maximum rate for a school child is 85 per cent of the maximum non-school child rate.

Source: [[Family Assistance Office : If your family income is $35 478 or less|http://www.familyassist.gov.au/internet/fao/fao1.nsf/content/payments-ccb-how_much-less_32485.htm]]
Home > What are the payments? > Child Care Benefit > How much can I get?
If your family income is more than $35 478

If your family's adjusted taxable income is in the income range shown in Table 2, you can get a part rate of Child Care Benefit. The part rate is worked out using your Child Care Benefit percentage.

Child Care Benefit Percentage
We work out your Child Care Benefit percentage from information you give us about:

    * your family's estimated annual income; and
    * the number of children you have in care. 

The Child Care Benefit percentage decreases as a families income increases. For a personal assessment contact us.

Table 2:
Income limit beyond which only the minimum rate of Child Care Benefit is paid Number of Children in care 	Yearly family income
1 	$108 434
2 	$115 900
3 	$131 570
add $23 031 for each extra child in care


If your family's income is higher than the amounts in Table 2, you will only be eligible for the minimum rate of Child Care Benefit.

Source: [[Family Assistance Office : If your family income is more than $35 478|http://www.familyassist.gov.au/internet/fao/fao1.nsf/content/payments-ccb-how_much-more_32485.htm]]
<html><div style="text-align: center;">..<iframe src="http://www.flickr.com/slideShow/index.gne?set_id=72157604048366098&amp;" align="middle" frameborder="0" height="500" scrolling="no" width="500"></iframe>..<br><br><br><br></div></html>
Fed rescue of Bear Stearns raises specter of Depression-era crash
By Barry Grey
15 March 2008

Use this version to print | Send this link by email | Email the author

The Federal Reserve Board on Friday took emergency action to prevent the collapse of Bear Stearns, the fifth largest US investment bank and one of the world’s largest finance and brokerage houses.

Invoking a little-used provision added to the Federal Reserve Act in 1932, at the height of the Great Depression, the US central bank agreed to allow the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to insure an infusion of credit to Bear Stearns by JP Morgan Chase. Under the terms of the “secured loan facility,” to extend for up to 28 days, the risk of a default by Bear Stearns will be borne by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, not JP Morgan Chase. The latter will serve essentially as a conduit for the cash provided by the US central bank.

This mechanism was used because only commercial banks, so-called depository institutions, can borrow directly from the Fed’s discount window. Bear Stearns is not a depository bank, and hence the Fed was obliged to invoke a provision of the 1932 amendment to the Federal Reserve Act that applies when “unusual and exigent circumstances exist and the borrower is unable to secure adequate credit accommodations from other sources.”

The announcement of the Fed bailout sent shivers through Wall Street and shook financial markets around the world. It confirmed rumors that had been mounting over the past week that Bear Stearns, the second largest US underwriter of mortgage bonds, did not have the cash to meet claims by its creditors. The rescue operation came one day after the collapse of Carlyle Capital Corporation, a $22 billion publicly traded investment fund controlled by the Carlyle Group, long one of the most profitable and well-connected private equity firms in the US.

With the de facto collapse of Bear Stearns, however, the housing and credit market collapse has claimed one of the titans of Wall Street. Founded in 1923 and employing some 15,500 people worldwide, Bear Stearns was one of the “big five” Wall Street investment banks. In 2005-2007, Bear Stearns was recognized as the “Most Admired” securities firm in Fortune magazine’s “America’s Most Admired Companies” survey.

Last July, the collapse of two Bear Stearns hedge funds as a result of the bursting of the US housing bubble sparked a crisis of confidence in the credit system that has gathered steam and expanded in scope to threaten the viability of some of the biggest banks and financial institutions in the world. The worsening credit crunch has deepened the crisis in the housing market and the economy in general, plunging the US into a recession and wreaking havoc with the economies of Europe and Japan.

The news of the bailout sent share prices tumbling on Wall Street. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 194.65 points, a drop of 1.6 percent. The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index fared even worse, giving up 27.34 points (2.1 percent), while the Nasdaq Composite Index fell 51.12 points, or 2.3 percent.

Nine stocks fell for every one that rose, and the fears that other financial houses could follow Bear’s demise was reflected in a 4.1 percent fall in the Standard & Poor’s Financial Index. All 92 members of the index lost ground during the trading day.

Bear Stearns stock plunged $27, or 47 percent, to end the day at $30. Coming on the heels of a months-long slide in the bank’s stock price, yesterday’s panic sell-off reduced Bear Stearns’s market valuation to $4.1 billion, less than one-fifth the size of Lehman Brothers.

Indicative of the broader reverberations from the Bear Stearns collapse, the share price of Ambac Financial Group, the world’s second-largest bond insurer, fell 93 percent, on widespread fears that the company will not have sufficient capital to meet claims from its creditors.

The US dollar hit new lows against the euro and other currencies.

The Fed action on Friday confirmed speculation that its extraordinary announcement three days earlier that it would loan $200 billion in Treasury bonds to investment banks and brokerages and accept as collateral privately issued mortgage-backed securities—whose market value has plummeted—was a desperation measure aimed at forestalling the failure of a major Wall Street finance house.

Speaking of Friday’s Fed rescue operations, the Wall Street Journal Online wrote: “The timing of the move made its urgency clear: If Bear could have held out until March 27, it could have borrowed directly from the Fed itself under a new program announced just Tuesday.”

The maximum size of the loan is not predetermined, but is limited by how much collateral Bear Stearns can provide to satisfy the Fed’s requirements, officials said. The loan by no means assures Bear Stearns’s survival. More likely, it was granted in the hope that it would buy time for a more orderly disposition of the firm’s fate and head off a panic response by bankers and investors to its demise.

As the Wall Street Journal Online noted, “The developments could mean the end of independence for Bear, founded in 1923. JP Morgan said it is ‘working closely with Bear Stearns on securing permanent financing or other alternatives for the company’—Wall Street lingo for a sale of other strategic-level change—and CNBC reported that the bank is ‘actively being shopped’ to potential buyers.”

Officials at Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s Investor Services met Friday to discuss whether to downgrade Bear Stearns’s credit rating, and if so, by how much.

In its own statement on the bailout, Bear Stearns said, “The company can make no assurance that any strategic alternatives will be successfully completed.”

Carl Lantz, a strategist at Credit Suisse, said the intervention by the New York Fed and JP Morgan showed that Bear “didn’t have enough money to turn the light on this morning.”

Geoffrey Yu of UBS said, “I don’t think the market has seen anything of this magnitude before, such a big bank.”

Wall Street Journal columnist Peter A. McKay wrote: “For investors, the arrival of the Federal Reserve and JP Morgan Chase with a financial life raft for troubled Bear Stearns served primarily as a reminder of how murky and deep the waters of Wall Street’s credit crisis remain, with other market participants possibly drowning below the surface.”

The immediate fear motivating the Federal Reserve, the Treasury Department and Wall Street banks was the danger that an uncontrolled collapse of Bear Stearns would have a domino effect on already turbulent financial markets. Were Bear Stearns forced to sell off assets at fire-sale prices to raise cash needed to meet creditors’ demands, the value of untold billions in assets held by other financial institutions would drop, leading to more margin calls from creditors, further institutional collapses, more panic selling of debt and securities—a vicious spiral to the bottom with the potential of a breakdown in the entire capitalist financial system.

The temporary reprieve for Bear Stearns does not eliminate the potential for just such a scenario in the near future.

The underlying problem is the vast credit bubble that was inflated on the basis of reckless and intrinsically unviable home loans and other forms of speculation, including leveraged buyouts and a vast expansion in unregulated credit markets that delivered unsustainably high returns on investment. The immense fortunes amassed by the uppermost echelons of the US population on the basis of such parasitic financial operations have created, as their consequence, a social and economic disaster of historical proportions, threatening tens of millions of Americans, and hundreds of millions more people around the world, with pauperization.

President Bush, perhaps the consummate political personification of the social layer that benefited from the now-imploded speculative bubble, spoke Friday before the Economic Club of New York, only hours after the rescue of Bear Stearns had been announced. Moving from platitude to platitude, he declared the US economy “the envy of the world,” referred to the financial crisis as a “rough patch,” and reassured his audience that “in a free market, there’s going to be good times and bad times. That’s how markets work.”

The only substance of his remarks was opposition to any resurrection of government regulation of the banks, denunciation of proposals, such as the timid half-measures being advanced by congressional Democrats, to contain the growing wave of home foreclosures, and a restatement of the demand that his tax cuts for the wealthy be made permanent.

His speech did nothing to reassure the financial markets, which are too mired in crisis to buy into the fool’s paradise “optimism” of the commander in chief. Martin Feldstein, a conservative Republican who served for a time as Ronald Reagan’s chief economic adviser, summed up the growing sentiment in a speech to a conference in Florida. “I believe,” he said, “the US economy is now in recession. The situation is bad, it’s getting worse and the risks are that the situation could be very bad.”

See Also:
Gold and oil prices soar, dollar slumps, Carlyle Group fund collapses
[14 March 2008]
US Federal Reserve injects $200 billion into credit markets to avert financial meltdown
[13 March 2008]

Source: [[Fed rescue of Bear Stearns raises specter of Depression-era crash|http://www.wsws.org/articles/2008/mar2008/bear-m15.shtml]]
Get your fix today?

Wednesday: Plenty of new stuff today.............

Welcome new Gallery sponsor Condor Cycles from London with eight (yes 8) distinctly different fixedgear/track bikes. Thanks for your support Condor.

Next up is the information page for our coverage of the 2008 Track World Championships from Manchester, UK that starts next week. Get yourself acquainted with the different events HERE.

Tuesday: The 7th Chapter of Bob's Garage is up for today.

Sunday's Hot News: Results for the Handmade Show voting are HERE

Weekend: Up for your weekend enjoyment is a review of the new 1,150 cu in Banjo Bros. Messenger Bag

AND.....our apologies for somehow missing them at the HandMade Show...Conor Buescher and Garrett Clark of Vendetta Cycles from Corvallis, Oregon ....See their work HERE.

Friday: Up today is a great interview of Rich Craig from ProWheelBuilder.com that was done by our Staff Writer, Bill Palladino just a couple weeks ago. Get it here

Monday: Handmade Show Contest !
We know that most of you didn't get to go to the Handmade Bike Show in Portland earlier this month, and we wanted our coverage to be as close as possible to you being there. Then we thought: "The builders got to vote, the people who went to the show got to vote, so how about our viewers too?"
So have fun and VOTE HERE.

Friday's Lotsa News: We've received our UCI Press Accreditation and we'll be providing some exclusive coverage from the World Track Championships in Manchester, UK at the end of this month. For many of you who have only a limited exposure to professional track racing our goal is to give you an inside view of the competitors, the various events, and of course, the bicycles. Stay tuned, we'll be getting you up to speed during the rest of the month.

We're almost done with our coverage of the Handmade Bike Show, just a couple more builders to feature - but pay attention on Monday, we've got something special brewed up.

Lastly: Many of you know that my biggest cycling event of the year is the National 24Hr Challenge in the middle of June - I've done it 11 or 12 years now, and 2008 is gonna see me riding with a vengence to see if I can't get that elusive 350 miles.
BUT, we also want to get you some coverage of the World Cycle Messenger Championships from Toronto and they are the same weekend.... so we're looking for someone to act as a correspondent for us. Low pay, big badge, that sort of thing. Let me know.

Tuesday: Up today is our review, by Staff Writer Marsha Ungluisri of some women's spring cycle clothing Endura Cyclewear - Knickers, Jacket & Top Baselayer

. click above to see the show

Pick your favorites...... VOTE HERE.
Weekend....Vendetta Cycles.
Added last week:Naked, VelocityUSA, Ritchey Components, Kirk Frameworks, Courage Cycles, Yipsan Bicycles, Keith Anderson Cycles, Paul Components, Independent Fab, Strong Frames, Selle An-Atomica, Roark, Cicli Polito, Llewellyn Cycles, Pegoretti, Co-Motion, Rich Adams, Pass & Stow, DeSalvo, Vanilla, Rene Herse, Ground Up Designs, Nobilette Cycles, Zullo Bici, Orlieb-Tubus, Land Shark Cycles, Don Walker Cycles, Hufnagel Bicycles, Cloud Nine, Arantix, Bilenky Cycle Works, Proletariat Bicycles, Luna Cycles, Renovo Hardwood Bicycles, Paragon Machine Works, Villin Cycle Works, Wheel Fanatyk, Chris King, King Cage, Frances Cycles, Broakland, Sadilah, Ahearne Cycles, SyCip Design, Steve Rex, ANT, Soulcraft, Rue Sports, Litton Cycles, Retrotec, Townsend Cycles, 333 Fab, Calfee Design, Cane Creek Cycling Components, Rebolledo Cycles, Brooks, Brian Baylis, Phil Wood & Co. and Grognard Bicycles.

Interbike 2007 Coverage. Everything you'd want to see.

Submit your photos HERE.

Put your marque in the message bar and tell us where you live. Typically your page will appear in 6-8 days. scott@mittenwine.com

This gallery is supported through your generous donations.




Chapter 6 is now up .. Chapter 7 coming Mar 10th.

March Review Endura Cyclewear
February Review Blaze SuperFlash LED Headlight. Nice.
January Review Axiom Streamliner Rear Rack
December Review Don Walker Frameset
November Review Alien Bike's Crankset
November Review Alien Bike's Wheelset
October Review Planetbike Blaze & Superflash
October Review Planetbike Red Zeppelin
October Review 2008 Schwinn Madison
September Review NYCBikes: Dorothy 3
September Review Milwaukee Cream City
August Review Clemente Guard
July Review Portland Knickers
July Review Crumpler Messenger Backpack
July Review IRO Jamie Roy & Angus
June Review HotVeloCiti Jersey
June Review Loeka Shorts and Top
June Review Endura Zyme Shorts
May Review Chrome Backbone Backpack
May Review Knog Bullfrog LED Tail Light
May Review Soma Noah's Arc Handlebar
May Review Maxxis Courcheval Tires.
April Review - BLT Firewire & Ozone LED Lights
April Interview - Johnny Coast
April Review - Banjo Bros Commuter BackPack
April Review - 13 Different Pedals/Clips/Straps
April Review - Ortlieb Messenger BackPack
April Review - '07 Schwinn Madison
March Review - Shain BK100 helmet
March Review - Surly CrossCheck
February Review - eMotion Rollers
February Review - EAI Bareknuckle
January Review - Three Hip Bags
January Review - EAI Pro SuperTool

>>>> More Reviews

Riding Fixed Off-Road. by Jesse Ratzkin - How he did it.
Converting a Surly MTB Disc Front Hub by Will Williamson
Altoid Toolbox By Dennis Bean-Larson
Fixed From Old Freehub By Jussi Panula
Alita's bike One year after the 2005 Symposium. Just keeping it going. By Dennis Bean-Larson
Converting an Sram P5 Hub
Three speed fixed gear. By Graham Webster
Gear Inch Calculator
Know teeth, want gear? Calculate your gear/inch. Thanks Steve
Cadence Calculator
Know speed, gear? Calculate your cadence. Thanks Steve
Wheelbuilding with Arup Sen
Tips, ideas, and help for building wheels
Remove Anodizing & Polish Some Parts
High polish is pretty easy - dennis
Disc Hub Conversion
MTB front disc hub to rear fg hub - Tom Chow
Diamond Handlebar Wrap
by fixedrider
Making a rechargable water bottle battery
by Steve Ruane

>>>> More Tech Articles


Art Series & Vintage Photos.
Thanks to everyone who sent in these images.
24 Hours of Fixed Gear Gallery Forum.
Thanks All.
Seen In Amsterdam
Thanks Martin
Only in Russia
From Jammy
Newspaper article by Jeff is here
Fixed Gear Bikes at Paris-Brest-Paris
Photos from Thien Tran.
3Rensho Catalogue (pdf format)
from Julie Eisenhardt.
Skills Only Found In China
Only from Evan Marks
Sept, 2005 LA Times Article about FG Bikes
By John Balzar
A NYC Century
from Danny Eagle.
Photos from San Francisco
by Sam Campbell.
Square Wheels ?
Sent in by Bill Smith.
Kevin Heyse's Dream
100% digital.
SkiBike
by Matt and Nils.
Hey, we built a Kangaroo bike!
by Chip Haynes.
More Detroit
by Lynn Forrest & Scott Berthel.
AZ Fixed Ol' Farts (Dry Heat Fixies)
From Craig Montgomery.

>>>> More Photo Stories

Website Facts.......
We currently have over 6,200 individual webpages displaying over 55,000 photos. A typical month has viewers from 100 countries viewing 3.5 million pages.


Search for your marque:
Thanks to Orion Buckminster Montoya

Search for any word, any page here.
Hint: Try something like mixte.

Powered by FreeFind Thanks to Patrick Larson

Non-Profit Links

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Stolen Bike Registry

Gallery Information

Submit your photos HERE.

Please check your image sizes before sending, to make sure they are not sideways my processor doesn't rotate them. Also bear in mind that I have a backlog of about 1 week right now. Your bike should appear in 6-8 days - and tell us where you live and what the marque your bike is, ok?


Regular email for advertising inquiries and other communication is: fixedgearwizard@yahoo.com

"SingleMinded", "Fixit", and "A Fixed Gear Gallery" copyright 2003 by Dennis and Katy Bean-Larson.
Fixed Gear Bike Logo copyright 2000 by Dennis & Katy Bean-Larson

Mailing address is:
The Fixed Gear Gallery, 1200 West 11th Street, #215, Traverse City, Michigan 49684, phone: 231-342-1546, fax is 231-941-7400 .
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your wednesday fix
7,036 Seen in NYC 3/08
7,035 ?'s Earl Henry 3/08
7,034 Lauren's Specialized 3/08
7,033 Jason Cook's Shogun 3/08
7,032 England's Monkey Wards 3/08
7,031 Joe Pesci's Schwinn 3/08
7,030 Byron Davy's Avanti 3/08
7,029 Rich McQuail's Mercier 3/08
7,028 Jason Arnold's Motobecane 3/08

Art Series

your tuesday fix
7,027 Alex Wirth;s Peugeot 3/08
7,026 Aaron Dougal's Lou Tondu 3/08
7,025 Ken Giesbrecht's IRO 3/08
7,024 Justine's Fuji 3/08
7,023 Max's Leader 3/08
7,022 Perry Finley's Vista 3/08
7,021 Tech's Maruishi 3/08
7,020 Alex VanSickle's Dolan 3/08
7,019 Darryl Bailey's Steyr 3/08
7,018 Alex Plommer's Diamond Back 3/08

your monday fix
7,017 Phil DeCoy's Fuji 3/08
7,016 John Madcharo's Rossin 3/08
7,015 Justin's Trek 3/08
7,014 Dietmar Wachtmann's Kona 3/08
7,013 Kyle Davidson's American 3/08
7,012 Sammy's Vifian 3/08

your friday fix
7,011 Jack Banner's Dolan 3/08
7,010 Tech's Maruishi 3/08
7,009 Jason Borden's Trek 3/08
7,008 Jean-Francois Paquin's Energy 3/08
7,007 Andrew Powers' Tunturi 3/08
7,006 Brian Lindsay's Schwinn 3/08
7,005 Thomas Magee's Olmo 3/08
7,004 Jarrod Moore's Giant 3/08

Art Series [+] [+]

your thursday fix
7,003 Petr's Kona 3/08
7,002 Kirk Bassingthwaighte's Sparton 3/08
7,001 Mark's Fetish 3/08
7,000 Jeff Frane's Capricorn 3/08
6,999 Brian Harris' Centurion 3/08
6,998 John Baybay's Basso 3/08
6,997 Luke Ngakane's Thorn 3/08
6,996 Tim Holsgrove's Claud Butler 3/08

Around the World with Annie
3282 Ryan Matheson's Motobecane
2825 Jim Fietz' Raleigh
515 James Egolf's Raleigh

your wednesday fix
6,995 David Sosna's Raleigh 3/08
6,994 Mark Pimentel's Schwinn 3/08
6,993 Mat Baker's Wilier 3/08
6,992 Jon Fisher's Peugeot 3/08
6,991 Cab's Raleigh 3/08
6,990 Sam Worley's Bianchi 3/08
6,989 Sam Worley's GT 3/08
6,988 Sam Worley's Fetish 3/08

Art Series [+] [+]

your tuesday fix
6,987 Qua's Schwinn 3/08 V
6,986 Jacob Rønfeldt's Fort 3/08
6,985 Mitch's Erba 3/08
6,984 Akasha Barickman's Pake 3/08
6,983 Dave Schenker's Peugeot 3/08
6,982 Seen in Portland 3/08
6,981 Seen in Traverse City 3/08
6,980 Seen in Boise 3/08
6,979 Jonathan Kaplan's GT 3/08
6,978 Nate's Austro-Daimler 3/08

your monday fix
6,977 Tolman's Nishiki 3/08
6,976 Mark Noad's JC Higgins 3/08
6,975 Phil Lalemant's Reynolds 3/08
6,974 Brian Garner's Schwinn 3/08
6,973 Dan C's Trek 3/08
6,972 Dan Michau's Motobecane 3/08
6,971 Scully's ? 3/08
6,970 Ian Nigh's Own 3/08
6,969 Ryan Seward's Scattante 3/08
6,968 Karl Hall's tish 3/08
6,967 Sina's KHS 3/08

your friday fix
6,966 Franklyn Wu's On-One 3/08
6,965 John Williams' ? 3/08
6,964 Lawrence Mendiola's Caballo 3/08
6,963 EA's Malvern Star 3/08 V
6,962 Dustin Cocco's GT 3/08
6,961 Gregory Gallardo's Milwaukee 3/08
6,960 Becca Sheade's Trek 3/08
6,959 Chad Wilkes' Shogun 3/08
6,958 Leon Webster's Raleigh 3/08
6,957 Adam Karch's Schwinn 3/08

your thursday fix
6,956 Erica Frumin's Nishiki 3/08
6,955 Mark Boyce's Corrado 3/08
6,954 Sean Erickson's ? 3/08
6,953 ?'s Giant 3/08
6,952 Jeremy Bidwell's Raleigh 3/08
6,951 Javier Jurado's Fuji 3/08
6,950 Alex's Takhion 3/08
6,948 Mauro Valenti's Inmeno 3/08
6,948 Marcelo Rodrigues's Cannondale 3/08
6,947 Christopher Lighthall's Uni 3/08

Around the World with Annie
2939 Nick Hendrix' Miyata
2614 Eddie Miller's Gitane
2112 Evan's Denti

your wednesday fix
6,946 Mike's Specialized 3/08
6,945 Wyles Vance's Motobecane 3/08
6,944 David R's Miyata 3/08
6,943 Kitty Crossbones' Schwinn 3/08
6,942 Steve Srubas' Carlton 3/08
6,941 Kitty Crossbones' Peugeot 3/08
6,940 Jason Gardner's Schwinn 3/08
6,939 Brooklyn's 3Rensho 3/08
6,938 Chris Danz' Caribou 3/08
6,937 Miranda Anderson's Nishiki 3/08
6,936 Stefano Taricani's ? 3/08
6,935 Micke Keysendal's Nishiki 3/08

your tuesday fix
6,934 Jason Moore's Milwaukee 3/08
6,932 Chris Buerkle's Austro-Daimler 3/08
6,931 Danny Wainright's Bianchi 3/08
6,930 Kurt Docksey's Claud Butler 3/08 V
6,929 Brandon Lee's Giant 3/08
6,928 Spencer Hanley's Bianchi 3/08
6,927 Cale Hendricks' Cannondale 3/08
6,926 Michal Pochopien's Orowski 3/08
6,925 Tim's Kona 3/08
6,924 Tom Bentley's Apollo 3/08
6,923 ?'s Mercier 3/08
6,922 Trevor Emond's Batavus 3/08

your monday fix
6,921 Ian Summers' Trek 3/08
6,920 Carl Harris' Ep-X 3/08
6,919 Liv Mershon's Fuji 3/08
6,918 Mike's Armstrong 3/08
6,917 Mike's Griffen 3/08
6,916 Andy Phenix' Schwinn 3/08
6,915 Patrick Cohen's Windsor 3/08
6,914 Graham's IRO 3/08
6,913 XC's Schwinn 3/08
6,912 Devin's Nishiki 3/08
6,911 Peyton's Trek 3/08

Weekend Update

your friday fix
6,910 Kirk Bassingthwaighte's BrassKnuckle 2/08
6,909 Benjamin Petersen's hwinn 2/08
6,908 Matt Morgan's Raleigh 2/08
6,907 Stephen Frisby's Pearson 2/08
6,906 Matt Talley's Raleigh 2/08
6,905 Daniel Helms' ? 2/08
6,904 H Heiliger's Cilo 2/08
6,903 Seen in Colombia 2/08
6,902 Michael Benner's Masi 2/08
6,901 Aimar Angitia's Amaro 2/08
6,900 Chad Hulbert's IRO 2/08
6,899 Linus Owen-Garni's Eisentraut 2/08
6,898 Adrian Fine's Univega 2/08
6,897 Marshall Battani's chwinn 2/08

Vintage Series [+] [+]

your thursday fix
6,896 Richard Barnwall's Affinity 2/08
6,895 Dave Farkas' Peugeot 2/08
6,894 Jop Wielens's Dolan 2/08
6,893 Gino Estacio's ? 2/08
6,892 Simon Lee's Specialized 2/08
6,891 Paolo Sanguankeo's Surly 2/08
6,890 Ives Harz' Eastgerman 2/08
6,889 John Lillies' Specialized 2/08
6,888 Brandon's Schwinn 2/08
6,887 Aaron Last's Avanti 2/08
6,886 Sam Shapiro's Raleigh 2/08
6,885 Dan Mitchell's Catamount 2/08
6,884 Jason Schultz's Free Spirit 2/08

Around the World with Annie
2103 Eric Norris' Quickbeam
2058 Chris Kostman's Woodrup
1587 Greg Snyder's Schwinn

your wednesday fix
6,883 Tim Osborne's Shorter 2/08
6,882 Heidi's Schwinn 2/08
6,881 Mike's Joe Waugh 2/08
6,880 Paul Teather's Cleveland 2/08
6,879 Paul Sherwood's Vetta 2/08
6,878 James Tomasino's Motobecane 2/08
6,877 Luke Edwards's Jamis 2/08
6,876 Richard Craig's Litespeed 2/08
6,875 Don Butt's ? 2/08
6,874 Robbert vanOverdijk's Gitane 2/08
6,874 Michael Baker's Centurion 2/08
6,873 Aaron Cole's Peugeot 2/08

Art Series [+] [+]

your tuesday fix
6,872 Bill Crowe's Soma 2/08
6,871 Jackie-Rae's Stinsmen 2/08
6,870 Tim Stratz' Pake 2/08
6,869 Bryan Jones' Mercier 2/08
6,868 Greg Oyler's Mercier 2/08
6,867 Rudolph Luciani's Surly 2/08
6,866 Tim Heyes' Kona 2/08
6,865 Zackery Stover's Somec 2/08
6,864 Lim's Surly 2/08
6,863 Jeffrey Carter's Independent Fab 2/08

your monday fix
6,862 James B.Lee's KHS 2/08
6,861 Nick Olson's ? 2/08
6,860 Dan Watkins' Nishiki 2/08
6,859 Chris Blazer's Giant 2/08
6,858 Dan Swick's KHS 2/08
6,857 Mike Smith's Peugeot 2/08
6,856 Miguel Garay's Panasonic 2/08
6,855 Christopher Totten's Schwinn 2/08
6,854 Ethan Furniss' Surly 2/08
6,853 Jeff Anderson's Kona 2/08
6,852 Jacob Rønfeldt's Stowe 2/08

Weekend Update

your friday fix
6,851 Raliegh's Raleigh 2/08
6,850 Dominic's Serotta 2/08
6,849 Tim Dine's Fondriest 2/08
6,848 Richie Andrew's Fuji 2/08
6,847 Conrad Cunningham's Peugeot 2/08
6,846 Lou Larsen's Fuji 2/08
6,845 Eddie Martinez' Leader 2/08
6,844 Alex Herman's Fuji 2/08
6,843 Mike Cola's Repco 2/08

Art Series [+]

your thursday fix
6,842 Katie's Pake 2/08
6,841 Jean-Simon Charland's IRO 2/08
6,840 Noel Paz' Bianchi 2/08
6,839 Gerard Gueco's ? 2/08
6,838 Todd Brookhiser's Trek 2/08
6,837 Keene Kopper's IRO 2/08
6,836 Matt Bryson's Geoff Clark 2/08
6,835 Ian Mortimer's ? 2/08
6,834 Bob Goodman's GT 2/08
6,833 Peter Hyde's Independent Fab 2/08
6,832 Tom Yersak's Own 2/08

Around the World with Annie
6551 Sam Guttman's Bob Jackson
6170 Tom Sharp's Bob Jackson
588 Jeff Odland's Waterford

your wednesday fix
6,830-31 Jeff Palmer's Two 2/08
6,829 Seen in London 2/08
6,828 Lance Morgan's Gary Fisher 2/08
6,827 Thyna Mao's Cannondale 2/08
6,826 D. Warden's Nishiki 2/08
6,825 Joshua's Gitane 2/08
6,824 ?'s Mazzotti 2/08
6,823 Kamil's Peugeot 2/08
6,822 Travis Guidry's Raleigh 2/08

Art Series [+]

your tuesday fix
6,821 Roger's Trek 2/08
6,820 J. Powers' Univega 2/08
6,819 Zac Fleckner's Surly 2/08
6,818 Jonathan Gentle's Charge 2/08
6,817 Seen 2/08
6,816 Jade OConnor's Moser 2/08
6,815 Michael Goeden's NYCBike 2/08
6,814 Brian Sain's Fuji 2/08
6,813 Michael Benton's Gean 2/08

your monday fix
6,812 James Jin's IRO 2/08
6,811 Eric Reeves' Astra 2/08
6,810 Raffaele Bonadio's Chesini 2/08
6,809 Nick Ledeboer's Fuji 2/08
6,808 Jag's Schwinn 2/08
6,807 Mike Krutel's Panasonic 2/08
6,806 Ethan Faber's Schwinn 2/08
6,805 Coleman Morris-Goodrick's Motobecane 2/08

Weekend Update [+]

your friday fix
6,804 Thomas Fanghaenel's Cannondale 2/08
6,803 Mark Tatum's Raleigh 2/08
6,802 Thomas Richter's Patria 2/08
6,801 Renato Losio's ? 2/08
6,800 Eric Wang's Schwinn 2/08
6,799 Tori Wentworth's Bridgestone 2/08
6,798 ?'s Giant 2/08
6,797 Alex Herman's Fuji 2/08
6,796 Chris Rothery's Panasonic 2/08
6,795 Chris Carter's Raleigh 2/08
6,794 Christopher Ibarra's SE 2/08

your thursday fix
6,793 Ron Moon's Schwinn 2/08
6,792 Tjalling's Shogun 2/08
6,791 Ian Nigh's IRO 2/08
6,790 Rick Fox's Mirella 2/08
6,789 Tim Gray's Yamaguchi 2/08
6,788 Richie Andrew's Fuji 2/08

Around the World with Annie
3393 Stuart Thomas's Sweetman
2969 Christopher Wright's Schwinn
2371 Ed Foster's Soma

your wednesday fix
6,787 Simon Andrews' ? 2/08
6,786 Nino's Faggin 2/08
6,785 Kevan's Cannondale 2/08
6,784 Kevan's Motobecane 2/08
6,783 Louis Radie's Surly 2/08
6,782 Al Morales' Peugeot 2/08
6,781 James Mason's 3Rensho 2/08

Art Series [+]

your tuesday fix
6,780 Brad Goodwin's Nishiki 2/08
6,779 Sergio's Bareknuckle 2/08
6,778 Lukas Beckmann's Markenrad 2/08 V
6,777 Mark Smith's Charge 2/08
6,776 Joe Petrick's Raleigh 2/08
6,775 Paul Langway's Schwinn 2/08
6,774 Buddy's Schwinn 2/08

your monday fix
6,773 Alex Lietzan's Schwinn 2/08
6,772 Guy Kelso's Pake 2/08
6,771 Simon's ? 2/08
6,770 Kensuke Arai's 2/08
6,769 Gianluca Pizzinga's ? 2/08
6,768 Mark Alexander's On-One 2/08
6,767 Isaac Enloe's Univega 2/08
6,766 Chris Wong's Bridgestone 2/08
6,765 Tim Smith's KHS 2/08

Weekend Update [+]

your friday fix
6,764 Golab's Gianni Motta 2/08
6,763 Richarda Brassard's Eddy Merckx 2/08
6,762 James Carver's ? 2/08
6,761 Mike Tobin's Condor 2/08
6,760 Niko Stumpo's Bianchi 2/08
6,759 Sean Lawrence's Vivalo 2/08
6,758 Justin Pruitt's IRO 2/08

your thursday fix
6,757 Robert Bland's Raleigh 2/08
6,756 MC's IRO 2/08
6,755 Dominique Partin's Veloce 2/08
6,754 Gareth Parry's ? 2/08
6,753 Ashton's LeveL 2/08
6,752 Carl Gumeson's Nishiki 2/08
6,751 James OToole's IRO 2/08
6,750 Brian Bostwick's Benotto 2/08

Around the World with Annie
2324 Sheldon Brown's Gunnar
27 Sheldon Brown's Piccio FG Tandem

your wednesday fix
6,749 Peter Hepp's Cannondale 2/08
6,748 Jacob Vos' Raleigh 2/08
6,747 Dustin Urizar's Peugeot 2/08
6,746 Lorenzo Lazzari's Atala 2/08
6,745 Ralph Symbleme's Tribune 2/08
6,744 Luca Urbani's De Visini 2/08
6,743 Sambaus' Corbetta 2/08
6,742 Tim Wilkey's Charge 2/08

Art Series [+]

your tuesday fix
6,741 Raphael Bartke's Fixie Inc 2/08
6,740 Tony Patnode's Fuji 2/08
6,739 Jasper Schriber's Soma 2/08
6,738 Alex Slaughter's KHS 2/08
6,737 Richard Edwards' Cannondale 2/08
6,736 ?'s Ausrtro-Daimler 2/08
6,735 David Baddley's BMC 2/08
6,734 Keith Young's Own 2/08

your monday fix
6,733 Margo Conover's Luna 2/08
6,732 Zach Kingsland's Panasonic 2/08
6,731 Sam Cordes' Motobecane 2/08
6,730 Ju's Peugeot 2/08
6,729 Dan Bunnskog's Motobecane 2/08
6,728 CR Walton's Sentinel 2/08
6,727 Frank Parrish's Pinarello 2/08
6,726 Thomas Sharpe's Bob Jackson 2/08
6,725 Bill Zimmerman's Atala 2/08
6,724 Paul Boalsburg's GT 2/08

Weekend Update

your friday fix
6,723 Steven Turner's Schwinn 1/08
6,722 Seen in Tel Aviv 1/08
6,721 Andrew Rockman's Sunbeam 1/08
6,720 Joe Petersen's Soma 1/08
6,719 Jake Morris's Specialized 1/08
6,718 Tony Goodwin's KHS 1/08
6,717 Jim Clark's Soma 1/08

your thursday fix
6,716 Andrew Wagerer's nesis 1/08
6,715 Haydn Paynter's KHS 1/08
6,714 Spiet's ? 1/08
6,713 Scott Vakos' Windseo 1/08
6,712 Tex's 3Rensho 1/08
6,711 Brad Parker's Schwinn 1/08
6,710 Michael Davis-Yates's Pro Cyclery 1/08
6,709 Ethan Cochran's ? 1/08
6,708 Marlin's Gary Fisher 1/08

Around the World with Annie
2260 Steven's Ciocc
2069 Fabian Falconett's Ciocc
1500 Garret Chow's Ciocc

your wednesday fix
6,707 Oliver Russell's On-One 1/08
6,706 Daniel Frankenfield's Miyata 1/08
6,705 Casey McClure's Peugeot 1/08
6,704 Thyna Mao's Benotto 1/08
6,703 Thyna Mao's Pake 1/08
6,702 Michael Young's Schwinn 1/08
6,701 Mr. Jenkins's Schwinn 1/08
6,700 Arvinder Mangat's Lemond 1/08

your tuesday fix
6,699 Ira Stevenson's Specialized 1/08
6,698 Liz Trenholme's Mercier 1/08
6,697 Carl McDonald's Peugeot 1/08
6,696 Trevor Anderson's Schwinn 1/08
6,695 Erik Batson's Schwinn 1/08
6,694 Seen in Portland 1/08
6,693 Mark Mangio's Specialized 1/08
6,692 Austin M's Specialized 1/08

your monday fix
6,691 Bob Delaney's IRO 1/08
6,690 J. Loewinsohn's Motobecane 1/08
6,689 Andrew Brose's Schwinn 1/08
6,688 Andy Wills' Alf Webb 1/08
6,687 Michael Hammond's Devo 1/08
6,686 Bob Deihl's Austro-Daimler 1/08
6,685 Scott Sweeney's Kona 1/08
6,684 Sayer Danforth's Bianchi 1/08
6,683 Christian Feldhake's Torelli 1/08
6,682 Scott Spencer's Ed Litton 1/08

Weekend Update

your friday fix
6,681 Seen in DC 1/08
6,680 Dru's Raleigh 1/08
6,679 Ryan Salamon's Bareknuckle 1/08
6,678 Josh Woodard's Kona 1/08
6,677 Tres Wilson's Pake 1/08
6,676 Sergio's Bianchi 1/08
6,675 Eric Nichols' Gary Fisher 1/08

Vintage Series

your thursday fix
6,674 Daniel Woodall's ivega 1/08
6,673 ?'s Colnago 1/08
6,672 John Williams' Claud Butler 1/08
6,671 Yorgo's Geliano 1/08
6,670 Damien Morrison's Schwinn 1/08
6,669 James Stevenson's Huffy 1/08
6,668 Åsgeir Sundan's Peugeot 1/08

Around the World with Annie
2565 John M's Bianchi
2551 Jeffrey Kelley's bike
1280 Bryan Carroll's Mercian

your wednesday fix
6,667 Carlos Merle's Trek 1/08
6,666 Stuart Townsley's Schwinn 1/08
6,665 Brian Rickett's Centurion 1/08
6,664 Ian Clampett's Masi 1/08
6,663 Dude's ? 1/08
6,662 Jake Swift's Raleigh 1/08
6,661 Larry Hall's IRO 1/08
6,660 Hector Rogers' Giant 1/08
6,659 Evan Giannobile's Miyata 1/08

Art Series [+]

your tuesday fix
6,658 Clifford Ward's Specialized 1/08
6,657 Andy's Schwinn 1/08
6,656 Robin's Rand 1/08
6,655 Ben's Schwinn 1/08
6,654 Micaiah Johnson's Sparton 1/08
6,653 Allison's Schwinn 1/08
6,652 Torbjörn Olofsson's Specialized 1/08
6,651 Mark Bauman's Malvern Star 1/08 V
6,650 Matthew Schulte's Schwinn 1/08
6,649 Carlo's Priori 1/08

your monday fix
6,648 Pie's Trek 1/08
6,647 Willis Wong's Schwinn 1/08
6,646 Samuel Kidron's Lambert 1/08
6,645 Sean ONeill's Bianchi 1/08
6,644 Brody Polinsky's Viner 1/08
6,643 Brody Polinsky's Crammerotti 1/08
6,642 Powell's Centurion 1/08

your friday fix
6,641 Thom Ward's Schwinn 1/08
6,640 Andy Smith's Schwinn 1/08
6,639 Eric N's Motobecane 1/08
6,638 Zack Beatty's Raleigh 1/08
6,637 Adriano Lombardo's Condor 1/08
6,636 Alex Rains' ? 1/08
6,635 James Karst's Raleigh 1/08
6,634 Tom Daly's Schwinn 1/08
6,633 Fritz Abrahamson's KHS 1/08

your thursday fix
6,632 CB Fellerhoff's Diamondback 1/08
6,631 Zach B's ? 1/08
6,630 Matthew Bernhardt's Bianchi 1/08
6,629 Pieter VanderWel's van Herwerden 1/08
6,628 Nathan's Pendle 1/08
6,627 Daniel Bauman's Univega 1/08
6,626 Garrett Ilardi's Giant 1/08
6,625 Chris Baker's Zipp 1/08

Around the World with Annie
2244 Eric Sellers' Bob Jackson
1978 Andrew Jarmain's Claud Butler
1812 Humphrey's Surly

your wednesday fix
6,624 Tim Lynd's Nishiki 1/08
6,623 Benjamin VanLoon's Pake 1/08
6,622 Alec Chipman's IRO 1/08
6,621 Will Watts' Own 1/08
6,620 Arjen Toering's Condor 1/08
6,619 Tobias Uhlich's Gazelle 1/08
6,618 Ryan Stanis' KHS 1/08
6,617 Donald Mutina's Paris 1/08

Art Series

your tuesday fix
6,616 Tom G's Raleigh 1/08
6,615 Tom G's Univega 1/08
6,614 Francis Fortin's Norco 1/08
6,613 Raymond Walker's Ross 1/08
6,612 Tye Worthington's Schwinn 1/08
6,611 Bob Gontarski's Raleigh 1/08
6,610 Jason Graver's Trek 1/08
6,609 Phil Barge's Own 1/08

your monday fix
6,608 Billy Burch's Schwinn 1/08
6,607 Sean OBrien's Univega 1/08
6,606 Graham L's Surly 1/08
6,605 Anssi Lilja's ? 1/08
6,604 Paul's Surly 1/08
6,603 Lucian Foehr's Tommaso 1/08
6,602 Jeffrey Frey's Milwaukee 1/08
6,601 David Morisset's Fetish 1/08

Weekend Update

your friday fix
6,600 Erik's Sherpa 1/08
6,599 Gabez' Orange 1/08
6,598 Eric Davis' Sparton 1/08
6,597 Jason Stratton's Schwinn 1/08
6,596 Steve's Specialized 1/08
6,595 Steve's Coppi 1/08
6,594 Hale's Fuji 1/08
6,593 Dylan May's Gazelle 1/08

your thursday fix
6,592 David Warren's ? 1/08
6,591 Samuel Cunningham's Mercier 1/08
6,590 Andy's ? 1/08
6,589 Yant Martin-Keyte's Kestrel 1/08
6,588 Ben Oliver's Gillott 1/08
6,587 Darby Collier's Maruishi 1/08
6,586 Beard Papa's Surly 1/08

Around the World with Annie
3143 Matthew McHugh's SLX
2756 Bob Lombardo's Carlton
718 Ian Parkinson's SJS

your wednesday fix
6,585 Rachel Alves' Nishiki 1/08
6,584 ?'s Sekai 1/08
6,583 Andrew Williams' Miyata 1/08
6,582 Rafael Smutny's Peugeot 1/08
6,581 Eric Freyer's Fuji 1/08
6,580 Rudy Aragon's Bianchi 1/08
6,579 Seen in San Francisco 1/08
6,578 David Russitano's Mercier 1/08

Art Series

your tuesday fix
6,577 Jacob Bouchard's Own 1/08
6,576 Blake Miller's Motobecane 1/08
6,575 G Galland's Motobecane 1/08
6,574 Eric Totten's IRO 1/08
6,573 Alan Sikiric's Bilenky 1/08
6,572 Alan Sikiric's Yamaguchi 1/08
6,571 Alan Sikiric's Mercian 1/08
6,570 Alan Sikiric's Bianchi 1/08
6,569 Jonathan Mellows's Bianchi 1/08

your monday fix
6,568 Dietmar Wachtmann's Kona 1/08
6,567 Pedram Parasmand's Raleigh 1/08
6,566 Jason Hillman's Schwinn 1/08
6,565 Shapathanal Daly's KHS 1/08
6,564 Simon May's Bianchi 1/08
6,563 Simon Middleton's Carlton 1/08
6,562 Robert Simon's Masi 1/08
6,561 Simon May's IRO 1/08
6,560 Simon Caver's Azuki 1/08

Weekend Update [+]

your friday fix
6,559 John Goolsky's ? 1/08
6,558 Richard Smith's Bareknuckle 1/08
6,557 Dick Leggs' ? 1/08
6,556 Sean Burns' Nashbar 1/08
6,555 Brad Hunt's Puch 1/08
6,554 Peter Barrett's Windsor 1/08
6,553 Stephen's Raleigh 1/08

your thursday fix
6,552 Jimmy Deaton's Fuji 1/08
6,551 Sam Guttman's Bob Jackson 1/08
6,550 Chris Merrill's Bottecchia 1/08
6,549 Krzysztof Poradzinski's Tempo 1/08
6,548 Loris' Orbea 1/08
6,547 Zach Kingsland's Miyata 1/08
6,546 Logan Miller's Colnago 1/08
6,545 Stuart Sanders's Peugeot 1/08

Around the World with Annie
1589 Mike Novo's Rossin
838 Andrew Love's Klein
99 Lynn Forrest's Cinelli

your wednesday fix
6,544 Axel Ringelschwandtner's Brennabor V
6,543 Ben Swankie's Kuwahara 1/08
6,542 Joseph Sandoval's Colnago 1/08
6,541 Ryan Hunt's Specialized 1/08
6,540 Robyn Blake's Univega 1/08
6,539 Drew W's Pinarello 1/08
6,538 Stuart Townsley's Cannondale 1/08

Art Series

your tuesday fix
6,537 Jeff Pryor's Schwinn 1/08
6,536 Tess' Schwinn 1/08
6,535 Cactus' Schwinn 1/08
6,534 Mike Dewes' Schwinn 1/08
6,533 Jake Schoellkopf's Schwinn 1/08
6,532 Adam Eldridge's Schwinn 1/08
6,531 Rich Mal's Schwinn 1/08


Archives - click to see.

2,171 Bikes Submitted in 2007 (4358 to 6530)
1,458 Bikes Submitted in 2006 (2867 to 4358)
1,418 Bikes Submitted in 2005 (1448 to 2866)
1,041 Bikes Submitted in 2004 (590 to 1447)
406 Bikes Submitted in 2003 (184 to 589)
131 Bikes Submitted in 2002 (52 to 183)
51 Bikes Submitted in 2001 (FGG #1 to 51)

What the Gallery looked like seven years ago is here

		


All long-sleeved Tees are on sale at One Gear - Take'a look.


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Source: [[Fixed Gear Gallery|http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/]]

On [[VisualTW|License]], you will find several plugins for TiddlyWiki
!!Wysiwyg edition
*[[EasyEdit|EasyEditPlugin]], a lite and fully integrated solution.
*[[FCKEditor|FCKeditorPlugin]], a more powerful solution, but requires an external component (FCKeditor).
*[[Externalize|ExternalizePlugin]], to edit tiddlers in your favorite application like html editor, text or word processor, javascript IDE, css editor, ...<<br>>Externalize requires ''Firefox'' and [[it's All Text!|https://addons.mozilla.org/fr/firefox/addon/4125]] ''extension''.
A demo of these different plugins is available [[here|WysiwygDemo]].
!!Tabs, fields, encryption, ...
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<html>
<h1>Girt by Sea -a Play by Dave Riley</h1>
<p>
__________________________<br>
CHARACTERS<br>
COOEE!<br>
AUSSIE OI!<br>
INTERCOM (Some amplification and voice distortion required as through a loud hailer.) 
<br>
_________________<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
FX SOUND OF VOICES DEVELOPED FROM A BABEL MIX OF MIDDLE EASTERN AND ASIAN LANGUAGES.<br>
<br>
AS VOICES EBB THEY BLEND WITH THE SOUND OF WAVES LAPPING ON A BEACH.<br>
<br>
ROUGH DRUM ROLL FOLLOWED BY A SINGLE DISCORDANT NOTE FROM A PARTY WHISTLE OR KAZOO. 
FOLLOWED BY COUGHING AND MURMUING AS IN A HALL OF PEOPLE.<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
COOEE! AUSSIE OI! (TOGETHER. SINGING UNACCOMPANIED.) <br>
Australians let us all rejoice<br>
AUSSIE OI! For we are young and free<br>
With ……..and <br>
Our home is girt by sea….<br>
<br>
COOEE! (IN TUNE - HUM/UM) <br>
La da de da de da da da<br>
<br>
AUSSIE OI! A beauty rich and rare<br>
<br>
COOEE! (IN TUNE - HUM/UM) <br>
<br>
Ummm Hmmmm Hmmm Hmmm Ummm Hm<br>
<br>
<br>
COOEE!/AUSSIE OI : (TOGETHER)<br>
<br>
AD vance Os tray lia fair….!<br>
<br>
<br>
FX: DRUM ROLL. MUCH WHISTLE AND KAZOO BLOWING HAD BY ALL. SUDDEN SHARP BEAT. SILENCE<br>
<br>
<br>
COOEE! Girted by sea.--<br>
<br>
AUSSIE OI! Makes you think.<br>
<br>
COOEE! To "girt". <br>
<br>
AUSSIE OI! "Girtedness".<br>
<br>
COOEE! Aussie! Aussie! Aussie! <br>
<br>
AUSSIE OI! Oi! Oi! Oi!
</p><p>(BOTH LAUGH.)<br>
  <br>
  FX: BLOW AND HUMMING OF KAZOOS. DRUM BEAT. STOP).<br>
  <br>
  COOEE! Girt--<br>
  <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Sea.<br>
  <br>
  FX: BABBLE OF ASIAN AND MIDDLE EASTERN LANGUAGES.<br>
  <br>
  COOEE! Land.<br>
  <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Girt-<br>
  <br>
  COOEE! Sea.<br>
  <br>
  FX: BABBLE OF ASIAN AND MIDDLE EASTERN LANGUAGES.<br>
  <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Land.<br>
  <br>
  COOEE! Girt-<br>
  <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Sea.<br>
  <br>
  FX: BRIEF BABBLE OF ASIAN AND MIDDLE EASTERN LANGUAGES.<br>
  <br>
  (AUSSIE OI &amp; COOEE! THEN DO THIS CIRCUIT OVER AND OVER FASTER AND FASTER 
  RAISING THEIR VOICES UNTIL…)<br>
  <br>
  AUSSIE OI!: Land.<br>
  <br>
  COOEE! Girt-<br>
  <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Sea.<br>
  <br>
  FX: BABBLE STOPS<br>
  <br>
  (PAUSE.)<br>
  <br>
  COOEE!/AUSSIE OI! <br>
  Refugees! <br>
  <br>
  FX: DOUBLE DRUM BEAT.<br>
  <br>
  COOEE! Over there,…<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Beyond the girt<br>
  COOEE! Beyond the girt… people live in garbage tips.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Over there, they work for next to nothing. <br>
  COOEE! Over there, life is cheap.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! The root problem over there… is… <br>
  COOEE! --there's too many of them <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Over there.<br>
  COOEE! Or they're not over here.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Over here, you can live the life of Riley if you work hard. <br>
  COOEE! But we don't want them from over there working hard over here.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! If they were over here who'd be working over there making all the 
  stuff we buy over there?<br>
  COOEE! So all those over there need to stay over there so over here can stay 
  the same. If they weren't over there we couldn't enjoy over here as much as 
  we do. So we need them over there.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! And they need us over here. That's the rule, the status quo…that's 
  geography in the market place.<br>
  COOEE! Thus the girt! <br>
  AUSSIE OI! (AGREEING)<br>
  Thus the girt! <br>
  COOEE! Without us over here, who'd buy what they've got to sell? It's a well 
  known fact that over there you can live much cheaper than over here. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Over here we don't live on garbage tips. Over here we've got a mortgage, 
  a car to run and reticulated sewerage….Over there you can get by without 
  those things.<br>
  COOEE! (ASIDE) So why don't they!<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Over here we've got problems. Over there they have them too. But 
  the problems over there are just so BIG.<br>
  FX: DRUMBEAT.ROLL. CYMBAL.<br>
  COOEE! Over here we have a big enough task making ends meet. Over there it is 
  probably the same…but hey! we're not over there, we're over here. And since 
  we are over here, over there is a world away.<br>
  COOEE! Thus the girt! <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Thus the girt! So who gives a stuff, if over there gets it tougher 
  than we get it over here.<br>
  COOEE! It's all relative. That's life. <br>
  COOEE! AUSSIE OI! (TOGETHER) <br>
  Fortunately it 's not ours.<br>
  FX: DRUMBEAT - CALL TO QUARTERS.<br>
  INTERCOM I wouldn't "jump the queue" if I was you<br>
  "Cause we got ways and means.<br>
  Of making sure we lock the door <br>
  To protect our coastal seams.<br>
  <br>
  Wether you swim or drown <br>
  It's all the same<br>
  'Cause we don't give a stuff<br>
  Blather and cry, winge and complain<br>
  It's useless --- we play tough.<br>
  <br>
  Girt by sea we can live with <br>
  Refugees we can't.<br>
  We secure our borders<br>
  By giving orders --<br>
  One rule for all when you approach our door <br>
  It's simple, just …piss off!<br>
  COOEE! Globalise existence if you will. We're ready here downunder. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Restructured--<br>
  COOEE! Best practiced--<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Marketed--<br>
  COOEE! Fiscally reformed--<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Downsized--<br>
  COOEE! Privatised--<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Corporatised.<br>
  COOEE! Christ! We got a GST!<br>
  AUSSIE OI! So come on world <br>
  COOEE! Oi! Oi! Oi! <br>
  AUSSIE OI! And do you stuff: <br>
  COOEE! Send us your huddled downturns, your in-balanced sheets and your homeless 
  capital yearning to be free!<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Oi! Oi! Oi! <br>
  COOEE! This is Australia calling. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! (SHOUTING)<br>
  Coooooooo_____ee! <br>
  FX "COOEEE" ECHOES…ENDS. THEN: <br>
  ANNOUNCER'S VOICE (FAR OFF. IN CLIPPED ENGLISH ACCENT OTHER THAN AUSTRALIAN) 
  <br>
  Stay where you are Australia - I'm coming over!<br>
  FX: FIRST THREE BARS PLAYED BY A BRASS BAND OF ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR. THIS 
  ENDS ABRUPTLY.<br>
  CARCOPHANY OF ASIAN URBAN SOUNDS MESHES WITH ANTHEN FROM WHICH EMERGE…CHORUS: 
  AUSSIE OI'S AND COOEE'S VOICES EITHER PRE-RECORDED AND PLAYED IN FAST MODE OR 
  THE SAME ACTORS EMPLOYING DIFFERENT OR DISTORTED VOICES . <br>
  <br>
  <br>
  1ST VOICE I don't know who they think they are fooling --<br>
  2ND VOICE We suffer and starve and go without schooling.<br>
  1ST VOICE: To make ends meet we gotta come cheap --<br>
  2ND VOICE Selling our labour till the end of the week.<br>
  1ST VOICE They told us the old days were over and gone -<br>
  2ND VOICE But everyone knows the same days live on.<br>
  IST VOICE Labour and capital, rich and poor -- <br>
  2ND VOICE We don't want to live like this anymore.<br>
  IST VOICE We need some respite <br>
  2ND VOICE But what do we get? <br>
  1ST VOICE The same old "solution" -<br>
  BOTH Debt! Debt! Debt! …<br>
  FX: THIS EXTENDS INTO A BALINESE STYLE MONKEY CHANT WHICH DRIFTS INTO THE BACKGROUND 
  WHILE AUSSIE OI! SPEAKS. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! What are we going to do? Offshore -- everywhere -- there's all these 
  people dead set keen on coming here or any location offering a shot at three 
  meals a day and an indoor toilet. Not that that's guaranteed, but that's the 
  promise in the promised lands. And whether you recognise it or not what we've 
  got here in the way of material pleasures is as good as it gets. Yesiree, it 
  won't get any better than this. You may have misgivings. You may be one of those 
  who harps on and on about how hard done by you are. Get a life! Instead of being 
  born into a triple-fronted brick veneer low set and a regular breakfast of Weetbix 
  plus choice of beverage, you could have been stuck in the household of a landless 
  peasant from Upper Volta with early tuberculosis and a nasty case of intestinal 
  worms. Get real, matey! You've got it good. <br>
  FX: "DEBT" MONKEY CHANT STOPS'<br>
  INTERCOM Stay away. <br>
  FX: WAVES ON BEACH<br>
  INTERCOM Stay away. Stay away. <br>
  FX: WAVES ON BEACH. STOP.<br>
  COOEE! Sheep shit in the South Pacific. With your baa lambs and your empty sky, 
  you big fella stretched out sun baking.. Sunburnt. Sleepy. Empty. You lucky 
  bastard of a country. You your own boss cockie. Sheep shit and blowies. My country. 
  "Core of my heart."… My suburban quarter acre block with 3 b/rms, 
  VJ interior, carpeted floors, refurb kitchen and all cons. You it. You girt 
  by sea. You gloating in your wee little Aussie battlers this small. Youse the 
  underdog. Youse all mates. Too bloody right you are… So with a sprig of 
  wattle in our hand we celebrate from whence we came. Australians! You true blue 
  sons and daughters of Oz! I ask you to charge your glasses and raise your voices. 
  And let's hear it for all the dinky-dyes out there:<br>
  (ATTEMPT AT SINGING)<br>
  Australians let us all rejoice, for we are young and free ... etcetera, et…cet…tera…rah…rah…rah…rah!.<br>
  FX: MERGES INTO BACKGROUND OF DRUNKEN PARTY EXCHANGE WITH CLINKING OF GLASSWARE. 
  TAPERS OFF. <br>
  INTERCOM Stay away!<br>
  FX: WAVES ON BEACH<br>
  INTERCOM Go back where you came from!<br>
  FX: WAVES ON BEACH<br>
  INTERCOM You're not wanted here!<br>
  FX: WAVES ON BEACH STOP.<br>
  (PAUSE)<br>
  COOEE! If we offend it is with our good will. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! We want the best <br>
  COOEE! The very best <br>
  AUSSIE OI! For all and sundry. <br>
  COOEE! For you--<br>
  AUSSIE OI! And you-- <br>
  COOEE! And you--<br>
  AUSSIE OI! For all of us. <br>
  COOEE! In this dry brown land do dwell. <br>
  (PAUSE)<br>
  AUSSIE OI! But the job market is so very, very tight. <br>
  COOEE! Let us make this quite clear: Very tight.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! We're not to blame. <br>
  COOEE! Free enterprise being what it is. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Has its ups. <br>
  COOEE! And downs. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Here --<br>
  COOEE! As well as over there --<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Here .. there… is-simply-not-enough-to-go-around. <br>
  COOEE! Not enough land. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Think of our carrying capacity. <br>
  COOEE! Hospital beds. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Think of our carrying capacity. <br>
  COOEE! Pensions. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Think of our carrying capacity. <br>
  COOEE! Money. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! No where near enough of that.<br>
  COOEE! Jobs. <br>
  (PAUSE)<br>
  AUSSIE OI! So if you are down and out ... <br>
  COOEE! We don't want to have to be lifting up our heads and shouting: <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Some wog's got my job!<br>
  COOEE! Do we? <br>
  AUSSIE OI! (ASIDE) Many lands.<br>
  COOEE! (ASIDE) One voice.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! But them --<br>
  COOEE! Them. Them's a different matter. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Sneaking into our country! <br>
  COOEE! (ASIDE) And there's no way of telling them from the locals. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! No way.<br>
  COOEE! No bloody way!<br>
  AUSSIE OI! If they were to-<br>
  COOEE! Play by the rules<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Follow procedures. <br>
  COOEE! Join the queue. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! They'd be most welcome here. <br>
  COOEE! Most welcome.<br>
  (PAUSE)<br>
  AUSSIE OI! (AGGRESSIVELY) Don't come in the first place.<br>
  COOEE! We're not a soft touch. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! (ASIDE) Many lands.<br>
  COOEE! (ASIDE) One voice.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! But to sneak in!<br>
  COOEE! Sneak!<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Without an invite.<br>

  COOEE! We don't want people like that here…<br>
  AUSSIE OI! You never know what to expect…<br>
  COOEE! (ASIDE) It's embarrassing…smudging our picture postcard like that.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! We like to pick our own. <br>
  COOEE! It takes real effort to become a bona fide Australian. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! You don't become one by sneaking into the country, for instance. 
  <br>
  COOEE! That's un-Australian. <br>
  AUSSIE OI! No. To become one you gotta play by the rules.<br>
  COOEE! Our rules.<br>
  COOEE!/AUSSIE OI! (TOGETHER.)<br>
  --We're searching for identity.<br>
  FX FIRST TWO BARS OF WALZING MATILDA. ABRUPTLY STOPS<br>
  AUSSIE OI! (ASIDE) Many lands.<br>
  COOEE! (ASIDE) One voice.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! COOEE! (TOGETHER. CURSORY ATTEMPT AT SINGING )<br>
  We are Aus-tray-lee-yarn.<br>
  COOEE! And just because you're here it doesn't mean you can stay.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! That's taking advantage. <br>
  COOEE! Stay away<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Stay at home.<br>
  COOEE! Go someplace else.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Not here. Out there.<br>
  COOEE! Somewhere.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Beyond the girt.<br>
  FX: WAVES ON BEACH QUICKLY BUILDING IN VOLUME AND POWER WITH A RISING WIND.CRY 
  OF SEAGULLS. MUSIC RISING ABRUPTLY: 'ONEDIN LINE THEME' (THE BALLET MUSIC FROM 
  SPARTACUS BY KHACHATURIAN.)<br>
  COOEE! (SHOUTING) Not here. Out there. Beyond the bloody girt.<br>
  FX: SEA, MUSIC AND WIND SOUNDS TAPER OFF QUICKLY TO SILENCE.<br>
  COOEE! Girt--<br>
  <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Sea.<br>
  <br>
  FX: BABBLE OF ASIAN AND MIDDLE EASTERN LANGUAGES.<br>
  <br>
  COOEE! Land.<br>
  <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Girt-<br>
  <br>
  COOEE! Sea.<br>
  <br>
  FX: BABBLE OF ASIAN AND MIDDLE EASTERN LANGUAGES.<br>
  <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Land.<br>
  <br>
  COOEE! Girt-<br>
  <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Sea.<br>
  <br>
  FX: BABBLE OF ASIAN AND MIDDLE EASTERN LANGUAGES.<br>
  <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Land.<br>
  <br>
  COOEE! Girt-<br>
  <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Sea.<br>
  <br>
  FX: NO BABBLE </p>
<p>(PAUSE)</p>
<p>COOEE!/AUSSIE OI! Refugees! <br>
  FX: CICADAS, BLOW FLIES,ETC ON A HOT SUMMER DAY. <br>
  RISING FROM BACKGROUND -- FAR OFF TO OFF --IS SOUND OF ETHNIC RADIO EG: ARABIC 
  THEN INDONESIAN POP MUSIC -- AS STATIONS ARE CHANGED. THIS IS SUDDENLY SWITCHED 
  OFF AND REPLACED BY STERILE MUSACK. SOUND OF A MICROPHONE BEING HANDLED AND 
  STATIC. <br>
  INTERCOM Unlawful non citizens…Unlawful non citizens….This is not 
  a borderless society. You are not wanted here….You are unauthorized arrivals...You 
  are unauthorized arrivals…You have chosen not to apply for a visa. You 
  refused to line up. You should have staid at home. You have shown no respect 
  for the rule of law in this country...You have shown no respect.<br>
  FX: BLOW FLIES BUZZING<br>
  INTERCOM (PAUSE) <br>
  You are detained as a result of your unauthorised entry, not for asylum seeking 
  …not for seeking asylum. You should have done that before you left to come 
  here. That was your mistake. That was your mistake...You will be removed from 
  here. You will be taken to the place from whence you came…You cannot stay 
  in this country. You are going to be sent home...or somewhere else. You are 
  non citizens who have broken our laws. <br>
  FX: BLOW FLIES BUZZING <br>
  AUSSIE OI! Naughty, naughty, naughty…<br>
  COOEE! We don't like that.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Not at all.<br>
  COOEE! Any offshore resource is similarly girt by law.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Girt by law.<br>
  COOEE! So if any unlawful non citizen were to beach themselves on Christmas 
  Island.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! That's girt by law.<br>
  COOEE! Ashmore reef.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Girt by law.<br>
  COOEE! Cocos Island.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Girt by law.<br>
  COOEE! Oil rigs at sea.<br>
  AUSSIE OI! Girt by law.<br>
  INTERCOM (BARKED AS ON PARADE GROUND)<br>
  Excised offshore places strengthening our territorial integrity.<br>
  <br>
  FX THREE BARS, ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR.<br>
  <br>
  AUSSIE OI!/COOEE! (TOGETHER PSEUDO SINGING IN 4/4 TIME AS SOON AS MUSIC STOPS)<br>
  Girt by law<br>
  Girt by law.</p>
<p>FX: BLOW FLIES BUZZING<br>
  INTERCOM (BARKED AS ON PARADE GROUND)<br>
  As your official detention service provider we have been contracted to run this 
  immigration detention facility.<br>
  AUSSIE OI!/COOEE! (TOGETHER PSEUDO SINGING) <br>
  Girt by law<br>
  Girt by law.<br>
  INTERCOM (PROMOTIONAL) <br>
  For around $120 per person per day twin share we offer a great deal. Three meals 
  a day. Culturally appropriate menus. A bed for all. Laundry facilities. Games 
  room. Shower block. Unlimited chilled water, tea, coffee, milk and sugar. 24 
  hour medical centre. All mod cons. So if you are depressed, severely depressed 
  or slip into psychosis on occasion during your extended stay with us…We're 
  prepared.<br>
  FX: BLOW FLIES BUZZING. STERILE MUSACK* BEGINS. THEN STOPS<br>
  INTERCOM (VOICE MOVE FROM 'OFF' TO 'ON' AS IN PASSING BY] <br>
  No escaping… No self mutilation… No starving to death…No sitting 
  on roofs.... No stitching of lips together…No torching facilities…No 
  rioting … No litigation…No attention seeking…No embarrassing 
  behaviours of any kind … None of that…You can't complain. Not allowed…That's 
  un-Australian.<br>
  [VOICE MOVE FROM 'ON' TO 'OFF', THEN 'FAR OFF' &amp; PART REPEAT THROUGH A FADE.]<br>
  FX: BLOW FLIES BUZZING . SILENCE. STERILE MUSACK BEGINS. THEN STOPS<br>
  INTERCOM Thankyou for waiting. Your application as an unlawful non-citizen is 
  being processed.<br>
  FX: STERILE MUSACK BEGINS. THEN STOPS<br>
  INTERCOM Thankyou for waiting. Your application as an unlawful non-citizen is 
  being processed.<br>
  FX: STERILE MUSACK BEGINS. THEN STOPS<br>
  INTERCOM Thankyou for waiting. Your application as an unlawful non-citizen is 
  being processed.<br>
  FX: STERILE MUSACK BEGINS. THEN STOPS.<br>
  INTERCOM Thankyou for waiting. Your application as an unlawful non-citizen is 
  being processed.<br>
  FX: STERILE MUSACK BEGINS. FADES. SOUND OF A DISCONNECTED PHONE LINE. TAPERS 
  OFF. DRUM ROLL. FOLLOWED BY SINGLE LONG BLOW ON SPORTS WHISTLE<br>
  INTERCOM All men on stage! <br>
  FX: RUNNING ON WOODEN FLOOR.<br>
  INTERCOM Everybody down on one knee! Now bend down low and look battle-worn. 
  A bit more tension there. A touch more gloom on your faces. That's it.<br>
  You there, you'll play the role of Dole Bludger. Now dance over to the others 
  with an expression of furtive glee.<br>
  FX: SINGLE PERSON DANCING ON WOODEN FLOOR.<br>
  INTERCOM Furtive glee, I said, furtive glee! Ah, that's better. <br>
  All available female personnel. Line up!<br>
  FX: RUNNING ON WOODEN FLOOR.<br>
  INTERCOM You -- yes you! -- you're Miss Homelife. Sorry, Mrs Homelife. You seem 
  demure enough for the role. And you're Miss Equality, because it's all the same 
  to me whoever plays the part. And you're Miss Australia, so look stalwart and 
  generous. Stalwart and generous, I said! <br>
  Get ready now. Let's go. <br>
  All you men there, break from your imaginary toil and rise upward toward an 
  imaginary sun. Mrs Homelife, Miss Equality and Miss Australia, minister to them. 
  Minister! Put some love in it! They're your little darlings, for crissake! <br>
  Men, pretend "you have nothing" and imagine "you can make it". 
  Climb over each other, symbolising the effects of a free market economy. Excellent! 
  Now build a pyramid with your competing bodies.<br>
  FX: STRAINED SCRAMBLE OF BODIES. SOME FALLING. <br>
  INTERCOM How about a little teamwork there! That's better. Dole Bludger, lay 
  down flat so you can break their fall. <br>
  You on top, take an imaginary flag in your hand and wave it to the tempo of 
  a free country, conveying the joy of being a victorious Aussie battler. Great. 
  <br>
  All ladies stand up. Come on up you get. Hang imaginary garlands around the 
  necks of everyone -- for trying. That's to symbolise the blooming of happiness 
  that only comes with effort. <br>
  Wonderful! That's it. That's it! Let in the sheep. Bring up the kookaburra chorus. 
  <br>
  FX BACKGROUND: SHEEP. KOOKABURRA CALL.<br>
  INTERCOM Add the didgeridoo. <br>
  FX BACKGROUND: DIDGERIDOO LEAD IN. ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR SLOWLY RISING<br>
  <br>
  INTERCOM Now, unfold the flag. Slouch hats on. Wave the sprigs of wattle. I 
  said, wave them -- hold them aloft and give them a bloody good shake. That's 
  better. Now all you ethnics in the front row, face the front and smile. Good. 
  Excellent. Send in the wombat and the kangaroo. And you, indigenous Australian 
  blackfella-type person in a loin cloth, show us your teeth. Now we're cooking. 
  Are we happy or what? I can't hear it? Are we happy? You bet we are. <br>
  (PAUSE)<br>
  No wonder they all want to come here.<br>
  FX ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR RISES QUICKLY IN VOLUME AND OCHESTRATION. THEN FADES. 
  WAVES ON BEACH. BLOW FLIES BUZZING.<br>
  <br>
  FINIS</p>
<p> <br>
  *STERILE MUSACK: [Suggestion] The same few bars--repeated each time-from the 
  instrumental version of The Girl from Ipanema (Antonio Carlos Jobim)</p>
<hr>
<p align="center"><a href="http://www.aiaa.org.au/news/news15/news.html">Back to Contents</a><br>

</p></html>
COVER STORY
Child-care subsidies: only for the rich

24 February 1993

By Pip Hinman

While the media have made much of federal Labor's child-care cash rebate proposal, child-care workers are not as eager to embrace what they regard as anything but a fairer system.

“To start with, the 30% rebate is not available to people on the lowest fee and those using child-care for non-work-related purposes”, a child-care worker who wanted to remain anonymous for fear of losing her job told Green Left Weekly. “As the new system is not means tested, those paying more each week for child-care -- that is, those in the higher income bracket -- stand to get nearly twice the rebate of those on the lower end of the scale.”

According to a 1990 Australian Bureau of Statistics survey, out of the 550,000 families who use paid child-care, only 230,000 are expected to qualify for the 30% rebate. The average rebate would be just $12.50 per week, and most families would get less than $10. About 135,000 working parents now receiving fee relief would be eligible to receive only a small additional benefit under the new scheme.

Those parents paying $270 per week will be eligible for a weekly rebate of $61.20 (22.7% of the original fee) if they have more than one child in child-care. In comparison, parents spending $27 per week on child-care will be eligible for a rebate of $3.30 for one or more children (12.2% of the original fee).

The 1990 ABS survey found that only 6.9% of families using child-care spent more than $60 per week. Almost two-thirds had a weekly income of more than $800, putting them in the top third of income-earners. According to the February 11 Age, of families spending more than $100 per week on child-care -- the biggest beneficiaries under the government's new scheme -- 74% had an income of more than $800 per week.

While the survey found that 90% of the lower-income families using child-care pay less than $20 per week due to the fee relief scheme, this sector is also forced to rely on informal child-care arrangements -- parents, relatives and friends.

The other major problem with the new scheme, according to the child-care worker, is that rebates will be offered only for child-care incurred while parents are working, studying or looking for work. “Those parents, mainly mothers at home simply looking for some respite, or those who want to use

child-care for the value and quality it can provide to their children's lives, will be denied access.”

The Democratic Socialist candidate for Melbourne, Di Quin, queried the federal government's commitment to an extra 104,500 new child-care places. “The ALP promised 50,000 new places in 1990 and delivered less than half”, Quin told Green Left.

“Over 1991-92, 2502 community centre-based places were promised, yet only 770 places actually materialised. Of the 6760 out of school hours places promised, only 4460 were provided. With this record, who can be accused of being cynical when Keating makes promises he obviously doesn't have a commitment to keeping?

“With a growing unmet demand for child-care places, it would be nice to get excited about Keating's talk of thousands of new places. But the reality is that Labor is out for the women's vote -- in particular the high-income women's vote.”

Indeed, both Labor and Liberals are adopting a user-pays approach to child-care, just like other community services.

“Increasingly women are realising that the two major parties can come up with nothing but a few shonky bribes before elections”, says Quin. “With policies which are almost identical, women have to look around for political alternatives; while they may be small at this stage, they can at least articulate the concerns and aspirations of the majority of women, who are now disenfranchised by the no-choice political system. Women need free, quality child-care now.”
This article was posted on the Green Left Weekly H

Source: [[Green Left - Cover Story: Child-care subsidies: only for the rich|http://www.greenleft.org.au/1993/89/4544]]
Global imbalances and financial volatility -- an explosive mix



Dick Nichols

The previous article in this series (GLW #674) discussed the debate among mainstream economists about the seriousness of “global economic imbalances”, in particular the US current account deficit (CAD). This reached 6.4% of US GDP by the end of 2005, stirring fears that the US economy might be heading for a violent “adjustment”.

What would such an event look like? A sudden drop in the US$8 billion inflow needed every working day both to finance the US CAD and counterbalance US investment flows abroad would sharply depreciate the dollar, lift import prices and force the US Federal Reserve Board to increase interest rates to contain inflation.

Asset values (and the credit and consumption growth they increasingly underpin) would stagnate or collapse. The US CAD — that is, the gap between US domestic savings and investment — would eventually shrink, but only after an initial increase due to increased interest payments on US foreign debt. The price of the smaller CAD would be slower growth or even recession— as in the Asian 1997-98 crisis. Any further increase in energy prices would intensify the blow and with it the prospect of a global economic slump.

It is impossible to predict which economic bloc would bear the greatest part of the US-initiated global slump. However, if the east Asian economies sought to defend their export share by defending their currency pegs with the dollar, almost the entire initial shrinkage in growth would be channelled into the underdeveloped economies and — via an overvalued euro — into “Euroland”.

Would the Australian economy once again be able to duck and weave its way through such a slump? It's very hard to imagine the Reserve Bank, repeating the manoeuvre that got Australia through the 1997-98 Asian economic crisis and the 2001 global slowdown — by allowing interest rates to fall and the Australian dollar to depreciate. That’s because the epicentre of the global slump would be in the world's leading nation economy — accounting for 25% of world economic activity.

The Reserve Bank's room to manoeuvre would be even less if energy prices and inflation held up as growth slowed, in a revisiting of the “stagflation” of the 1970s.

All very scary. But the US currency has gone through waves of appreciation and depreciation, depending mainly on relative growth rates of the main economic blocs and the interest rate differentials among them without touching off a global slump.

Nonetheless, as sober an authority as the Bank for International Settlements (BIS, the central banks' central bank) can't rule out a “banana republic” episode for the dollar. In its latest annual report, it argues that the potential for a run on the greenback lies in global financial market instability combined with the existence of the euro.

The BIS writes: “Given the relationships among all markets, both domestic and international, there is reasonable likelihood that if one market were to come under significant stress, it would spill over to others ... Both private and public sector purchasers of US dollar liabilities might, at some point, lose patience in such a situation.”

A possible straw in the wind was the February 18-22, 2005 fall of the dollar against the yen (1.2%) and the euro (1%), the result of rumours that South Korea’s central bank was about to shift some of its $200 billion in foreign exchange reserves out of dollar holdings. This event confirmed that even small shifts in official foreign exchange reserve weightings could have large “multiplier” effects in today's markets.
Corporate investment

Moreover, financial market instability, while still low at this point in the business cycle, is beginning to rise and is bound to increase. This is the result of the intersection between two recent powerful economic trends.

One is the easy money policy of the central banks of the imperialist centres carried out to prevent the 2001 downturn from becoming a serious recession (a policy applied in Japan since the 1990 collapse of the property and stock markets). This poured massive liquidity into the banks and corporate treasuries, especially in the US where it was combined with tax breaks to business.

The second is that — despite the large corporate profits, which hardly dipped during 2001 — in the US, Japan and Europe the rate of new investment remains historically low. In the words of the International Monetary Fund's Raghuram Rajan, “corporations don't seem to be investing serious amounts at this point in the cycle. They are below where they should be in their investment patterns ... as they are flush with cash”.

Three-quarters of this ocean of undistributed corporate profits is due to the fall in investment in production within the developed capitalist economies (Australia remains an exception), as the corporations invest a smaller share of their takings in upgrading and expanding their capital stock. Also, with the important exception of China, rates of investment in east Asian economies remain below those prevailing before the 1997-98 crisis.

This trend is partly due to the declining price of capital goods relative to all other goods (especially in the information and communications sector), partly to the decision to reduce overall indebtedness by paying back the debts accumulated in the 1990s “new economy” boom out of retained earnings, partly to nervousness about exposure to volatile financial markets and partly to an increase in “just-in-case” cash holdings (especially when faced with unfunded liabilities like company pension schemes).

However, the most important factor has been the accelerating drive towards the global rationalisation of production coming out of the 2000-01 recession. The corporations have been engaged in both massive share buybacks (greater than new issues in some countries) as well as in pursuing a strategy of expansion through acquiring assets abroad, especially but not only in the “emerging economies” of Asia.

As a result, the proportion of corporate earnings devoted to dividend payouts, share buybacks, mergers and acquisitions and generally speculative investment has been unprecedented.

During 2001-05, vast tides of funds combed world financial markets looking for profit in everything from Filipino government bonds to nickel futures, seemingly impervious to the riskiness of the “financial instruments” on offer.

Over this period, differences in the rate of return on all forms of debt — government versus commercial, developed capitalist versus “emerging economy”, short-term versus long-term, etc — all narrowed to an unprecedented degree. Indeed, such was the demand for longer-term debt (10-year bonds or longer) that for a while long-term interest rates fell below short-term rates in some bond markets.
Financial tremors

The question now is how all this debt (and the institutions obliged to meet payments) will perform in the new cycle of rising interest rates and financial market nervousness. One tremor took place in February this year in that exotic speculative market — the “yen carry trade”. Here the punter borrows yen (where the cash rate has been zero) then invests the funds in a high-interest currency (like Icelandic krona assets). The bet is that the yen won't appreciate nor Japanese interest rates rise, so that the speculator will receive the gain from the interest rate differential (plus any capital gains) once the funds invested are converted back into yen.

The only problem is if suspicion grows that krona assets are about to devalue, and/or that the krona is about to depreciate against the yen and/or that interest rates are about to rise in Japan. Then there's a stampede to get out of kronas, bringing about the very depreciation that was feared.

In February, after ratings agency Fitch downgraded Icelandic debt, the krona fell by 7% against the US dollar, producing sympathetic, although temporary, falls in other high-interest, large CAD currencies, including the Australian dollar.

Other recent examples of volatility have been the May-June drop in stock indexes (particularly in Middle Eastern countries like Saudi Arabia, which fell 50% from its peak even though oil profits have been skyrocketing). Speculation has also been furious and nervous in raw materials, stocks and mortgage- and asset-backed securities.

In the vast US mortgage-backed securities (MBS) market growth in recent years has been driven by the bundling into bonds (“securitisation”) of mortgages contracted by “non-prime” borrowers: in 2005, 40% of MBSs issued were backed by mortgages, as against 10% in the late 1990s.

Also potentially headed for tricky times is the speculative den of the hedge funds, which punt on movements in publicly traded stocks, debt, foreign exchange and derivatives. Hedge funds are basically like insurance agents writing policies for other market “players” and pocketing the premiums. When markets crash — as with the Asian economic crisis and the 1998 Russian crisis — hedge funds more often than not lose money. Moreover, because they are highly leveraged these losses can be enormous, as with the 1998 near-meltdown of the US fund Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM), bailed out by a consortium of banks brought together by the Federal Reserve.

Despite claims that hedge funds now manage risk and monitor market movements better than before LTCM, they have confronted generally benign markets. However, such has been the tide of money into hedge funds since 2004 that returns are dropping as their hunt for new opportunities intensifies on a global scale.

Crunches will come. Will the funds then be able to prove unfounded the opinion of Jochen Sanjo, the head of the German financial regulator BaFin, that “hedge funds pose a big threat to the stability of the world financial system”?

Around the world, central bank attention is presently fixated on the problem of how to carry out anti-inflationary interest rate rises so as not to unduly exacerbate the interaction between global imbalances and financial market volatility. This effort is also taking place when financial regulators are struggling to keep up with the rapidly multiplying variety of corporate “financial products” and when the impact of global financial market integration on national monetary (interest rate) policy is hard to assess.

But this situation is not something that even the cleverest monetary policy alone can control. On the battlefield of global capitalist competition, both fiscal (budgetary) and “structural reform” (a la Work Choices) are under rising pressure to make their contribution to stabilisation.

Despite the high global growth rates of the last three years and the increased room for economy policy manoeuvre they have allowed, stable capitalist growth is not firmly entrenched. Indeed, in the present phase of rapidly rising global economic integration the fundamental trend is not towards increasingly uniform and stable conditions of profit-making across the main economic blocs, but increasing contradiction and inter-bloc rivalry.

The combined and uneven development of these contradictions and the political impact of attempts to soften them will be the focus of the last article in this series.

[Dick Nichols is the managing editor of Seeing Red. For sources used in this article contact <dicknichols@greenleft.org.au>.]

Source: [[Green Left - Issues: Global imbalances and financial volatility -- an explosive mix|http://www.greenleft.org.au/2006/680/7844]]
Global imbalances and the Australian economy

17 November 1993

Dick Nichols

The second article in this four-part series on the Australian economy (see GLW #672) discussed the causes of the US economy's unprecedentedly large current account deficit (CAD), which reached 6.4% of gross domestic product at the end of 2005. But is this CAD (and matching current account surpluses in other economies) really a serious problem?

Without doing too much damage to the subtleties of the debate, the spread of opinion about these “global imbalances” oscillates between two poles — the complacent and the alarmist.

Harvard economics professor Richard Cooper best represents the former position. “I believe that the US has comparative advantage at producing marketable assets”, wrote Cooper in the Brookings Papers on Economic Activity journal (No. 1, 2005). “We sell these marketable assets to the rest of the world. As long as Americans use the proceeds of the sale of those marketable assets productively... I do not see why that process cannot go on indefinitely ... on the current scale, that is, roughly half a trillion dollars a year.”

International Monetary Fund economic counsellor Raghuram Rajan exemplifies mainstream alarmism, asking in the IMF’s April 2006 World Economic Outlook April 2006, “should we worry about the size of the global current account imbalances, given that they have been financed for so long? I think we should. For one, the benign global financing conditions appear to be turning so the past need not say much about the future. More important, the imbalances are unsustainable at their current level...”

A third possibility — that the global imbalances may produce a brutal rerun of the 1997-98 Asian crisis on a global scale — can't be ruled out. It's the spectre haunting the debate, but doesn't get much of a run in public, partly for fear of spooking those very markets capable of triggering a violent “adjustment”.

The debate revolves around three broad themes. What is the real economic situation revealed by the US CAD (and how reliable are the balance of payments statistics anyway)? How likely is an abrupt CAD reversal? In the event of reversal, what would be the likely impact on the US and the other main economic blocs?
Assessing debt burden

A persistent argument made against general CAD alarmism is that it is misleading to talk about a country's debt being, for example, 58% of GDP (the Australian case), when the vast majority of this debt is not debt for which “the country” is liable. These foreign borrowings have been made by private capitalist businesses that have calculated that the debt can be serviced out of future profits. If that calculation proves mistaken, they will go bankrupt, be taken over or restructure their debt.

The only debt burden that really bears on the economic credibility of the country is official (i.e., government) foreign debt, which in the Australian federal case has been wiped out by the Howard-Costello government’s penny-pinching. At the state government level, debt has been reduced to the point that all Australian states have regained their AAA credit rating. The IMF is holding up Australia as “top of the class” for this policy.

A second general point against alarmism is that it is misleading to measure a country's net foreign liabilities (an accumulated stock) against its GDP (which measures the flow of output produced). For example, when Australia's net foreign liabilities are measured as a percentage of its private wealth less housing, its foreign debt position has improved over the past decade (from 26% to 18%).

One motive for scepticism about the seriousness of the US CAD arises because, despite years of increasing net foreign liabilities, the US each year still registers a net profit. For some this can only be explained by unobserved “dark matter” in US assets abroad (e.g., the drug trade).

The counter argument stresses the vital fact that US investments abroad have always earned a higher rate of return than assets in the US owned by foreigners (a difference averaging 3.1 percentage points between 1983 and 2003).

When US foreign assets are valued in terms of the actual flow of profits they generate (rather than in conventional stock terms), the net US international investment position as a percentage of GDP is +7% rather than -22% (as of December 2004). However, if present trends continue, even this way of measuring the US's position will soon turn negative.

Other observers stress that net foreign debt doesn't just express the accumulation of CADs — it is the residual between gross stocks of foreign assets and liabilities. In the US case, with huge stocks of both foreign assets and liabilities, influences on their value (for example, share market performance) can have a big impact on net debt as the residual.

Also, US gross foreign liabilities are almost all in US dollars, while US gross foreign assets are only 40% in dollars. Therefore, a depreciation of the dollar, besides making US exports cheaper, also improves its net international investment position: US asset holders get more for their non-dollar investments in dollar terms while foreign investors in the US get less in their own currencies for their US assets.

According to some economists, up to a third of US foreign debt obligations has been covered by this revaluation effect and today's US CAD is actually smaller in real terms than in 1987 — the year of the last CAD scare — because the stock of US assets held abroad in foreign currencies is proportionately larger. Given the increasing percentage of US national economic assets owned by foreigners this effect can be expected to continue.

The alarmists acknowledge this “revaluation scam”, but point out that it can last only so long as investors in dollar assets are prepared to put up with lower rates of return. Sooner or later, they argue, the victims of any scam wake up — who will buy dollar assets if convinced that the US intends to deliberately devalue them at some time in the future? At that point US interest rates would have to rise to prevent investors exiting into other currencies and the end of the dollar as the world's reserve currency and store of value would be one step closer.
East Asia-US 'co-dependency'

What real likelihood of a US CAD crisis is there when east Asian central banks have to buy up US debt in order to stop their currencies from appreciating? According to this argument, the east Asian surpluses and the rough peg of their currencies with the US dollar — the basis of their export-driven development model — determine that the US CAD will continue.

Any sell-off by these central banks, particularly by the Chinese and Japanese central banks, would depreciate the dollar, force the US to raise interest rates, slow world growth and reduce demand for these countries’ exports. In short, east Asia's own economic health depends on feeding the US debt habit.

The alarmists take little comfort from this argument for “structural co-dependency”. They argue that even from the point of view of east Asian economic self-interest, “co-dependency” isn't set in stone. Returns on their US assets are low and at some point the benefit of the deal must come into question, especially as there would be huge losses for east Asian economies if the dollar depreciated unexpectedly. Also, within the east Asian economies themselves, it may prove hard to prevent their huge foreign currency reserves from eventually feeding inflation.

Need a sharp “correction” of the US CAD have a disastrous impact on the “real economy”? A recent study for the US Federal Reserve Board argues that, as opposed to the 1997-98 Asian crisis, sustained CADs in developed capitalist countries have usually ended benignly and that wide shifts in currency values aren't necessarily disastrous for the “real economy”.

The sceptics point out that the study deals with CADs in the order of 3% of GDP or less. Above that level, examples of sharp devaluations that have not stifled growth have been exceptional (like Australia in 1997-98 and 2001) — especially when combined with a sudden stop in capital inflow a current account “reversal” has usually resulted in a big growth slowdown.

That this scenario has not yet taken place in an economy the size of the US’s should ring more alarm bells, not less. Never before has the dominant country in the international monetary system built up liabilities on such a scale — the impact of a CAD shock on the US and the world economy would surely be immense.

Behind the reasoning of the optimists lies the usual faith in the self-correcting ability of markets. They stress that global financial integration and deregulation have reduced the dependence of national economies on national savings. Wider current account deficits and surpluses have become the new norm — even calling them “imbalances” is a misnomer. According to Cooper, “The startlingly large US CAD is not only sustainable but a natural feature of today's highly globalized economy”.

The alarmists recall moments of “market failure” like the 1987 stockmarket crash and the 1997-98 Asian crisis. They point out that there's no way that the present global imbalances can be unwound without a substantial depreciation of the US dollar (at least by 30%), especially considering that to eliminate its CAD through higher exports alone, US export revenue would have to increase by 60% over 2005 levels.

Former IMF deputy managing director Stanley Fischer argues that such a devaluation is possible without disaster if “instead of happening overnight, it happens over a period of years... In support of that I'd say that it's pretty remarkable that for two major currencies — the dollar and the euro — between 2002 and 2004, the exchange rate moved 30%.”

Of course, the custodians of the system aren't just speculating about the future — they are putting forward measures to avoid the Armageddon scenario. The economic and political impact of these — including on Australia — will be taken up in the last article in this series.

[Dick Nichols is the managing editor of Seeing Red. For sources used in this article contact <dicknichols@greenleft.org.au>.]

From Green Left Weekly, July 5, 2006.
Visit the Green Left Weekly home page.


Source: [[Green Left - Issues: Global imbalances and the Australian economy|http://www.greenleft.org.au/2006/674/6283]]
Permaculture and Marxism

Barry Healy
14 July 2007


It is often thought that concern for the interconnection of living systems is a modern development. But Karl Marx’s talked about it repeatedly throughout his Capital.

Marx didn’t use the word “ecology” — it was coined in 1866 — but metabolism . He argued that capitalist accumulation shatters basic processes of ecological sustainability “by destroying the circumstances surrounding [natural] metabolism”. Marx called this “metabolic rift”. So, he said, what is needed is the “systematic restoration [of natural metabolism] as a regulating law of social reproduction”.

In other words: farming and other productive activities have to restore the ecological balance, and this can only really be achieved under a system where people and the environment come before profits — socialism.

Australian-developed permaculture farming principles aim at restoring this balance. Within capitalist Australia, permaculture remains a fringe movement. But in socialist Cuba, it has become mainstream. Viewers of the inspiring film The Power of Community can see with their own eyes the depth of meaning that Marx attached to “healing the metabolic rift”. It is a physical healing of the land, combined with a spiritual rejuvenation of human society.

As Roz Paterson and Jack Ferguson reported in the May 25 Scottish Socialist Voice: “In the 1990s, Cuba made the transition from an industrial society, where farming was conducted on a massive scale, with a heavy reliance on fossil fuel-based pesticides and fertilisers, to a sustainable one, with a food economy based on small organic farms, workers’ co-operatives and urban gardens.”

In Havana, more than 90% of perishable produce is grown within or near the city limits. “Nowadays”, Paterson and Ferguson explained, “while the children of much richer nations begin to fall prey to diet-related diseases we thought we’d seen the back of, such as malnutrition and rickets, as well as life-shrinking levels of obesity, and at a time when we’re throwing away a third of all the food we buy, Cubans are chowing down on the kind of food we can only aspire to — local, organic, fresh — and learning to waste nothing”.

The SSV reported that instead of artificial fertilisers, Cuban farmers use micro-organisms that enrich the soil, earthworms, compost, animal and green manure, and the integration of grazing livestock.

Unfortunately, Australian agribusiness treats the soil like dirt. Similar to using the earth as a hydroponic growth medium, synthetic fertilisers and pesticides are flung around and water pumped through. Farmers who resist these trends are subjected to financial pressure; meanwhile the soil turns acidic and the rivers choke with algae.

Another concern for Marx was the struggle over the Corn Laws, which between 1815 and 1846 were tariffs protecting rich British farmers against foreign competition. Manchester-based industrialists successfully overturned the laws to reduce the amount that they had to pay in wages.

The factory bosses knew that keeping food cheap helps keep wages low. The “reproduction” of labour means workers have to arrive at work with enough food in their bellies to create surplus value for the boss. Cheapening food means that bosses can drive wages down towards a minimum sustenance level.

But cheap food isn’t always good food: often it isn’t really food at all. In Marx’s day, cheap workers’ bread contained stone dust, chalk, pearl ashes, soap and other such choice items. In Capital, Marx quoted testimony to the 1855 parliamentary inquiry into food adulteration that, because of contamination, “the poor men who lived on two pounds of bread a day did not take in one fourth of that amount of nutrition”.

The modern equivalent of such contamination is food colourings and other additives. Eric Schlosser’s Fast Food Nation gives the 50 or so ingredients that constitute the typical artificial strawberry flavour.

The artificial flavour industry took off in the 1950s, when the gas chromatograph and mass spectrometers were invented, allowing the detection of gases in minute quantities. This allowed for tiny amounts of odour and colour to be attached to questionable foods.

We can often tell whether food is fresh or stale by its colour, odour or taste. But artificial additives disguise this. What was ground up rock to our great grandparents is today the mystifying list of numbers on labels. The modern equivalent to the factory owners’ victory over the Corn Laws is our cheap, mass-produced “food” — the modern McDiet.

As a marginal product in Australia, organic food is a little more expensive. But its price shows the real cost of producing authentic food. The artificial number soup slopped out by the Australian food industry simply isn’t worth eating.

From: Comment & Analysis, Green Left Weekly issue #717 18 July 2007.

Source: [[Green Left - Permaculture and Marxism|http://www.greenleft.org.au/2007/717/37245]]
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Comment and trackback support for TiddlyWiki (via Haloscan).

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* 31-Jan-06, version 1.0.1, fixed display of counts for default tiddlers
* 30-Jan-06, version 1.0, initial release

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Hauling Cargo by Bike

Most people underestimate how much they can transport using their own muscle power. With the right equipment, it is easy to move loads too large for an automobile.
hauling an old refrigerator on a bike and trailer
Hauling an old refrigerator

    * Why Transport Cargo by Bike? - The benefits of using human-powered vehicles to move cargo
    * How Much Can I Haul? - A look at what is physically possible. Includes a calculator.
    * How to Measure Grade - A simple method of measuring the slope of a hill.
    * Gearing and Gear Inches - Good gearing is critical to hauling heavy loads. This examines the subject in some detail. Includes some formulas for calculating gear ratios.
    * Bicycle Trailer Guide - What to look for when purchasing or building a bicycle cargo trailer
    * Moving a Household by Bike - Some examples and tips
    * Moving a Refrigerator by Bike - Easier to do than it might first appear. Here's a case study using two refrigerators.

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Source: [[Hauling Cargo by Bike|http://www.bikesatwork.com/hauling-cargo-by-bike/]]
How our Homes became the Equivalent of a Hummer
December 3, 2007 · 6 Comments

    “In 1946, when the American post war housing boom started, the average house was 1100 square feet and housed 5 people. Fifty years latter, in 1996 the average house would grow to 2200 square feet and house 2.6 people and by 2007, fueled by easy credit, the average American home would would become the equivalent of a Hummer, “weighing in” at super-sized 2,400 square feet.”

In 1934, during the depths of the Depression, Congress passed the National Housing Act to strengthen a deeply troubled housing market. This act created the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) which was amended in 1938 to create the Federal National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae) – an entity designed to help mortgage lenders gain access to capital for mortgage loans. An important element of this legislation was to make mortgage funds available to more Americans by protecting lenders from the risk of default. In its earliest days, Fannie Mae nationalized the mortgage industry by creating the first mechanism in America for selling individual mortgages (backed the U.S. government) into a secondary market.

When the FHA and Fannie Mae were created, the housing industry was flat on its back:

    * Two million construction workers had lost their jobs.
    * Housing finance was a fragmented, inefficient and illiquid. Mortgage rates varied considerably from region to region. In some economically distressed regions there were simply no funds available.
    * Terms were very difficult to meet for homebuyers seeking mortgages.
    * Lending institutions would issue a mortgage, collect payments, and file the mortgage away until the principal was paid off. A lack of available, consistently priced capital put a hard ceiling on the number of new mortgages that could be issued.
    * Mortgage loan terms were limited to 50 percent of the property’s market value. Borrower’s were faced with a 50% down payment and a repayment schedule spread over three to five years and ending with a large balloon payment.
    * America was primarily a nation of renters. Only four in 10 households owned homes.
    * Homes were NOT considered as investments and refi’s and equity withdrawals were extremely rare.

In the 1940’s after WWII, the FHA and the GI Bill helped finance millions of homes for returning veterans and their families. This post war period would mark the peak of American economic dominance. We were still the world’s major oil producer AND exporter and due to the devastation of the European manufacturing base, we dominated the world in virtually every industrial and manufacturing sector.

Fueled by cheap and abundant fossil fuel energy, this period would also mark the beginning of an American landscape built around the automobile and the “American (suburban) Dream”. These were “heady” times and the freedom of movement afforded by the automobile combined with affordable housing for millions of returning GI’s would prove seductive. We would build cars and homes as if the gasoline, natural gas, fuel oil, and electricity that made driving and comfortable home dwelling possible would be cheap and abundant forever. The big lumbering gas guzzling V8’s of the forties and fifties would be driven home to the energy guzzling, thinly insulated, drafty homes of a new suburbia. The cars would last about 5 five years. The homes however would last an average of 75 years.

 

In 1946, when the American post war housing boom started, the average house was 1100 square feet and housed 5 people. Fifty years latter, in 1996 the average house would grow to 2200 square feet and house 2.6 people and by 2007, fueled by easy credit, the average American home would would become the equivalent of a Hummer, “weighing in” at super-sized 2,400 square feet. The peaking of U.S. oil production in 1971, the formation of OPEC in 1973 and the associated energy crisis’ of the 1970’s would force much needed improvements in our building codes. However, today’s homes are still grossly under-insulated and 1/3 of their energy losses are still the result of air leaks through poorly constructed exterior walls! Our home energy standards are possibly worse than our car and truck CAFE standards (federal mileage requirements).  Look underneath the hood of our homes and you’ll 500 HP, super charged forced air furnaces lumbering away in our basements and holding the cold at bay with the brute force of natural gas and oil. We are still behaving as if cheap energy sources are forever.

Adding to the problem is the current culture of “homes as investments” and average ownership cycles of only 5 years. We are a culture with a myopic time horizon where granite countertops, super-sized floorplans, and home-equity financed SUV’s trump energy efficiency and solar hot water systems. This “housing bubble” culture may soon be going the way of the dinosaur with the fall of the sub-prime loan market, the collapse of Wall Street’s sleazy and toxic secondary market for home mortgages, and the first serious decline in home values since the great depression. However, the final death blow will come with the peaking of fossil fuel production, fuel shortages, blackouts, and the obvious and urgent need to transform our housing stock into some semblance of energy efficiency.

Source: [[How our Homes became the Equivalent of a Hummer « The Sustainable Home Blog|http://sunhomedesign.wordpress.com/2007/12/03/how-our-homes-became-the-equivalent-of-gas-guzzling-hummers/]]
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src="http://www.instructables.com/files/deriv/FJH/LGUA/WZOES9J6BAU/FJHLGUAWZOES9J6BAU.TINY.jpg" alt=""></a></div><div class="tooltipByID ttid_ENZWEQI7QIES9J6CRO"><a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/ENZWEQI7QIES9J6CRO/"><span>step 7</span><img src="http://www.instructables.com/files/deriv/FKJ/FXKK/7GDES9J6B9G/FKJFXKK7GDES9J6B9G.TINY.jpg" alt=""></a></div><div class="tooltipByID ttid_EFR1W9R7QTES9J6CS6"><a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/EFR1W9R7QTES9J6CS6/"><span>step 8</span><img src="http://www.instructables.com/static/defaultIMG/default.TINY.gif" alt=""></a></div><div class="tooltipByID ttid_EQZZOF1CYSES9J6CST"><a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/EQZZOF1CYSES9J6CST/"><span>step 9</span><img src="http://www.instructables.com/files/deriv/F5Q/FWIM/MKJES9J6B8R/F5QFWIMMKJES9J6B8R.TINY.jpg" alt=""></a></div><div class="tooltipByID ttid_EHPC0GML5AES9J6CTV"><a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/EHPC0GML5AES9J6CTV/"><span>step 10</span><img 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<div><span class="stepLabel" style="padding-right: 5px;">intro</span><span class="stepTitle">How to Build Up a Bike</span></div>This
is a guide to building up a bike from parts. It should help you get the
parts and tools you need to get you pedalling along in no time. It
assumes that you have tinkered with your bike, but are not an expert.
Hope it helps! <br>
<br>
-Joe</html>
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/***
|Name:|LessBackupsPlugin|
|Description:|Intelligently limit the number of backup files you create|
|Version:|3.0 ($Rev: 2320 $)|
|Date:|$Date: 2007-06-18 22:37:46 +1000 (Mon, 18 Jun 2007) $|
|Source:|http://mptw.tiddlyspot.com/#LessBackupsPlugin|
|Author:|Simon Baird|
|Email:|simon.baird@gmail.com|
|License:|http://mptw.tiddlyspot.com/#TheBSDLicense|
!!Description
You end up with just backup one per year, per month, per weekday, per hour, minute, and second.  So total number won't exceed about 200 or so. Can be reduced by commenting out the seconds/minutes/hours line from modes array
!!Notes
Works in IE and Firefox only.  Algorithm by Daniel Baird. IE specific code by by Saq Imtiaz.
***/
//{{{
window.getSpecialBackupPath = function(backupPath) {

	var MINS  = 60 * 1000;
	var HOURS = 60 * MINS;
	var DAYS  = 24 * HOURS;

	// comment out the ones you don't want
	var modes = [
		["YYYY",  365*DAYS], // one per year for ever
		["MMM",   31*DAYS],  // one per month
			["latest",0]         // always keep last version. (leave this).
	];

	var now = new Date();

	for (var i=0;i<modes.length;i++) {

		// the filename we will try
		var specialBackupPath = backupPath.replace(/(\.)([0-9]+\.[0-9]+)(\.html)$/,
				'$1'+now.formatString(modes[i][0]).toLowerCase()+'$3')

		// open the file
		try {
			if (config.browser.isIE) {
				var fsobject = new ActiveXObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
				var fileExists  = fsobject.FileExists(specialBackupPath);
				if (fileExists) {
					var fileObject = fsobject.GetFile(specialBackupPath);
					var modDate = new Date(fileObject.DateLastModified).valueOf();
				}
			}
			else {
				netscape.security.PrivilegeManager.enablePrivilege("UniversalXPConnect");
				var file = Components.classes["@mozilla.org/file/local;1"].createInstance(Components.interfaces.nsILocalFile);
				file.initWithPath(specialBackupPath);
				var fileExists = file.exists();
				if (fileExists) {
					var modDate = file.lastModifiedTime;
				}
			}
		}
		catch(e) {
			// give up
			return backupPath;
		}

		// expiry is used to tell if it's an 'old' one. Eg, if the month is June and there is a
		// June file on disk that's more than an month old then it must be stale so overwrite
		// note that "latest" should be always written because the expiration period is zero (see above)
		var expiry = new Date(modDate + modes[i][1]);
		if (!fileExists || now > expiry)
			return specialBackupPath;
	}
}

// hijack the core function
window.getBackupPath_mptw_orig = window.getBackupPath;
window.getBackupPath = function(localPath) {
	return getSpecialBackupPath(getBackupPath_mptw_orig(localPath));
}

//}}}

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<html><h2 class="r">A selection of those published in <span style="font-style: italic;">Green Left Weekly</span></h2><br><br><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/154/9148" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','1','AFQjCNFCH522FIKQoFKnBfwN8kGpdknCUA','&sig2=eU_rh7A_V23sPpK3FsLW2w')">&nbsp;<b>Life of Riley</b>: Party On, <b>Dave</b>.</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">REGULAR FEATURE. <b>Life of Riley</b>: Party On, <b>Dave</b>. 10 August 1994 <b>...</b> For a  time we each embrace social <b>life</b> in a big way. There's nothing wrong with that <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1994/154/9148 - 16k </span><nobr><span class="bl"></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/167/8441" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','2','AFQjCNFzYlsVxdlserjoJ23MfR75Z1exgw','&sig2=jShYQY_c1076O4RnP3g7lw')">&nbsp;<b>Life of Riley</b>: Politics for beginners</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: Politics for beginners. 16 November 1994. Politics for beginners. By <b>Dave Riley</b>. The way Graham Richardson calls it, politics is  a mug's game <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1994/167/8441 - 17k -</span><nobr><span class="bl"></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/300/15351" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','3','AFQjCNGPvg41Jfyj3-OyekUuR6adoGX-sA','&sig2=JdFw65d5syeyM0brroBXXw')">&nbsp;<b>Life of Riley</b>: What's in a <b>life</b>?</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Isn't that the publication <b>Dave Riley</b> writes for?” There are people out there who buy it <b>...</b> Living the <b>life of Riley</b> isn't all that it's cracked up to be. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/300/15351 - 17k - </span><nobr><span class="bl"></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/207/11024" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','4','AFQjCNFwf482d7CW7j8kUwrgNmRvyg0KGA','&sig2=hrnLMVl9pQSh38mnIwWLgg')">&nbsp;<b>Life of Riley</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Once there you should be set for <b>life</b>. But despite your immense talent and <b>...</b> <b>Dave Riley</b> Á. From: Cultural Dissent, Green Left Weekly issue #207 17 October <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1995/207/11024 - 15k - </span><nobr><span class="bl"></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/258/12818" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','5','AFQjCNGtwk8ufT_Vi3cIfgPJ2eOvNBJjqQ','&sig2=vKhKKd1bly2KEcyLzhLutQ')">&nbsp;<b>Life of Riley</b>: Christmas Classifieds</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Message reads: COME BACK KARL! WE STILL HAVE A WORLD TO WIN! <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> <b>Life of Riley</b>: Christmas Class... Looking out: Deaths in custody. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/258/12818 - 21k - </span><nobr><span class="bl"></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/242/13770" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','6','AFQjCNHb-iSsR37QVpcgvS_aDheiVi0h-w','&sig2=Oe3UFgY-X1m2n6lCuN8nPg')">&nbsp;<b>Life of Riley</b>: It's over and done with</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Relieved. Relieved, Mr <b>Riley</b>? -- Voided of excrement, Sir. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> <b>Life of</b> <b>Riley</b>: It's over and d... Looking out: White Power! <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/242/13770 - 21k - </span><nobr><span class="bl"></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/211/10794" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','7','AFQjCNHSzfOC-4cqKSGE0rHxteP8BwFyTw','&sig2=v026RM2ZIKWEucFEJ6zlKQ')">&nbsp;<b>Life of Riley</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">If you want to get ahead in <b>life</b> it is a bequest you need. The fruits of someone's mortal toil <b>...</b> I don't feel guilty. I'm just a lucky bastard. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1995/211/10794 - 15k - </span><nobr><span class="bl"></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/158/8937" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','8','AFQjCNFZ6GTuHwTiEhaUobvhrO4myNOuWw','&sig2=wMtyL6PMD9-MmVa2McN2Sg')">&nbsp;<b>Life of Riley</b>: When RJ Hawke did Woodstock</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">By <b>Dave Riley</b>. There he was on stage, gigging away after Jimmy Hendrix. <b>...</b> Lenin Rests; <b>Life of Riley</b>: When RJ Hawke... Long live the Revolution! <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1994/158/8937 - 21k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:b5ruxrnCTWEJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/158/8937+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=8">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/158/8937">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=0&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/158/8937')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/293/15785" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','9','AFQjCNHENqpyiGaW6JAhX5lAFSImIxrAdQ','&sig2=dm5WGsvyFaDaYWpRu-le6Q')">&nbsp;<b>Life of Riley</b>: My holiday</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">God, I'm good!” That's  the day I flew home. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> <b>Life of Riley</b>: My holiday; Looking out: Practising on me; Loose cannons; Native title rally <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/293/15785 - 23k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:zfaQ5mBTDy0J:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/293/15785+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=9">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/293/15785">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=0&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/293/15785')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/213/10712" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','10','AFQjCNEqg8TWCqriILohW6Rrl1Oir45_6w','&sig2=9oONRX5fpLdFr5RipZVprw')">- <b>Life of Riley</b></a></h2><font size="-1"><b>...</b> by drawing pleasure and sustenance from the slaughter, and once dead, eat them. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Interesting instrumentation; <b>Life of Riley</b>; On the Box <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1995/213/10712 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:AfRYbrhJRgoJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/213/10712+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=10">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/213/10712">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=0&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/213/10712')">Note this</a><br></span></nobr></font><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/215/10605" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','11','AFQjCNEsKA92bdE1WNvGhNh3-6WuuBNVvQ','&sig2=aUihlwyk8zlxTeUrQAKE0Q')">- <b>Life of Riley</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Bookmark | Print. Home » 1995 » #215 » Cultural Dissent » <b>Life of Riley</b> <b>...</b> owned -- we have no alternative but to take our vandalism seriously! <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.green</span></font>
      <h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/144/9695" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','12','AFQjCNH0s-jfFS3ajGZpVtc7fjdSXE_4Pg','&sig2=JwdrLN7j6aPyu4EeeI7eUA')">Green Left - The <b>life of Riley</b>: Help wanted</a></h2>
      <font size="-1"><span class="a">left.org.au/1995/215/10605 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:6DBaMCl1XAQJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/215/10605+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=11">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/215/10605">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=10&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/215/10605')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1994 » #144 » General » The <b>life of Riley</b>: Help wanted <b>...</b> This country cannot survive if its youth insist on bypassing the dole.” ... <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1994/144/9695 - 21k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:uptT6kDE0HMJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/144/9695+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=12">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/144/9695">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=10&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/144/9695')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/250/13306" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','13','AFQjCNEurs-qhgbbIQuTWUnnTzWxQtnI_A','&sig2=KRCDAXrMsmwnf5mD81GrWQ')">Green Left - <b>Life of Riley</b>: Buying back the farm</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Beside the small Buddhist shrine at the door, we'll keep a <b>life</b>-sized cut-out of Jimmy <b>...</b>  We're buying back the farm from the likes of you. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/250/13306 - 22k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:UrIAxynsJUcJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/250/13306+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=13">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/250/13306">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=10&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/250/13306')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/209/10913" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','14','AFQjCNG4o-uhSIYkIJRkPfJuPB98IhPXvg','&sig2=DUYdavtUmVryY_5zzpwQpg')">Green Left - <b>Life of riley</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">(And even that was purchased from Myers!) <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> <b>Life of riley</b>; On the Box; Politics in a land of discours... Radio highlights; Redressing the <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1995/209/10913 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:MHTHEulwefEJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/209/10913+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=14">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/209/10913">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=10&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/209/10913')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/201/11240" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','15','AFQjCNFO26p9zu17HRmIP5FnVylejR5ptQ','&sig2=GqYcaT30kgcx2viBvTSxNQ')">Green Left - <b>Life of Riley</b>: The discreet charm of bosses</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1995 » #201 » Cultural Dissent » <b>Life of Riley</b>: The discreet <b>...</b> <b>Dave Riley</b>. From: Cultural Dissent, Green Left Weekly issue #201 6 September 1995. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1995/201/11240 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:QAutLbpLy5cJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/201/11240+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=15">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/201/11240">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=10&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/201/11240')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/197/11491" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','16','AFQjCNESiv699lT3VTOSuBa0Aw2Vp_HsdA','&sig2=Cny1zfsIbNqAAgHVpTCMXQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Bookmark | Print. Home » 1995 » #197 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b> <b>...</b> “Well, to us then. Here's to Punch and Judy.” “To us.” <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1995/197/11491 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:uyPWY1gBEmwJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/197/11491+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=16">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/197/11491">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=10&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/197/11491')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/317/21334" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','17','AFQjCNHvBvR_GHWcyaCKJPW03jTBKXtddw','&sig2=Z2ZbWLnn1VOhDSKQ3kdmfg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Regarding the last 30 <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1998 » #317 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Regarding the last 30 years <b>...</b> What? Someone like you? I wouldn't dare. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/317/21334 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:ysjDq_ls9qYJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/317/21334+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=17">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/317/21334">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=10&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/317/21334')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/328/20621" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','18','AFQjCNHqtkNmBTnxRpSFdOKKO-BDB61ECA','&sig2=wcVP6P9dWdGzu4moqHAPVw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: A time of reckoning</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Then followed, in quick succession, the <b>Life of Riley</b> web page and <b>...</b> So I said: “<b>Dave</b>, you've had a good innings. Maybe it's time you  stepped aside?” <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/328/20621 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:9TwbqJXnvRMJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/328/20621+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=18">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/328/20621">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=10&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/328/20621')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/240/13922" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','19','AFQjCNGpOrxYWAVJf_8KrnB94pGe3O3hGA','&sig2=oSgeEaD2tSf3AZeOYHBm3Q')">Green Left - <b>Life of Riley</b>: The Olympic spirit</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1996 » #240 » Cultural Dissent » <b>Life of Riley</b>: The Olympic spirit <b>...</b> does not -- and from all accounts, should not -- extend that far. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/240/13922 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:H2UU3KKOKbIJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/240/13922+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=19">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/240/13922">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=10&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/240/13922')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/383/18195" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','20','AFQjCNEiVQQFQtmBLESlSNCwzUynjOzPGg','&sig2=o-ldi_wkHyR7umsl19glrQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Living on my Reillys <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">By <b>Dave Riley</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose ... Regular Feature: On the. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/383/18195 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:038e__867B8J:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/383/18195+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=20">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/383/18195">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=10&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/383/18195')">Note this</a><br></span></nobr></font><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/146/9524" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','21','AFQjCNGtBLnxvnn6vmxeFiAe0rdtn-bNVA','&sig2=oDLvCaerEGuhe5EJ6JcRsQ')">n Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: <b>Riley</b> Inc</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Riley</b> Inc. By <b>Dave Riley</b>. Are you concerned about social issues and corporate <b>...</b> Stop being an anonymous statistic by turning your <b>life</b> into  a ledger. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1994/146/9524 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:QRGfTAhAWlIJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/146/9524+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=21">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/146/9524">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=20&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/146/9524')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/411/23324" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','22','AFQjCNG79DF5VSwAgwL5pwfLoqRjv4r3uw','&sig2=zE695kvkvS2WmPchC-sagw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: How about that!</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">It's the building block of  <b>life</b>. Something like Leggo, really -- you put it all together and make <b>life</b> <b>...</b> BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b> &lt;http://www.ozemail.com.au/~dhell&gt; <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/411/23324 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:_rffiMPYZlQJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/411/23324+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=22">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/411/23324">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=20&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/411/23324')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/414/23140" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','23','AFQjCNHM1BqA1vdyMjamlPDu9737xDb_tA','&sig2=U0jU0_TUgJm_NtfgvjEriw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The magic carpet</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">We at <b>Life of Riley</b> Enterprises are much distressed to hear such talk. <b>...</b> Credit cards accepted. <b>Dave Riley</b> &lt;http://www.ozemail.com.au/~dhell&gt; <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/414/23140 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:GjNysWbDEs8J:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/414/23140+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=23">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/414/23140">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=20&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/414/23140')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/337/20118" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','24','AFQjCNFp-12m7-ggBzALAhOaoh1Bam-THg','&sig2=-5oJp_sOCmg0FRmCQg7x0Q')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Spit the dummy, why <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1998 » #337 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Spit the dummy, <b>...</b> out there that we have just begun to feel cynical about. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/337/20118 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:OgQmM6V1FrYJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/337/20118+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=24">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/337/20118">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=20&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/337/20118')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/269/17251" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','25','AFQjCNGLaD6XIxjjKHlUubzVjWsgVQGS8Q','&sig2=SyRGrTfrx3Svr-nIbsW4vg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Tummy trouble</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">I am referring  of course to LORES -- the <b>Life of Riley</b> Enjoyment Service. Here's how it happened. <b>...</b> By  <b>Dave Riley</b>. e-mail: dhell@ozemail.com.au <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/269/17251 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:eq7bSDc4-n0J:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/269/17251+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=25">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/269/17251">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=20&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/269/17251')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/426/22438" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','26','AFQjCNG5BRklTZNiHAoZKA9zuPOQaO8q7g','&sig2=POWVzGyc3KkwctX4cjiyjg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Thwack!</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt;. From: Archives, Green Left Weekly issue #426 1 November 2000. <b>...</b>  Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/426/22438 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:Tb41Mto1KZMJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/426/22438+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=26">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/426/22438">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=20&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/426/22438')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/370/18349" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','27','AFQjCNHKkKIEQTN6bOno-yFv4NRQW7wzvg','&sig2=l4CcAQZeCv8oP-pN_dsezA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Let's hear it for <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Indeed, <b>Life of Riley</b> Enterprises would like to go on record with its <b>...</b> I can only respect them for their guts and marvel at their success. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/370/18349 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:7DYuiLIqYCUJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/370/18349+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=27">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/370/18349">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=20&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/370/18349')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/419/22867" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','28','AFQjCNGwFFqNPafEIiIJNZj5R1GyEFt-sw','&sig2=vGMmZUOe0V1KMgfqrzw85A')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: This little piggy <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b> &lt;http://www.ozemail.com.au/~dhell&gt;. From: Archives,  Green Left Weekly issue #419 6 <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/419/22867 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:BvRKLhuJfLQJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/419/22867+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=28">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/419/22867">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=20&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/419/22867')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/412/23280" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','29','AFQjCNEDY5Ajwd2np6QPPQwUSORVBvd-nQ','&sig2=ATEuJ-sTgoDpjijvrouNGA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: At last, the 1901 show</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">I can't hear it? ARE WE HAPPY? You bet we are. BY <b>DAVE</b> <b>RILEY</b> &lt;http://www.ozemail.com.au/~dhell&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/412/23280 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:WDCOuQymnGUJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/412/23280+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=29">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/412/23280">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=20&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/412/23280')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/338/20059" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','30','AFQjCNE2SzXDPbDoxL3iYXt5aWJIOjfLcw','&sig2=AwGz-GIB8X5Tv_soWznPNg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Honourable intentions</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1998 » #338 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Honourable <b>...</b> and you know what he did? -- Sorry. He burnt it down! By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/338/20059 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:jAbZCIa0JWYJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/338/20059+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=30">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/338/20059">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=20&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/338/20059')">Note this</a><br></span></nobr></font><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/264/17578" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','31','AFQjCNFoM7_D3w1CNN6mlrUal3kQYyR4oQ','&sig2=grdKdX4OzcFf1-q-0nprQg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Stiff bickies</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: Stiff bickies. The Arnott's extortion attempt has hit the innocent hardest: the company, <b>...</b> By <b>Dave Riley</b> (E-mail: dhell@ozemail.com.au) <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/264/17578 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:5czd0fUMui0J:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/264/17578+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=31">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/264/17578">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=30&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/264/17578')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/248/13387" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','32','AFQjCNHgLyuQEVXVoFW3mi3y7kE2_ZlS8g','&sig2=qMPxGiJZzfiTt98lZXSdbg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: How about <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: How about terminations for telephones? 25 September 1996 <b>...</b> You never know, but maybe I can get it for you wholesale! <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/248/13387 - 18k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:d96naOvccT4J:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/248/13387+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=32">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/248/13387">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=30&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/248/13387')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/401/23921" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','33','AFQjCNFpXL4Uv4Efz9AP5cdnUiEe8K7pGA','&sig2=8LTVpOTxwd5rfeONB10t6g')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: A faux pas</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">“No siree: you've lived the <b>life of Riley</b>. You were  taken from harm's way and brought up proper. <b>...</b> BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt; <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/401/23921 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:TCRDcJXTyNQJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/401/23921+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=33">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/401/23921">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=30&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/401/23921')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/251/13245" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','34','AFQjCNHKpucVP2S_J5AfGDxLrDRENj2lJg','&sig2=4CV9zyIZXLSmE-ThM92Yhw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The August 19th movement</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1996 » #251 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The <b>...</b> Both your houses are infected with gratuity, so a plague on both of them. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/251/13245 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:soG0uE0qpRwJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/251/13245+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=34">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/251/13245">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=30&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/251/13245')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/427/22388" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','35','AFQjCNGgeb05mEnCOHSJsBO6TDpwwRtT4A','&sig2=_j4u9DBwP33VzuSz3e0w-w')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: DOGS</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: DOGS. 8 November 2000 <b>...</b> BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b> &lt;http://www.ozemail.com.<wbr>au/~dhell&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/427/22388 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:LjTpGCtI3gcJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/427/22388+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=35">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/427/22388">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=30&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/427/22388')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/199/11341" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','36','AFQjCNEfivd5BrcLUELRnfKZb3sK-4Db_g','&sig2=oNMFScFY5__RqZCoOwzg4g')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">He swore an oath to devote his <b>life</b> to the destruction of cruelty and injustice. <b>...</b> By the banks of yon Merri Creek will begin my feat.” <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1995/199/11341 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:a1OwRAMOqtEJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/199/11341+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=36">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/199/11341">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=30&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/199/11341')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/422/22699" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','37','AFQjCNEs13JxY268Ujh2vs5L4RsF-MNJMg','&sig2=B4HfLBUG5gtY4Auspelglw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Mates always</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b> &lt;http://www.ozemail.com.au/~dhell&gt;. From: Archives,  Green Left Weekly issue #422 27 <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Loose . <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/422/22699 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:6DnmZ6fJmR8J:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/422/22699+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=37">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/422/22699">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=30&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/422/22699')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/413/23208" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','38','AFQjCNHufENf3w_HRLo9eyi9ccTm1niUrg','&sig2=ZxLIC1rSDsxKx2aKfEYv-A')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Memo -- Re: Globalisation</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">So who gives a stuff, if over there gets it tougher than we get it over here. It's relative. That's <b>life</b>. Fortunately's it not ours. BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/413/23208 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:8GY8MZDYfRUJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/413/23208+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=38">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/413/23208">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=30&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/413/23208')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/404/23784" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','39','AFQjCNG-yy6rODG5d6RusF4pne3lj9BseQ','&sig2=R1yAfDQPfu2F5QWwcJum6w')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Elian, the <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Do it! The bogyman's here. (Don't tell him it's his dad.) By <b>Dave</b> <b>Riley</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/404/23784 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:AW2cufD4mEIJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/404/23784+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=39">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/404/23784">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=30&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/404/23784')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/278/16720" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','40','AFQjCNGpZdGidPBU1NEqvgABvqENO_I7hA','&sig2=Ps7m8LlSTeTYOlJJ4oduOQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Identity</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Today is the first day of the rest of my <b>life</b>. I mean that. I am determined to become the person I always wanted <b>...</b> <b>Dave Riley</b>. E-mail:dhell@ozemail.com.au <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/278/16720 - 18k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:cdo7pgDO5M8J:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/278/16720+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=40">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/278/16720">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=30&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/278/16720')">Note this</a><br></span></nobr></font><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/282/16478" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','41','AFQjCNHKtJrhhQ2r8naIxKSfrSu4rjP8xQ','&sig2=whPA2qLUbFl3shgxfDDe0w')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Professional foot <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life</b> can be bitter. Did you ever notice how easily the amateur can eclipse the good standing of an industrious <b>...</b> <b>Dave Riley</b> Email: dhell@ozemail.com.au <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/282/16478 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:bF8QyKNUeJgJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/282/16478+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=41">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/282/16478">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=40&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/282/16478')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/364/18669" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','42','AFQjCNE9_-Qh48tFh5aePXUREObRcRzVdQ','&sig2=AlbwWQoVql3a6Xc2L8jSDA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Four years ... and <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">By <b>Dave Riley</b>. [To see a selection of past <b>Life of Riley</b> columns, visit the revamped Satire Workshop on the web at &lt;http://www.ozemail.com.au/~dhell&gt; and <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/364/18669 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:eewkI4tSmvMJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/364/18669+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=42">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/364/18669">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=40&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/364/18669')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/403/23793" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','43','AFQjCNF8KLeZPIBUK3tFKdCZ584ZK8qrZA','&sig2=SahJEYu4I0eZH7LENI6vmw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Winston and Kimbo <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Three years. No questions asked. BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose . <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/403/23793 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:8Ow2HiM-gygJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/403/23793+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=43">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/403/23793">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=40&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/403/23793')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/156/9037" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','44','AFQjCNGem4gc4xqRK1SVWdmn1Vfy_CsT0A','&sig2=tKjIOPzpumhI-aDHc_Bd5w')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1994 » #156 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b> <b>...</b> <b>Life of Riley</b>. 24 August 1994 <b>...</b> Now that's food for thought. ... <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1994/156/9037 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:WVPfL64scK0J:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/156/9037+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=44">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/156/9037">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=40&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/156/9037')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/270/17196" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','45','AFQjCNEPd1BD0FgQ4PfUeJ_6rlDEiBaLGw','&sig2=CWbdknAY6oADjTXAr61gjQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The age of usury</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">I, <b>David</b> J. <b>Riley</b> -- pin number: ******* -- rely on those financial encounters and <b>...</b> My  <b>life</b> depends on those transactions, Mr Wallis. (Fat lot you care! <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/270/17196 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:ow-fi1d26aIJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/270/17196+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=45">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/270/17196">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=40&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/270/17196')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/329/20611" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','46','AFQjCNGe_6sLC-qrkduMCxKmFXk8KQ-31A','&sig2=qOqfDPQ_xGQoj19n5SCsKg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Put One Nation last?</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>...</b> One Nation doesn't help a party much at all. It's not a ticket to sainthood you know. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/329/20611 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:YOx9Kw5o1v4J:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/329/20611+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=46">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/329/20611">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=40&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/329/20611')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/255/13005" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','47','AFQjCNFnZcrz3p3hcquQuGnoB0Jshzz-xQ','&sig2=juj6e0U5ZZy3W44bCjTCUg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Murder most foul</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">``Or me'', said the elected leader of the land downunder. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose . <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/255/13005 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:6I60pnxIVlwJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/255/13005+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=47">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/255/13005">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=40&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/255/13005')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/295/15657" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','48','AFQjCNGmMigHUKEmjq3qdcmaf5sskU-EOg','&sig2=8uM37KCAn8QPJfZDDzPxEQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Our greedy seniors</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1997 » #295 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Our greedy <b>...</b> as the vale-of-years  industry can get its hands on their money. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/295/15657 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:QUieQsVidZkJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/295/15657+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=48">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/295/15657">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=40&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/295/15657')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/405/23732" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','49','AFQjCNH8_EzFAc8Zp_qc9OhNIeChLqAheg','&sig2=A2ChlS_xCLi579EKzRM_nw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Nothing but air</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: Nothing but air. 17 May 2000 <b>...</b> By <b>Dave Riley</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/405/23732 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:jSI3VB7x0BIJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/405/23732+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=49">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/405/23732">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=40&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/405/23732')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/361/18820" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','50','AFQjCNHsOp8QXCpexirPtrW9k5DjA5uDCA','&sig2=xA3EDtruv7Y79aWmBmjA2A')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Stalag Kosova</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: Stalag Kosova. 19 May 1999 <b>...</b> It's your home away from home. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/361/18820 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:ojVWJJ6llBkJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/361/18820+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=50">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/361/18820">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=40&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/361/18820')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <!--z--><nobr><br><br></nobr><font size="-1"><nobr><span class="bl"></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <!--z--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/231/14389" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','51','AFQjCNH_aOCZ31Lq2erlVcnok0qQTtymPA','&sig2=nsTgPCgQRTotyaF-JZId4A')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Bookmark | Print. Home » 1996 » #231 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b> <b>...</b> safe in the knowledge that in future we can picnic in peace. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/231/14389 - 18k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:_CtzB69mfhUJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/231/14389+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=51">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/231/14389">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=50&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/231/14389')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/298/15490" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','52','AFQjCNFXvZ853ihWIbzx2LkgIionOzuiXg','&sig2=2qSOFQhl5yeSTMckoQhvaA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Mum</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">She never met an Aboriginal in her <b>life</b>. True. But no! Me mum can't see it like that. <b>...</b> She was joking, wasn't she? I hope so. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/298/15490 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:M9nP6_Rr14MJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/298/15490+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=52">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/298/15490">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=50&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/298/15490')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/320/21094" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','53','AFQjCNGUFeDBjlza1asM62l_TcNORK5-lw','&sig2=BQrUZTBSrO89QWaH7X8k5Q')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: To whom it may concern</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">I had to struggle hard and long all my <b>life</b> to come up with something interesting to say. <b>...</b> Maybe I have actually  said something profound? By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/320/21094 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:W230fgSVknkJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/320/21094+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=53">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/320/21094">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=50&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/320/21094')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/272/17073" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','54','AFQjCNFab0Kkg7anWAN6h4SKbInKXEQhgg','&sig2=qgsIs3do-ZXa6K3im089SA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Two legged eating</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">It is time we recognised and accepted as part of our way of <b>life</b> the cuisine for which this country was renowned <b>...</b> <b>Dave Riley</b> email: dhell@ozemail.com.au <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/272/17073 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:uQANMvVgyKAJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/272/17073+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=54">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/272/17073">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=50&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/272/17073')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/252/13152" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','55','AFQjCNGroRDgUlx-Ayrc8aebXHt10op20g','&sig2=0-8h1PAlQ8X8o5m7Gnm43g')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Entrance examination <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1996 » #252 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Entrance <b>...</b> lines you get to join the federal Coalition as a junior minister.) <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/252/13152 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:P41GThflYTgJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/252/13152+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=55">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/252/13152">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=50&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/252/13152')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/365/18618" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','56','AFQjCNHjDw1nd3uzBrIa-4lxKnyqGpHynA','&sig2=8ajjBqTWtca1M73czD_mrQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Dear diary,</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Do something else with your <b>life</b>! What? Other than answering nature's call? <b>...</b> But how do I do that? -- I'm sure you'll think of something. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/365/18618 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:pYNNaI0qJvYJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/365/18618+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=56">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/365/18618">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=50&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/365/18618')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/339/20015" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','57','AFQjCNGco8mScfDzHIhpqlKZ5aIjks7D-A','&sig2=VcVK1Og2nEITnzs4sngMcQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Aliens</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: Aliens. 3 November 1998 <b>...</b> So what's so foreign about that? By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/339/20015 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:znZnSq5MSOQJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/339/20015+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=57">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/339/20015">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=50&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/339/20015')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/366/18567" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','58','AFQjCNH8FE2rQcoO_Rxu9XXwco3gj-G3dQ','&sig2=4yF0RwMV6ZrpMIYtCwcuOg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Toot this and toot that</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">All I wanted out of <b>life</b> was my share of the happily ever afters. But now, I don't know.  Now, I've been tooted. Toot! Toot! <b>Dave</b>. Toot! Toot! By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/366/18567 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:YZLemRdavU4J:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/366/18567+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=58">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/366/18567">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=50&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/366/18567')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2001/434/26804" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','59','AFQjCNFZADT1wcJwUZux8ZpBQp4tDAHKHg','&sig2=XvGhBoFw__5B3uTijFdtIg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: A community service <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Get on with your <b>life</b>. So I don't need your consideration — or your hugs or <b>...</b> BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b>. From: Archives, Green Left Weekly issue #434 31 January 2001. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2001/434/26804 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:0BnpW7EwLuQJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2001/434/26804+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=59">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2001/434/26804">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=50&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2001/434/26804')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/189/11901" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','60','AFQjCNHd_-JJmA3pIuA1Uo1JCp4kkjbEiQ','&sig2=xU9B_yNOygiv5f6fDyZbBA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Time and motion</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">By <b>Dave Riley</b>. I'll tell you what enterprise bargaining is about -- consensus. <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1995/189/11901 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:I0DxAbisfPkJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/189/11901+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=60">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/189/11901">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=50&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/189/11901')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <!--z--><br clear="all"><table align="center" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="1%"><tbody><tr style="text-align: center;" align="center" valign="top"><td class="b" align="right" nowrap="nowrap"><a href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=40&amp;sa=N">Previous</a></td><td nowrap="nowrap"><a href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=0&amp;sa=N">1</a></td><td nowrap="nowrap"><a href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=10&amp;sa=N">2</a></td><td nowrap="nowrap"><a href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=20&amp;sa=N">3</a></td><td nowrap="nowrap"><a href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=30&amp;sa=N">4</a></td><td nowrap="nowrap"><a href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=40&amp;sa=N">5</a></td><td nowrap="nowrap"><span class="i">6</span></td><td nowrap="nowrap"><br></td></tr></tbody></table><nobr><br></nobr><font size="-1"><nobr><span class="bl"></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <!--z--><nobr><br></nobr><font size="-1"><nobr><span class="bl"></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <!--z--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/311/21677" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','61','AFQjCNEKtCPajwXT7arlYf7dUfSu__lMeg','&sig2=rRMnu_E0w9MF-fqeLLIjpA')">een Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: St Patrick and the <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1998 » #311 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: St Patrick <b>...</b> Such are the fruits of a share in a shamrock-owning society. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/311/21677 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:klJSLI_j9-0J:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/311/21677+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=61">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/311/21677">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=60&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/311/21677')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/418/22893" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','62','AFQjCNF4XDeH-TqSwPTQdm1DWA-RBfQ_Lg','&sig2=OCfc26uv2bTu8cwLbcL07Q')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Mal returns to form</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Indeed, after being awarded club <b>life</b> membership, it is hard to work out why he should suddenly change <b>...</b> BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b> &lt;http://www.ozemail.com.au/~dhell&gt;. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/418/22893 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:brz8oST-BfsJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/418/22893+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=62">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/418/22893">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=60&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/418/22893')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/286/16195" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','63','AFQjCNEHhXZtlnFbEEWQQUBTyEOkGjRawA','&sig2=2OAuS1z9CA-Dzn7amneqnA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Food and revolution</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1997 » #286 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Food and revolution <b>...</b> next week the bourgeoisie won't know what hit them. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/286/16195 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:yngUja3bengJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/286/16195+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=63">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/286/16195">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=60&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/286/16195')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/430/22259" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','64','AFQjCNFLcKYa8xqdXI1PuJ6AxLI-vlkbVA','&sig2=0jfi5YHysZvOEFqSDq36gQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Fleas</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: Fleas. 29 November 2000 <b>...</b> BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b> &lt;http://www.ozemail.<wbr>com.au/~dhell&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/430/22259 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:wQv2n0oXPlIJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/430/22259+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=64">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/430/22259">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=60&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/430/22259')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/257/12903" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','65','AFQjCNHRf4cpmatPxwNFEXnzB5pfBg_Ipw','&sig2=RWZMRLFKeMgLu5dCpL-T3Q')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Divided we fall</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: Divided we fall. If it seems to you that we never had so much, that is only the slogan <b>...</b> FIRST &amp; SECOND: Such is their right. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/257/12903 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:jD8pDurVYNMJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/257/12903+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=65">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/257/12903">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=60&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/257/12903')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/303/22119" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','66','AFQjCNGqQiWO0oUcohSyKx2s7pUY83olMg','&sig2=vGS18aiQzTuHRwS5EI6HDg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The pope knows</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">So it's true then? You betta believe it -- the pope's always right. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/303/22119 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:uCmQdvfcW-IJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/303/22119+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=66">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/303/22119">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=60&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/303/22119')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/266/17427" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','67','AFQjCNHJ77CFsz85XNcCkwF6KvpuiVC8GA','&sig2=AGhZEDk15QoAHhQyAXurPQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Have gun, will travel</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">When your <b>life</b> is on the line, you can't afford to kid yourself about what you are doing there. <b>...</b> <b>Dave Riley</b> E-mail: dhell@ozeamil.com.au <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/266/17427 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:u-RUC30v9YkJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/266/17427+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=67">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/266/17427">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=60&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/266/17427')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/332/20434" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','68','AFQjCNFHnALidks7mgW9cv1jwPlntaf8ug','&sig2=5hXCjVzAd0dn3Nws2v9Mdg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Best of all possible <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">But not at this election. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose ... Regular Feature: On the. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/332/20434 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:t1Jrzn0_ufEJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/332/20434+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=68">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/332/20434">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=60&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/332/20434')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/241/13856" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','69','AFQjCNFeQcCoDrFUABp6Xsjz_dAX8_bwgQ','&sig2=xOskUk3Q7vHRpI3JeCNEeQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Counting the dead reds</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: Counting the dead reds. 7 August 1996 <b>...</b> Terima Kasih (Thankyou). <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/241/13856 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:hkn1k5lrjDQJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/241/13856+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=69">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/241/13856">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=60&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/241/13856')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/417/22994" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','70','AFQjCNGWSV3MbTTxyGtzCIzsTT4RHKGTLA','&sig2=PEiSFFVIPQV7rPzrRC52MQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Every home should <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>...</b> honest to god family would introduce matinees. BY <b>DAVE</b> <b>RILEY</b> &lt;http://www.ozemail.com.au/~dhell&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Loose . <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/417/22994 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:5FLHGC6PSsMJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/417/22994+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=70">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/417/22994">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=60&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/417/22994')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <!--z--><nobr><br><br></nobr><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/305/22014" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','71','AFQjCNERZllMT6SjS_QUEfx_buj0edcsFQ','&sig2=TqwYL5y4imxhNmRwcpgs9Q')">reen Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: World's best  practice</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1998 » #305 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: World's <b>...</b> and under-worked so-and-so's, just like those greedy wharfies. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/305/22014 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:TlehyInFvbEJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/305/22014+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=71">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/305/22014">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=70&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/305/22014')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/299/15382" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','72','AFQjCNHElPWq7D3mwKaV3N08RU9vdXMUvA','&sig2=lvLEjV0s96C30b4gNg_2kw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Something for nothing</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1997 » #299 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Something <b>...</b> do with what we please -- and nobody is going to tell us otherwise. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/299/15382 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:pxbQCQIV8bIJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/299/15382+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=72">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/299/15382">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=70&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/299/15382')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/238/14025" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','73','AFQjCNHOeJRI57sp1Rq0pzuyLjRpW3eXrw','&sig2=kH7_S7lWZL4-TTvQXPUF4Q')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Learning to use the</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1996 » #238 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Learning to <b>...</b> And after you've finished chatting about it, let's get rid of it. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/238/14025 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:HY9K4zENtDUJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/238/14025+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=73">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/238/14025">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=70&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/238/14025')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/275/16907" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','74','AFQjCNE0pHKteCJna9XRh8xQPv1dIi8MNg','&sig2=5-S4EuQx0PVbeQZ7Pf_sVA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: What! Me worry?</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">By <b>Dave Riley</b> E-mail: dhell@ozemail.com.au. <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose ... Regular Feature: On the. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/275/16907 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:rhKn4SbuJ0oJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/275/16907+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=74">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/275/16907">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=70&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/275/16907')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/267/17408" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','75','AFQjCNHfhNY64E5E4wH9THrBJZwBDYd-sw','&sig2=VG7j4jPYtiPdKUiULuLdFw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Parliament: a  class act</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Bookmark | Print. Home » 1997 » #267 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Parliament: a  class act <b>...</b> By <b>Dave Riley</b> e-mail: dhell@ozemail.com.au <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/267/17408 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:seHi19a5tBcJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/267/17408+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=75">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/267/17408">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=70&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/267/17408')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2001/432/26934" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','76','AFQjCNFxKE5zPIyRb6ZKiwGT8IrBnP6rBQ','&sig2=CpM-BCoac88cFbXyh0PUUA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Best of all possible <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt;. From: Archives, Green Left Weekly issue #432 17 January 2001. <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2001/432/26934 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:bcq6h8jgQJcJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2001/432/26934+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=76">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2001/432/26934">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=70&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2001/432/26934')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/308/21817" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','77','AFQjCNEQjUPIz-2MO2ES0x5yQMLUe9XLSg','&sig2=BrnHRzvoxyqtvBvzBweXdQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Santa and me</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Saints preserve us! May we never see his like again. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Issues: <b>Life</b> at the vir... Issues: Putting women i... Issues: Students join t. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/308/21817 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:D-ct9t3xzFkJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/308/21817+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=77">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/308/21817">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=70&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/308/21817')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/150/9348" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','78','AFQjCNF-4OG2yyGCoAK2SSggW24-GofxYw','&sig2=tNpO6BMw5OL0BFrHrbRwOQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: The <b>life of Riley</b>: When George lit up</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1994 » #150 » Archives » Regular Feature: The <b>life of Riley</b>: When <b>...</b> he thought that all we disseminated was the cricket scores. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1994/150/9348 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:Q6tA1YLcigMJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/150/9348+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=78">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/150/9348">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=70&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/150/9348')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/335/20225" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','79','AFQjCNGXFK0W7UefayxiWaJvIzxu6AVcVw','&sig2=DeLFWtYp-0It3_EJ-DKYPA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Hero of true <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Following the return to political <b>life</b> of ARTHUR AUGUSTUS CALWELL, the election we are <b>...</b> “Trust me, I know. There's one born every minute.” By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/335/20225 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:hONFKDf6U94J:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/335/20225+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=79">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/335/20225">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=70&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/335/20225')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/342/19823" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','80','AFQjCNGqtpusTVWON_fpd8ZYM6211J01Cg','&sig2=f-kEGm9OnYulveVTvZVP2A')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Oink! Oink!</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">But <b>life</b> wasn't meant to be easy,  was it now? <b>...</b> (Sounds of: Oink! Oink! Oink!) By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/342/19823 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:ZGEdFrsLrNMJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/342/19823+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=80">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/342/19823">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=70&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/342/19823')">Note this</a><br></span></nobr></font><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/331/20481" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','81','AFQjCNEeinUCKjfKfAqoQjS6NBbe6Dcc6w','&sig2=e3oFKJ60EerEixpna6X6Kw')">reen Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Deciding</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">REGULAR FEATURE. <b>Life of Riley</b>: Deciding. 2 September 1998 <b>...</b> Decisions. Decisions. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/331/20481 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:ZuCsHytrU-EJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/331/20481+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=81">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/331/20481">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=80&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/331/20481')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/330/20553" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','82','AFQjCNFuSXlNUKsUKRCzBIU0YS8nh3H98A','&sig2=1eBfEA-an61pdenD4dI1JQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: It was I</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: It was I. Just the other day I went for a walk. It was my lunchtime. The sun was shining,  <b>...</b> I'd appreciate that. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/330/20553 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:7iIitOmxqOAJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/330/20553+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=82">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/330/20553">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=80&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/330/20553')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/263/17635" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','83','AFQjCNHBcnO7f6976AbECffR9G4lpjqX2Q','&sig2=DMMWOuA9PyiR_qQsUQ2gog')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: This talkback thing</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">We didn't go through <b>life</b> expecting an easy ride. We weren't asking for hand-outs. <b>...</b> We have time for two more calls. Next caller? By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/263/17635 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:MVLAG4GRQCAJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/263/17635+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=83">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/263/17635">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=80&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/263/17635')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/353/19211" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','84','AFQjCNFneIpOraaASjrB-77OeMD_bJChlw','&sig2=FWI8euTEmxnQnSrH3yTcRg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: A metaphor</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">It's a figure of speech. A metaphor? -- Yeah. I just know we can (pant). By <b>Dave</b> <b>Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/353/19211 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:_8HqyEwpfnIJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/353/19211+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=84">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/353/19211">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=80&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/353/19211')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/322/20971" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','85','AFQjCNFeK7f11itDuEAsAG7yBUF0FrVlqA','&sig2=wtzhGbKoht23In2dOROJuA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Our mutual friend</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: Our mutual friend. 24 June 1998 <b>...</b> What's that? He's our racist. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/322/20971 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:d_PeKveZjhUJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/322/20971+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=85">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/322/20971">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=80&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/322/20971')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/274/16955" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','86','AFQjCNGEzT0dMru53VMa_PCpV_SvXOWOKQ','&sig2=MWOOfgYW7ykZNY38WkGyNQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Privy preservation</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Dave Riley</b> Email:dhell@ozemail.com.au. * Concerned “LADIES” and “GENTS” are urged to sign up today <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/274/16955 - 18k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:hE5rLtJwFYQJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/274/16955+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=86">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/274/16955">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=80&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/274/16955')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/313/21575" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','87','AFQjCNE1ZSTq_Wbk06llYh42OwVXZlsRFg','&sig2=DAhC00Z-lUgXoEtotXYrwA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: You can take comfort <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">My resilience from the toll <b>life</b> levies rests on a little-known feature of my existence:  I'm the second <b>...</b>  Just don't tell Dad I told you so. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/313/21575 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:eO8hC-_xgUYJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/313/21575+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=87">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/313/21575">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=80&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/313/21575')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/289/16058" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','88','AFQjCNEN04cCbb5yumlfYEOdaHE6QbMPvg','&sig2=iukr2hMtbbSRN6RPmoloTw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Di is dead</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">You can't, can you? Perhaps you're right. We will never see her like again.” By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/289/16058 - 18k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:h8QVw_GAnyIJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/289/16058+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=88">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/289/16058">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=80&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/289/16058')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/424/22581" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','89','AFQjCNH9c6uUzrZZDDIAiiukfFa7vyJ6eA','&sig2=U1twQGCU67gVcshXO9ER5g')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Carnival of the oppressed</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt;. From: Archives, Green Left Weekly issue #424 11 October 2000. <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Loose . <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/424/22581 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:fMcnuDJ0uL8J:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/424/22581+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=89">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/424/22581">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=80&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/424/22581')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/175/12615" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','90','AFQjCNErJ3SlRXL0yCcjlVO3CawU1EalYQ','&sig2=8PsQG4ciVPKY6QbB5WcIvA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Green Left Weekly <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Dave Riley</b>. I want to explain all about Green Left Weekly so that you can get into its very vitals. <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1995/175/12615 - 18k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:EG0Z-fh5mvcJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/175/12615+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=90">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/175/12615">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=80&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/175/12615')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <!--z--><nobr><br></nobr><font size="-1"><nobr><span class="bl"></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <!--z--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/301/15311" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','91','AFQjCNGzTOok5qB5NenQSM6B8GyZArlRsQ','&sig2=iv6Mtgon02mwQzeAmDceWQ')">n Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Diabolical forces</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1997 » #301 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Diabolical forces <b>...</b> That bad, eh? Bad! It'll be so bad we'll be dead. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/301/15311 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:DwJSXJ_62MAJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/301/15311+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=91">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/301/15311">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=90&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/301/15311')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/179/12426" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','92','AFQjCNHgk0E3__N048RPr-5WN5XTTS-bdg','&sig2=gWbBFldS1A1t6P_FrPSDyA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Coming out</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">By <b>Dave Riley</b>. I admit to it. It was some time ago when I first realised that despite the pressure <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Loose . <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1995/179/12426 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:NQe5G4suawUJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/179/12426+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=92">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/179/12426">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=90&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/179/12426')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/183/12253" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','93','AFQjCNF71drVKoeQ01j_9QSZAaB_8489PQ','&sig2=PJBQxIREC68ojhZSh33XHw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Bump me into parliament</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Of course, I'd keep doing these columns and tell you all about <b>life</b> in the Lodge, <b>...</b> Forget the swanky suits and the vitriol, <b>Dave Riley</b> is no smart arse. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1995/183/12253 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:EiItvQIhSVgJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/183/12253+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=93">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/183/12253">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=90&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/183/12253')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/234/14226" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','94','AFQjCNFq5OFJ6dyK3AyPUlyTvxCmCIi61Q','&sig2=usxlOJfyn5xWt-taVZQoYw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: (If It Could) A <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">For 50 years of my <b>life</b> to come nobody will care for me. I'll just have to help myself. A job? <b>...</b> But tell me: why doesn't it stay this way? <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/234/14226 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:exxlepPbAoEJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/234/14226+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=94">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/234/14226">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=90&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/234/14226')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/221/14937" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','95','AFQjCNEXNJkCCX2cyFyRdRrCLLbxEoGmaw','&sig2=cTKi9_aZp4LZuGC9Cb8buA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Bookmark | Print. Home » 1996 » #221 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b> <b>...</b> But most of all, he remains an incurable optimist. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/221/14937 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:St5d-gQ-jkAJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/221/14937+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=95">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/221/14937">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=90&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/221/14937')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/265/17522" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','96','AFQjCNGX48q_fmSeVVcZkIca3q4LNw9_CQ','&sig2=BchZR37nSRlNxGs-EYlt3Q')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Bioencephalopathy: A <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: Bioencephalopathy: A manual for sufferers. 5 March 1997 <b>...</b> @column auth = By <b>Dave Riley</b>. E-mail: dhell@ozemail.com.au. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/265/17522 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:qs4RizgSBe4J:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/265/17522+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=96">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/265/17522">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=90&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/265/17522')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/256/12930" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','97','AFQjCNHRD7ofh-iJQo79Uqwvwz__isH9Nw','&sig2=pmUYIYhyCNm4t34VN8YUsA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Tea for two</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>...</b> and changed for the better." "What a pity", she  said, "that the world didn't". By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/256/12930 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:X71GemAgjXkJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/256/12930+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=97">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/256/12930">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=90&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/256/12930')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/268/17348" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','98','AFQjCNFiB_O3bG_oRfvX99IUq8KVA0HBOA','&sig2=0pWUoT00sznXPgaGlByjtw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The story so far</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: The story so far. 26 March 1997 <b>...</b> By <b>Dave Riley</b> E-Mail: dhell@ozemail.com.au. <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/268/17348 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:0bErSRxtSdkJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/268/17348+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=98">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/268/17348">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=90&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/268/17348')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/294/15735" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','99','AFQjCNFbt1RGikCO6rktR3VqAP7xJCUQ8w','&sig2=smcGhSVLu10X2xBjQqzhHA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: My meeting with Che <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">“Che! Your face. It's the face of revolution!” You see. I told you that I never died. By <b>Dave  Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Loose . <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/294/15735 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:BtT9jSspPZUJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/294/15735+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=99">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/294/15735">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=90&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/294/15735')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/281/16571" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','100','AFQjCNGwK32jTH8diOkS0Db9ZAR_7to7mA','&sig2=NG6BydGw3qxr5bex3Ep9gw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The ghost of Egon <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Dave Riley</b> Email:dhell@ozemail.com.au <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose ... Regular Feature: News b. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/281/16571 - 19k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:uRA3tQOfeEoJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/281/16571+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=100">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/281/16571">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=90&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/281/16571')">Note this</a><br></span></nobr></font><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/309/21790" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','101','AFQjCNELBaAKHpQ43wY4rIkgePFH3_YmYA','&sig2=XMty5c_4Y9izCU4udJ3d9g')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The chickens are <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1998 » #309  » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The chickens <b>...</b> and it was your mistake starting a family in the first place. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/309/21790 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:Zb_LqhW4VUwJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/309/21790+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=101">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/309/21790">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=100&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/309/21790')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/271/17172" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','102','AFQjCNFIfnhjiXzI3_fsURSdb2rwqUmQ4g','&sig2=eZ71jzHPkHRtRrm9lYL9Ug')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Them and us</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: Them and us. 23 April 1997 <b>...</b> <b>Dave Riley</b> Email: dhell@ozemail.com.au <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/271/17172 - 18k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:P6Ox4K1l8cEJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/271/17172+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=102">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/271/17172">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=100&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/271/17172')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/423/22660" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','103','AFQjCNH38fY5lF3ao8FfFpLQldEzcW-RmA','&sig2=kZ5dnckmX4r_MQ9q7j5unw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The rat race</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">So the winner will be? — Profits. Comes first every time. BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b>. <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose . <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/423/22660 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:72MXnjNXIYwJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/423/22660+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=103">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/423/22660">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=100&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/423/22660')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/288/16122" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','104','AFQjCNEWH07NcI0L1A9o4sYWhjAGEglfzg','&sig2=j8ux8Qcc-I1UaM7QDvogoQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Is  there a God?</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">“John Howard killed him by proving how unnecessary He was.” <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose . <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/288/16122 - 18k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:Mcez-8YuG8IJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/288/16122+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=104">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/288/16122">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=100&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/288/16122')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/307/21868" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','105','AFQjCNGmu5IajRAbWe8Nh6z9AreDcmbnJQ','&sig2=CTnhGuxKbtIa78UIbLaF2g')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: An excuse for butchery</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1998 » #307 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: An excuse for <b>...</b> once upon a time, their butchers were our butchers). By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/307/21868 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:wPOp4ebJjR4J:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/307/21868+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=105">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/307/21868">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=100&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/307/21868')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/280/16618" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','106','AFQjCNGcOqVKZpbRVIUfER6Xd2z-wECwUg','&sig2=RmZv2BfOCQ6zkN8GQ6wpwg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Plain words for hard <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Dave Riley</b>. Email: dhell@ozemail.com.au <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose ... Regular Feature: News b. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/280/16618 - 18k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:HVLefKCwwKEJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/280/16618+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=106">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/280/16618">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=100&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/280/16618')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/273/17055" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','107','AFQjCNFDa3Nu7Kp51euA5PjPIw5y_doQ_Q','&sig2=NQP0X6Lbjl7UCa49Qf94sQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Newcastle — you never <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">But it would be a boring old <b>life</b> if we didn't have a few challenges thrown our way. It keeps us on our toes. <b>...</b> By <b>Dave Riley</b>. Email: dhell@ozemail.com.au <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/273/17055 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:JfJ3Oj4uc3wJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/273/17055+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=107">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/273/17055">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=100&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/273/17055')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/420/22782" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','108','AFQjCNG9DuFBaqO033Ibq4bXccbYKzrspw','&sig2=VunW9QLTbs2i_BjRccpSsw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Follow the flame</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b> &lt;http://www.ozemail.com.au/~dhell&gt;. From: Archives,  Green Left Weekly issue #420 13 <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/420/22782 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:xphBBcpginAJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/420/22782+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=108">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/420/22782">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=100&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/420/22782')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/390/24582" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','109','AFQjCNGGpvqb7_M-9KBv7mK_VWBn33RzPw','&sig2=5SUI5l2d0XVYByxs0Lknvg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The wowsers are back</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Bookmark | Print. Home » 2000 » #390 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The wowsers are back <b>...</b> By <b>Dave Riley</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt; <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/390/24582 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:BByeHmZwelwJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/390/24582+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=109">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/390/24582">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=100&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/390/24582')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/415/23076" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','110','AFQjCNGftUkVoF9YJ2eo3QaEr0cpUfiVoQ','&sig2=W2QFS1qKvNnM4mubpRImKw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Tale of a numb bum</a></h2><font size="-1"><b>Dave Riley</b> &lt;http://www.ozemail.com.au/~dhell&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose ... Regular Feature: Networ. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/415/23076 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:OFwk5VFfETMJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/415/23076+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=110">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/415/23076">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=100&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/415/23076')">Note this</a><br></span></nobr></font><nobr><br></nobr><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/319/21193" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','111','AFQjCNGQipb-gssjIJgD1E5_FDJhn5u9mA','&sig2=Zz3Cc4cJm7iR76PR4_9y5w')">reen Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Unloved</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Buggered if I know! Who's counting? By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose . <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/319/21193 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:rF0VqomamzwJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/319/21193+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=111">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/319/21193">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=110&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/319/21193')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/394/24363" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','112','AFQjCNGH4vyFjsaD-nmm44ra8WrRNWptCQ','&sig2=NsB9GJdOm90JOGEZxMjwMw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Win with Winston</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 2000 » #394 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Win with Winston <b>...</b> web at &lt;http://www.ozemail.com.au/~dhell/winston.htm&gt;.] By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/394/24363 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:r7HVLuvOhVkJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/394/24363+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=112">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/394/24363">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=110&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/394/24363')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/395/24260" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','113','AFQjCNGqUxb60mjo_UTr-z3cMCLdgGF0Ig','&sig2=wUEoWCdvu9DNU2Zf3qynTA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Next door</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">REGULAR FEATURE. <b>Life of Riley</b>: Next door. 1 March 2000 <b>...</b> By <b>Dave</b> <b>Riley</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/395/24260 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:ERMWv6333ssJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/395/24260+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=113">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/395/24260">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=110&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/395/24260')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/398/24112" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','114','AFQjCNGhzp9U2kiXVcWjfUXCCoJ-WJNRPQ','&sig2=umSmCDAtLA8MNI05Mu8tyA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: April Fools' Day</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: April Fools' Day. 22 March 2000 <b>...</b> By <b>Dave Riley</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/398/24112 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:anYSQs2_dncJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/398/24112+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=114">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/398/24112">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=110&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/398/24112')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/407/23589" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','115','AFQjCNGWh-HKbSUoZ8G8oqAU0ktkvSojsQ','&sig2=xKA2dLdH4G9aXlvWwG9EkQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: We  are all reconciled</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Ah, I was only practicing. BY <b>DAVE RILEY</b> &lt;http://www.ozemail.com.au/~dhell&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/407/23589 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:gfYajb4mdVUJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/407/23589+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=115">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/407/23589">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=110&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/407/23589')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/324/20871" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','116','AFQjCNEbNLxN-q7JnD36mPRS5O89ZPj2AQ','&sig2=0tF3hmjdn2cqV3lOfx9Nvw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: How to be true blue</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1998 » #324 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: How to be true blue <b>...</b> why I'm the Little Aussie Battler™ and you're not.” By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/324/20871 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:sFv6n8zqjKkJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/324/20871+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=116">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/324/20871">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=110&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/324/20871')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/336/20196" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','117','AFQjCNFAssbEmxTcLtdtkWBVyk62sfrCjQ','&sig2=HkDxp2nRRTFNTkzQdcq0Ew')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The same old routine</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Don't worry, you'll get over it. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose ... Regular Feature: On the. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/336/20196 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:R5e2LFDJq9MJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/336/20196+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=117">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/336/20196">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=110&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/336/20196')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/350/19419" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','118','AFQjCNECj4-ivRfyS6CzzsYEf63gVaL2BQ','&sig2=y5xrO9WnwIh8ybuqohD2bQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Kurds come from Kurdistan</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">More for some than others. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose ... Regular Feature: On the. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/350/19419 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:21fr5P5Umu8J:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/350/19419+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=118">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/350/19419">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=110&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/350/19419')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/360/18856" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','119','AFQjCNHWTDpU1EljXK_O2Nth-Qrn4F2YQw','&sig2=5xNn0qa7FTtvyKHHK2pb7w')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: That's what  friends <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">That's what friends are for. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose ... Regular Feature: On the. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/360/18856 - 14k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:MPItN6z4qKsJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/360/18856+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=119">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/360/18856">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=110&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/360/18856')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/228/14576" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','120','AFQjCNF06pmmaotCuAa131wynv83qqk-mA','&sig2=npzBi52OxFDkkgqqtBOw6w')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Bill gets his 15 minutes</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1996 » #228 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Bill gets <b>...</b> the famous Bill Hayden -- the man who saw Bob Hawke in the nude! <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/228/14576 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:1zUcWRXbpNIJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/228/14576+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=120">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/228/14576">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=110&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/228/14576')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <!--z--><nobr><br></nobr><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&amp;ct=res&amp;cd=121&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.greenleft.org.au%2F1999%2F384%2F18129&amp;ei=IBHSR-WAPIqmpATdzODuDA&amp;usg=AFQjCNFdmHQPedtiGIJnjZqDDSn5kDzZag&amp;sig2=Nlor2_35x3WEyKCiPCnU8Q" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','121','AFQjCNFdmHQPedtiGIJnjZqDDSn5kDzZag','&sig2=Nlor2_35x3WEyKCiPCnU8Q')">eft - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Fiddling on the margins</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">By <b>Dave Riley</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose ... Regular Feature: Networ. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/384/18129 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:Y656yh0z_zIJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/384/18129+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=121">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/384/18129">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=120&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/384/18129')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/246/13490" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','122','AFQjCNGD294EBUQuYQ6tB8fnwkNCIUyg2A','&sig2=xJ-z1gHAYzUDIQ6KOlhAKQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The story so far</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1996 » #246 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The story <b>...</b> While such rough visions did appear, oil is safe for another year. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/246/13490 - 18k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:AwDtpY_Q4ToJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/246/13490+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=122">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/246/13490">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=120&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/246/13490')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/260/17783" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','123','AFQjCNGiSzLbyyut8Js5COSERURgLmT_Nw','&sig2=eO51SXaMG7LsXmsxzofB5g')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The Wicked Wik of the <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1997 » #260 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The Wicked Wik of the North <b>...</b>  were punished for their crimes by the RSPCA. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/260/17783 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:x_K1pFV_AxQJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/260/17783+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=123">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/260/17783">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=120&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/260/17783')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/316/21365" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','124','AFQjCNFSOYRH_LHWyOe_6_xCPRdqlcq_Mw','&sig2=UVbKleP0CLGBakL3pjMS-Q')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The bit what's left</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">And, by the way, that's not you. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose ... Regular Feature: On the. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/316/21365 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:Semze5qEtqoJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/316/21365+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=124">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/316/21365">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=120&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/316/21365')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/233/14269" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','125','AFQjCNFawAROnLNovBfTbYqlMnkp_gXZ9g','&sig2=DKFbd_lsOcJ7Px8qod19ig')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">And I, dear reader, have spent my <b>life</b> among them. I'm not proud. <b>...</b> Maybe for the likes of me, <b>life</b> wasn't meant to be greedy. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/233/14269 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:AHSoXdqnKNwJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/233/14269+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=125">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/233/14269">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=120&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/233/14269')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/304/22053" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','126','AFQjCNHNM4ZUARUuAWnWm9MRNxinFjqthg','&sig2=3kD255AJpEYFnddX8RFx_Q')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: I love rupiah</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1998 » #304 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: I love rupiah <b>...</b> our mates in Jakarta may not be around much longer. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/304/22053 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:EWCZNtqYOmgJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/304/22053+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=126">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/304/22053">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=120&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/304/22053')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/387/17988" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','127','AFQjCNEPKutBTVyU5mp7fJ9jyICjo7-Owg','&sig2=v-Cr03cUFcHqTjHkGQrXmw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Trespassers prosecuted</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">By <b>Dave Riley</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b> Issues: <b>Life</b> on the wha... Issues: Plans for SA nu. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/387/17988 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:Ir5XRJzmIyIJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/387/17988+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=127">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/387/17988">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=120&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/387/17988')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/340/19956" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','128','AFQjCNEumnMe_4VZx3DnK_Kdkv26tCv32A','&sig2=P7E_bNJ8WQ8SWd1pMnedQQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Out of sight, out of mind</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1998 » #340 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Out of sight, <b>...</b> Horn without the passengers being  the worse for the journey. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/340/19956 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:06yJpC_BYBIJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/340/19956+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=128">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/340/19956">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=120&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/340/19956')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/389/24619" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','129','AFQjCNHgXrhsT-lzlHFp1f6MtgxNek3crg','&sig2=G2F4QAT2BiiY-lPko_xyPg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Keeping us safe from <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 2000 » #389 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Keeping us safe from marauding queue jumpers <b>...</b> By <b>Dave Riley</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt; <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/389/24619 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:c63SVzTxlqYJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/389/24619+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=129">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/389/24619">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=120&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/389/24619')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/326/20738" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','130','AFQjCNFAkJWinVLKVbwChipaDhbd7gWwNw','&sig2=1F5RXaEgHUdr7RAPh8RhbQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The red mole</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Caught in the act Of spreading the fact That we'd rather be red than dead. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/326/20738 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:6QAE_AWq2fgJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/326/20738+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=130">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/326/20738">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=120&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/326/20738')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font></td></tr></tbody></table></div><nobr><br></nobr><font size="-1"><nobr><span class="bl"></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <!--z--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/385/18091" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','131','AFQjCNElWtyzVuvBJwIOtAt99wMezq2fJg','&sig2=ZRhVH0fRylxz-KQMlO9viA')">een Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The Wall</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Bookmark | Print. Home » 1999 » #385 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The Wall <b>...</b> <b>Dave Riley</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt; <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/385/18091 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:Rxm0TaDs8kAJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/385/18091+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=131">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/385/18091">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=130&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/385/18091')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/310/21727" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','132','AFQjCNHPkVyUSCtQmoXnX-VILy9DfkmyuA','&sig2=EM5d65smDa5Q7i2Xjq4tjw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The Suharto <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: The Suharto Protection Society. 18 March 1998 <b>...</b> habitat and heritage always comes first for the Suharto Protection Society. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/310/21727 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:-Q9YEpo9x20J:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/310/21727+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=132">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/310/21727">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=130&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/310/21727')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/262/17680" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','133','AFQjCNFYuI-jJmHbOYTIqovqdFe8rZVpJQ','&sig2=jzVrxASySoQUjxaJchJYMQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Mr spermatozoon finds <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Such is <b>life</b> ... for sperm. Lest we forget them. If it wasn't for those few who make <b>...</b> If you don't like it, you can go play with yourself. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/262/17680 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:P2UT0G8Bu14J:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/262/17680+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=133">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/262/17680">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=130&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/262/17680')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/386/18026" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','134','AFQjCNGTXA3mLR9F3L8q_U_l3NQ2x2KsbA','&sig2=juoPtYG2ZrRMDKbiwzs0tg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Keep up the good work</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: Keep up the good work.  24 November 1999 <b>...</b> By <b>Dave</b> <b>Riley</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/386/18026 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:CDqkqZPvoQcJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/386/18026+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=134">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/386/18026">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=130&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/386/18026')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/249/13357" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','135','AFQjCNFKQa8AO8J_iBL1hTrXs-uwEATT-w','&sig2=VKb9FF4aQ1mPKDv0a7Y-qQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The Ever So Ordinary MP</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1996 » #249 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The Ever So Ordinary MP <b>...</b> all I can say is this: Liar! Liar! Pants on fire! <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/249/13357 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:iA9wY4esUhMJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/249/13357+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=135">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/249/13357">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=130&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/249/13357')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/276/16854" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','136','AFQjCNHsT0t5K9KZ0SpIijV9W7s_PQozGw','&sig2=qJ1nPZMWBLhIjpq2rBosqQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: A one notion nation</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Comrades: everything we hold dear -- our way of <b>life</b>, the traditional clicking of the proverbial shears, <b>...</b> By <b>Dave Riley</b>. Email: dhell@ozemail.com.au. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/276/16854 - 18k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:z5gs9rqx3_kJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/276/16854+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=136">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/276/16854">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=130&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/276/16854')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/352/19283" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','137','AFQjCNGtUs5enc4iTKdnx-gtzUcTHKbTLg','&sig2=yZ2ojbdZgOMwPfBKegZfBQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The postmodern condition</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1999 » #352 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The postmodern <b>...</b> way of saying that this is the best of all possible worlds. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/352/19283 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:jNDG-GSGalEJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/352/19283+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=137">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/352/19283">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=130&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/352/19283')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/173/12737" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','138','AFQjCNHnyLNSj4ohnMWX-uI-2vvidUELOA','&sig2=964KL_DLf37HOMc1zj_r9w')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Gareth is coming</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1995 » #173 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Gareth is coming <b>...</b> will accept Evans' invitation to anchor somewhere off Bondi. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1995/173/12737 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:ihvL6O6LteEJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/173/12737+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=138">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/173/12737">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=130&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/173/12737')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/410/23407" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','139','AFQjCNEV-WOVJowKahJm-Whw7-LLxgzFyw','&sig2=cMUjNDFSIzWa5ndLquNKoQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: If not, what?</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Get a <b>life</b>! You're one lucky bastard. Haven't you been listening? Ask the RSL any day of the week: “we <b>...</b> By <b>Dave Riley</b> &lt;http://www.ozemail.com.au/~dhell&gt; <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/410/23407 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:H-2gj-dqnccJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/410/23407+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=139">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/410/23407">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=130&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/410/23407')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/187/12001" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','140','AFQjCNFdpXFyHOHCNpQVpSiNgGBTKfXPQA','&sig2=44y9qttTIJKABEb504c4Jg')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The swagman cometh</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">By <b>Dave Riley</b>. Maybe you are fed up with the city and its teeming peoples. Their ways and means, <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1995/187/12001 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:3w9or0Ub6PAJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/187/12001+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=140">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1995/187/12001">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=130&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1995/187/12001')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <!--z--><nobr><br></nobr><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/348/19516" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','141','AFQjCNGDp14R_gAS4izv41CW0rxejarcxg','&sig2=2MsrJJSXZnEJ1zDlDvIXgw')">een Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: When it pleases me</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1999 » #348 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: When it pleases <b>...</b> I was to change my mind. (Rises). Yes, Sir. Then it wouldn't. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/348/19516 - 14k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:VflxrsxyaZwJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/348/19516+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=141">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/348/19516">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=140&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/348/19516')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/244/13668" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','142','AFQjCNEvMgK9gVIIU1hr0b0r3VrI3ICnYQ','&sig2=1UqF6sIwwo0iCgDOzUmTPw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Today is the day</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1996 » #244 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Today is the day <b>...</b> to lose (here's an oldie but a goodie) but your chains. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/244/13668 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:_6oXZsSnjgQJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/244/13668+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=142">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/244/13668">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=140&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/244/13668')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/165/8575" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','143','AFQjCNHZ90XsCfJI0G6fbH6C7HWdT38oOA','&sig2=HD-uvqauYwos0LXjNCZKIA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Depression hits <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: Depression hits Robinson Crusoe's island <b>...</b> By <b>Dave Riley</b>. “Friday”, said Robinson Crusoe”, I'm sorry, I fear I must lay you off.” <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1994/165/8575 - 18k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:GIDlpOhSlkYJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/165/8575+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=143">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/165/8575">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=140&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/165/8575')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/314/21479" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','144','AFQjCNGGAlZP-2a814RWONJE9ZAGgJAnPQ','&sig2=z9NPKpIMlIRwgfSNK0_f3g')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: It has come!</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1998 » #314 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: It has come! <b>...</b> our voices in sweet song: “Will ye not come back again?”. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/314/21479 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:tr_MSWVApUQJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/314/21479+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=144">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/314/21479">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=140&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/314/21479')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/346/19636" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','145','AFQjCNHlNmgGGEIrPIm5eZ7QbTzgqkNDgQ','&sig2=JYzaiG9_OZnq-bRTRoDp2g')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Australia Day 1999</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Bookmark | Print. Home » 1999 » #346 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Australia Day 1999 <b>...</b> for we are young and free ... etcetera. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/346/19636 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:2yL2xme7GrgJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/346/19636+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=145">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/346/19636">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=140&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/346/19636')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/334/20274" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','146','AFQjCNHPMjIO5dHE9vc7D6Rzjzq8vtFiFw','&sig2=GiiB0s2YF5VkPTSFD0GHZA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Figures</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1998 » #334 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Figures <b>...</b> If Lowe can give us a figure for one thing why not for others? By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/334/20274 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:Gmlyz-nP2wQJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/334/20274+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=146">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/334/20274">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=140&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/334/20274')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/283/16394" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','147','AFQjCNHwz3SH_Sbh7gWeoivzEeKZodgFiw','&sig2=tUr4wNY7YWk4HTgxxqi7aQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: PC or no PC, that is <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">“Where you goin', pa?” “Out, ma.” “Out where, pa?” “Same place as yesterday.” By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/283/16394 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:4qhLwCO7lo8J:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/283/16394+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=147">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/283/16394">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=140&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/283/16394')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/406/23660" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','148','AFQjCNF2MIjyKYHrc9X2t1siU9hMOcVV4Q','&sig2=u6tgUE8DjHS1H2uQc_LMFQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Do you want tax with <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Whoopee do! By <b>Dave Riley</b>. &lt;http://www.ozemail.com.au/~dhell&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin... Regular Feature: Loose . <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/406/23660 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:ZFbZiSZ3qt0J:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/406/23660+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=148">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/406/23660">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=140&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/406/23660')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/285/16321" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','149','AFQjCNGyq8lj6tZJX8ciYwFFmMgoUm64yg','&sig2=PsMha1puesa4J-DVdKfuOQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Mr Pot is alive and <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: Mr Pot is alive and well and living in Thredbo <b>...</b> he could then write back home, “Wish you were all alive to be here.” By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1997/285/16321 - 18k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:ws11zkovCzwJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/285/16321+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=149">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1997/285/16321">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=140&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1997/285/16321')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/318/21266" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','150','AFQjCNHzmO1QOAN9hSt9mf1b0N7fK08Dxg','&sig2=Ms5Z4QcV5e2nT_vefZdgaQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: That's the point</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">I mean, all you want out of <b>life</b> is three square meals a day and a roof over your head. <b>...</b> That's the point, isn't it? So it is. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/318/21266 - 16k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:pJfwieGPqH0J:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/318/21266+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=150">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/318/21266">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=140&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/318/21266')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font></td></tr></tbody></table></div><nobr><br><br></nobr><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/325/20827" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','151','AFQjCNF6NCuhidrqUU0te-s6tkbAxWPG7g','&sig2=KSFJFRTah4inYUjUwXNVfQ')">een Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The tale of Robin Hood</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1998 » #325 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: The tale of Robin <b>...</b> in his haste to die so, Robin forgot to pay his GST. By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1998/325/20827 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:V_43OeYF2PAJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/325/20827+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=151">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1998/325/20827">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=150&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1998/325/20827')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/362/18777" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','152','AFQjCNFsNW-NR0sdIfCXFL9Dw5H4xLw2lg','&sig2=66Yl8KUicLaglhbYvZgSDA')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Let's hear it for fools!</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">I'm sure you'll think of something. -- I don't suppose you'd ... No, I wouldn't! By <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/362/18777 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:Vk5TBqNwUCMJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/362/18777+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=152">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/362/18777">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=150&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/362/18777')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/396/24227" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','153','AFQjCNEu1JBKtmUN7pImWWwXGSZtzYBeQQ','&sig2=SxoS_p6l-ZGXnxpogjgsnQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: A message from the <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: A message from the sponsor. 8 March 2000 <b>...</b> By <b>Dave</b> <b>Riley</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/396/24227 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:KGgDQijy9ssJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/396/24227+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=153">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/396/24227">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=150&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/396/24227')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/229/14509" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','154','AFQjCNH7iX4LzFcjgsiyd1QX4pKQ3o36iw','&sig2=sl4NRNZC4vg0IF12k0PN8A')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Getting to know the <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">Home » 1996 » #229 » Archives » Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Getting to know the <b>...</b> another group of layabouts we could well do without ..." <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/229/14509 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:6ahe8QUPNbEJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/229/14509+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=154">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/229/14509">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=150&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/229/14509')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/163/8650" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','155','AFQjCNGz24R7bZ3Jsy9jMhTji0nLYVkq-g','&sig2=J30Zw81XWrik3dRGeayxMw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Life's a beach in Haiti</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: Life's a beach in Haiti. 19 October 1994. By <b>Dave Riley</b>. Uncle Sam says: I want you. I want you in khaki.  I want you in Haiti. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1994/163/8650 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:xTdAlD3vKxQJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/163/8650+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=155">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/163/8650">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=150&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/163/8650')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/245/13556" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','156','AFQjCNGPbSEjrUOAMwxYHrxFou3AW7nNbg','&sig2=SASNkeJL9N9z-k2Mcv4d3Q')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Waiting for Lefty</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">A Voice: No. I never thought about it. Myself: That's what we lefties are here for. <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1996/245/13556 - 18k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:1vqihrrjIVUJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/245/13556+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=156">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1996/245/13556">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=150&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1996/245/13556')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/393/24382" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','157','AFQjCNEOPRsywigECSQ_DoWXZHez5vre7w','&sig2=TorftfR3C2OXtr30Jmhoxw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: To GST or not</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1"><b>Life of Riley</b>: To GST or not. 16 February 2000 <b>...</b> By <b>Dave Riley</b> &lt;dhell@ozemail.com.au&gt; <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/2000/393/24382 - 15k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:QyyN95xJ8mcJ:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/393/24382+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=157">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/2000/393/24382">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=150&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/2000/393/24382')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/169/8369" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','158','AFQjCNHhMJiJR2ZsVFh6_oILePZmBIbVaw','&sig2=shrFtobwp1mlMeEzod7rYw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Prayer of the Foetus <b>...</b></a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">By <b>Dave Riley</b>. Every time I open my wallet an avalanche of lubricated <b>...</b> Ralph dispenses from his shop, he prescribes an organic sex <b>life</b> for all. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1994/169/8369 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:xsRV6nLXikMJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/169/8369+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=158">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/169/8369">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=150&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/169/8369')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/354/19155" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','159','AFQjCNHYOQlK5ERG6SDkRtAzdTD8r-ThIA','&sig2=m6eA3c3A9eFXXohIU5uXmQ')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Jeeves</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">But I mean to say. I mean, what's the use? These menials simply don't get it, what? <b>Dave Riley</b> <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1999/354/19155 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:teZ3KG7jAvEJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/354/19155+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=159">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1999/354/19155">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=150&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1999/354/19155')">Note this</a></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <div class="g"><!--m--><h2 class="r"><a href="http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/160/8840" class="l" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','res','160','AFQjCNEq3pMEbWdOjp1qKF4cpJNunNCoyA','&sig2=VPopscsAsVBiWQMjhTcWvw')">Green Left - Regular Feature: <b>Life of Riley</b>: Lest we forget</a></h2><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="j"><font size="-1">By <b>Dave Riley</b>. I am sick of the bitter, sectarian divisiveness that exists on the left in this <b>...</b> Regular Feature: <b>Life</b> o... Regular Feature: Lookin. <b>...</b><br><span class="a">www.greenleft.org.au/1994/160/8840 - 17k - </span><nobr><a class="fl" href="http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:DVVxoF3ZXQsJ:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/160/8840+dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;ct=clnk&amp;cd=160">Cached</a> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=related:www.greenleft.org.au/1994/160/8840">Similar pages</a><span class="bl"> - <a class="fl" href="http://www.google.com/search?q=dave+life+of+riley+site:greenleft.org.au&amp;hl=en&amp;start=150&amp;sa=N#" onclick="return gnb._add(this, 'http://www.greenleft.org.au/1994/160/8840')">Note this</a><br><br></span></nobr></font><!--n--></td></tr></tbody></table></div> <!--z--><nobr><br><br></nobr><font size="-1"><nobr><span class="bl"></span></nobr></font></html>
<html><embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http://picasaweb.google.com.au/s/c/bin/slideshow.swf" flashvars="host=picasaweb.google.com.au&amp;captions=1&amp;noautoplay=1&amp;RGB=0x000000&amp;feed=http%3A%2F%2Fpicasaweb.google.com.au%2Fdata%2Ffeed%2Fapi%2Fuser%2Fratbagradio%2Falbumid%2F5098397518300411217%3Fkind%3Dphoto%26alt%3Drss" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" height="400" width="600"></html>
PERSONAL
 MyJournal
[[Family Slideshow]]
[[Slideshows]]
[[Contact Me!]]
PROJECTS 
[[Wikis]]
[[Audio]]
[[Presentations]]
[[Comments]]
TAGS
<<tagCloud>>
<<tagCloud>>
<<tagCloud>>
Mozilla Firefox, Portable Edition
your browser, your way... in your pocket™

Mozilla Firefox®, Portable Edition is the popular Mozilla Firefox web browser bundled with a PortableApps.com Launcher as a portable app, so you can take your bookmarks, extensions and saved passwords with you.
Download Now 2.0.0.12 for Windows, English 6.0MB Languages | Details

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Mozilla Firefox, Portable Edition is an integral part of the PortableApps.com Suite™.

Like Firefox Portable? You'll love having Firefox on your PC: Firefox 2 or Firefox with Google Toolbar
Features

portable_firefox_small.pngMozilla Firefox is a fast, full-featured web browser that's easy to use. It has lots of great features including popup-blocking, tabbed-browsing, integrated search, improved privacy features, automatic updating and more. Plus, thanks to the PortableApps.com launcher bundled in the Mozilla Firefox, Portable Edition, it leaves no personal information behind on the machine you run it on, so you can take your favorite browser along with all your favorite bookmarks and extensions with you wherever you go. Learn more about Mozilla Firefox...
Support

osi_certified.pngFor help getting Firefox Portable up and running, visit Firefox Portable Support:

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    * Known Issues
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There's also a list of Frequently Asked Questions and a Support Forum.

Source: [[Mozilla Firefox, Portable Edition : PortableApps.com - Portable software for USB drives|http://portableapps.com/apps/internet/firefox_portable]]
http://www.unionair.cjb.net/20071215.mp3 <<deliciousPlayTagger>>
<<MTE>>
/***
|''Name:''|MultiTagEditorPlugin|
|''Version:''|0.2.0 (Dec 29, 2006)|
|''Source:''|http://ido-xp.tiddlyspot.com/#MultiTagEditorPlugin|
|''Author:''|Ido Magal (idoXatXidomagalXdotXcom)|
|''Licence:''|[[BSD open source license]]|
|''CoreVersion:''|2.1.0|
|''Browser:''|??|

!Description
This plugin enables the addition and deletion of tags from sets of tiddlers.

!Installation instructions
*Create a new tiddler in your wiki and copy the contents of this tiddler into it.  Name it the same and tag it with "systemConfig".
*Save and reload your wiki.
*Use it here [[MultiTagEditor]].

!Revision history
* v0.2.0 (Dec 29, 2006)
** Added Selection column that allows excluding tiddlers.
* v0.1.0 (Dec 27, 2006)
** First draft.

!To Do
* Clean up text strings.
* Figure out how to store selection so it isn't reset after every action.
* Prettify layout.

!Code
***/
//{{{

merge(config.shadowTiddlers,
{
	MultiTagEditor:[
	"<<MTE>>",
	""
	].join("\n")
});

config.macros.MTE =
{
	AddToListLabel : "Add to List",
	AddToListPrompt : "Add Tiddlers to the List",
	listViewTemplate :
	{
		columns: [
			{name: 'Selected', field: 'Selected', rowName: 'title', type: 'Selector'},
			{name: 'Title', field: 'title', tiddlerLink: 'title', title: "Title", type: 'TiddlerLink'},
			{name: 'Snippet', field: 'text', title: "Snippet", type: 'String'},
			{name: 'Tags', field: 'tags', title: "Tags", type: 'Tags'}
			],
		rowClasses: [
			],
		actions: [
			//{caption: "More actions...", name: ''},
			//{caption: "Remove selected tiddlers from list", name: 'delete'}
			]
	},
	tiddlers : [],
	HomeSection : [],
	ListViewSection : [],
	AddToListSection : [],
	
	handler : function( place, macroName, params, wikifier, paramString, tiddler )
	{
		this.HomeSection = place;
		var newsection = createTiddlyElement( null, "div", null, "MTE_AddTag" );
		createTiddlyText(newsection, "Tiddler Tags to edit: ");
		var input = createTiddlyElement( null, "input", null, "txtOptionInput" );
		input.type = "text";
		input.size = 50;
		newsection.appendChild( input );
		newsection.inputBox = input;
		createTiddlyButton( newsection, this.AddToListLabel, this.AddToListPrompt, this.onAddToList, null, null, null );
		createTiddlyButton( newsection, "Clear List", this.addtoListPrompt, this.onClear, null, null, null );
		createTiddlyElement( newsection, "br" );
		createTiddlyElement( newsection, "br" );
		this.AddToListSection = newsection;
	        this.HomeSection.appendChild( newsection );

		newsection = createTiddlyElement( null, "div", null, "MTE_addtag" );
		createTiddlyButton( newsection, "Add Tag", "Add tag to all listed tiddlers", this.onAddTag, null, null, null );
		var input = createTiddlyElement( null, "input", null, "txtOptionInput" );
		input.type = "text";
		input.size = 50;
		newsection.appendChild( input );
		newsection.inputBox = input;
		createTiddlyElement( newsection, "br" );
		this.AddTagSection = newsection;
	        this.HomeSection.appendChild( newsection );

		newsection = createTiddlyElement( null, "div", null, "MTE_removetag" );
		createTiddlyButton( newsection, "Remove Tag", "Remove tag from all listed tiddlers", this.onRemoveTag, null, null, null );
		var input = createTiddlyElement( null, "input", null, "txtOptionInput" );
		input.type = "text";
		input.size = 50;
		newsection.appendChild( input );
		newsection.inputBox = input;
		createTiddlyElement( newsection, "br" );
		this.RemoveTagSection = newsection;
	        this.HomeSection.appendChild( newsection );

		this.ListViewSection = createTiddlyElement( null, "div", null, "MTE_listview" );
		this.HomeSection.appendChild( this.ListViewSection );
		ListView.create( this.ListViewSection, this.tiddlers, this.listViewTemplate, null );

	},


	ResetListView : function()
	{
		ListView.forEachSelector( config.macros.MTE.ListViewSection, function( e, rowName )
		{
			if( e.checked )
			{
				var title = e.getAttribute( "rowName" );
				var tiddler = config.macros.MTE.tiddlers.findByField( "title", title );
				tiddler.Selected = 1;
			}
		});
		config.macros.MTE.HomeSection.removeChild( config.macros.MTE.ListViewSection );
		config.macros.MTE.ListViewSection = createTiddlyElement( null, "div", null, "MTE_listview" );
		config.macros.MTE.HomeSection.appendChild( config.macros.MTE.ListViewSection );
		ListView.create( config.macros.MTE.ListViewSection, config.macros.MTE.tiddlers, config.macros.MTE.listViewTemplate, config.macros.MTE.onSelectCommand);
	},

	onAddToList : function()
	{
		store.forEachTiddler( function ( title, tiddler )
		{
			var tags = config.macros.MTE.AddToListSection.inputBox.value.readBracketedList();
			if (( tiddler.tags.containsAll( tags ))  && ( config.macros.MTE.tiddlers.findByField( "title", title ) == null ))
			{
				var t = store.getTiddlerSlices( title, ["Name", "Description", "Version", "CoreVersion", "Date", "Source", "Author", "License", "Browsers"] );
				t.title = title;
				t.tiddler = tiddler;
				t.text = tiddler.text.substr(0,50);
				t.tags = tiddler.tags;
				config.macros.MTE.tiddlers.push(t);
			}
		});
		config.macros.MTE.ResetListView();
	},

	onClear : function()
	{
		config.macros.MTE.tiddlers = [];
		config.macros.MTE.ResetListView();
	},

	onAddTag : function( e )
	{
		var selectedRows = [];
		ListView.forEachSelector(config.macros.MTE.ListViewSection, function( e, rowName )
		{
			if( e.checked )
				selectedRows.push( e.getAttribute( "rowName" ));
		});
		var tag = config.macros.MTE.AddTagSection.inputBox.value;
		for(t=0; t < config.macros.MTE.tiddlers.length; t++)
		{
			if ( selectedRows.indexOf( config.macros.MTE.tiddlers[t].title ) != -1 )
				store.setTiddlerTag( config.macros.MTE.tiddlers[t].title, true, tag);
		}
		config.macros.MTE.ResetListView();
	},

	onRemoveTag : function( e )
	{
		var selectedRows = [];
		ListView.forEachSelector(config.macros.MTE.ListViewSection, function( e, rowName )
		{
			if( e.checked )
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<html><h2>My Other Car is a Bright Green City</h2><a href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives/007800.html">http://www.worldchanging.com/archives/007800.html</a><br><br>
<p class="byline"><a href="http://www.worldchanging.com/alex_bio.html">Alex Steffen</a><br>January 23, 2008  5:06 PM</p>
<br>
						<div class="blogarticletext">







<p><i>Today's cars are costly, dangerous and an ecological nightmare.
What if the solution to the problems they create, though, has more to
do with where we live than what we drive?</i></p>

<p><i>This is a rough draft of a long essay about why I believe
building compact communities should be one of America's highest
environmental priorities, and why, in fact, our obsession with building
greener cars may be obscuring some fundamental aspects of the problem
and some of the benefits of using land-use change as a primary
sustainability solution.</i></p>

<p><i>It's very rough in some places. But I'd like to put it out there
as an opportunity for discussion, and hopefully all you smart folks can
help me make it better. So, what do you think about this issue and how
can I improve this piece?</i></p>

<p><i>Thanks,</i></p>

<p><i>Alex</i></p>

<p><br>
I. The Truth About Cars</p>

<p>Recently, I gave a talk at the IDSA conference, and, as it happened,
my talk followed a presentation from the folks at Tesla, sharing the
design process of their electric sports car, <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives/005118.html">the Tesla Roadster</a>.</p>

<p>Since I was there to talk about sustainability, and was talking to a
big room full of designers, I tried to lay out how serious our
environmental predicament has become, and how much we'll need to change
if we want to steer clear of ecological catastrophe. Along the way, I
shared a few of the reasons why I thought the Roadster, though
undoubtedly cool, went nowhere near far enough to be called sustainable.</p>

<p>The response surprised me. After my talk, scores of people
approached me or emailed me to ask, in generally polite tones, what the
hell I was talking about? How could a car that gets 135 mpg-equivalent
not be a major harbinger of sustainability?</p>

<p>Because the answer to the problem of the American car is not under
the hood, and we're not going to find a bright green future by looking
there.</p>

<p><br>
II. A Brief Digression About the Nature of the Problem</p>

<p>The U.S. economy, as currently configured, is destroying the planet.
We are responsible for the lion's share of a great many global
problems, including being both <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//007108.html">the largest historical carbon polluter and the leading source of global emissions today</a></p>

<p>In addition, for the several billion people in the developing world
who are rapidly climbing out of poverty, our lifestyles are the measure
of prosperity. If they replicate the American way of life several
billion more times, our goose is cooked. The natural systems on which
we depend cannot survive the tidal wave of pollution and ecosystem
degradation it would take to enrich billions of people using current
technologies, designs and lifestyle choices. And we're not going to
talk people out of pursuing a more affluent life: it's insane to think
that we can talk them out of pursuing affluence while we waste our way
to wealth. If we're serious about saving the planet, we need to help
them create better alternatives.</p>

<p>The single best way we can do that is to lead by example. By
embracing our own models of sustainably prosperous living, we would do
two things: we'd help change the cultural messaging about what
prosperity really means, and we'd create some (perhaps many) of
technologies and designs other countries will need to invent their own
models. More importantly, we'd show that we're taking responsibility
for the massive burden we're already placing on the planet, and show
that we're again willing to show leadership on global issues. That
alone might lead to reinvigorated global negotiations on a whole host
of key problems.</p>

<p>So we need a one-planet America and we need it quickly. People hold
differing views about what one-planet and quickly mean, but as we
better grasp the nature of our predicament, it seems more and more
likely that if we want to unveil our model in time for other countries
to follow suit, we need to be living it by 2030, and if we take
seriously the voices I find most credible on issues of climate change,
ecosystem services and the like, that new model needs to reduce our
greenhouse gas emissions by 80-90%, drop our raw materials flows by a
comparable amount, preserve ecosystem functions across broad swathes of
the landscape and dramatically decrease the volume of toxic chemicals
finding their way into our soil, air and water.</p>

<p>Lots of argument can (and will be) had about all of these goals. No
one really knows for sure yet. But I am increasingly confident that
these are in the right ball-park and may even prove to be moderate to
conservative targets.</p>

<p><br>
III. Fixating on the Tailpipe</p>

<p><img src="http://www.worldchanging.com/2005_greenhouse.gif" and="" align="right" height="301" hspace="5" vspace="5" width="301">Transportation
generates over a quarter of U.S. greenhouse gases, according to the
E.P.A.. A portion of that comes from moving freight around, but over
20% is personal transportation, and the vast majority of that is
auto-related. In the Western states, the picture is even more severe.
Researcher and ally Eric de Place<a target="new" href="http://www.sightline.org/daily_score/archive/2008/01/08/wci-and-transportation-fuels">says</a>, "More than half of all fossil fuel emissions in the WCI states come from transportation."</p>

<p>Our vehicle emissions are a major climate change contributor, but
what comes out of the tailpipe is only a fraction of the total climate
impact of driving a car, and the climate impact is in turn only a part
of the environmental and social damage cars cause. Improving mileage
will not fix these problems.</p>

<p>Don't get me wrong: we absolutely need to drive down tailpipe emissions. Teresa Zhang of UC Berkeley, in a <a target="new" href="http://repositories.cdlib.org/lma/gmg/zhang_05_1/">recent environmental analysis of the average American car</a>
(PDF), found that the tailpipe emissions from the average car alone
equal 50% of a one-planet footprint. "The actual footprint," she notes,
"may range from 30% to over 100% of one’s ecological budget,
corresponding to fuel efficiencies between 55 mpg and 12 mpg." And
automotive emissions are still going up. So we can see the importance
of cars that get the energy equivalent of 135 mpg.</p>

<p><br>
IV. Beyond the Tailpipe</p>

<p>We want to drop tailpipe emissions (more on this later), but the
exhaust we're spewing is really only the beginning of the story. We
can't see most of the ecological and social impacts of our
auto-dependence in our daily lives. And those impacts are so massive
that arguing about fuel efficiency standards (especially in terms of
gradual increases) fails to acknowledge what we're up against with this
crisis.</p>

<p>First, there are the other non-exhaust direct impacts of the cars
themselves. Studies appear to show that between fifteen and twenty-two
percent of all the energy ever consumed by a vehicle is used in its
manufacture; the sources disagree, but the procurement of the materials
used to make and maintain that car (and then dispose of it at the end
of its life) may mean that almost half of the direct climate impact of
a car never comes out of its tailpipe. (For an excellent discussion of
the difficulty of assessing these numbers, check out the comments on
Erica's <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives/007492.html">Prius post</a>.)</p>

<p>This illustration handily demonstrates some of the inputs and impacts of the average car's lifecycle:</p>

<p>[[ILLO #2 to come]]</p>

<p>Second, lest we suffer from <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//005019.html">carbon         blindness</a>,
it's worth stopping to consider all the car-related pollution that has
little or nothing to do with energy used to make or move that car. </p>

<p>Road-building itself disrupts watershed hydrology. The crappy cars
we drive today spew toxins in every direction -- motor oil leaks,
lubricants burn, brakes wear away, particulates are thrown off the
engine, batteries erode. Then, too, keeping roads clear involves road
salt and roadside herbicides. As a leading study explains, "The
Washington Department of Transportation estimates that meeting its
stormwater runoff water quality and flood control requirements will
cost $75 to $220 million a year in increased capital and operating
costs," while the cost of the water polluted by cars in the U.S. alone</p>

<blockquote><i>"totals $29 billion per year ... Note that this estimate
excludes costs of residual runoff, shoreline damage, leaking
underground storage tanks,reduced groundwater recharge and increased
flooding due to pavement, so it is considered a conservative value."</i></blockquote>

<p>With a massive network of roads and an average of more than three <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//001861.html">parking spaces</a> per car (less in dense cities, more in the suburbs), auto-focused transportation infrastructure contributes mightily to the <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//001861.html">heat island effect</a>, which worsens air quality and increases energy used on <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives/007800.html">air conditioning</a>.
And while asphalt that uses lighter-colored rocks can offer some
relief, the basic problem is the amount of paved surface itself, and
cars demand the most pavement per person of any form of transportation
-- (by the way, anyone got a link to one of those photos or graphs
comparing the amount of pavement needed by 100 people driving, walking
and taking the bus?)</p>

<p>But, water and ecosystem impacts aside, what about the indirect
climate impacts of all that road-building? A study quoted in the 9/05
issue of the Journal of Urban Planning and Development estimates that
the greenhouse gasses emitted while building and maintaining roads add
an additional 45% to the average car's annual climate footprint. And we
continue to build roads at a rapid rate, all across North America. Even
many <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//001376.html">shrinking cities</a> are seeing road-building on their suburban fringes increase.</p>

<p><br>
V. Why Emissions Are Still Growing</p>

<p>The difficulty of tackling automotive climate emissions was
highlighted recently here in Seattle, where, in advance of the US
Conference of Mayors climate change summit, the City of Seattle
released <a target="new" href="http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/337254_climate30.html">a major report detailing Seattle's progress towards attaining Kyoto</a>.
In general, Seattle should be at least a little proud, having cut
emissions in all sorts of sectors. We're a long way from bright green,
but we're making progress.</p>

<p>Except in transportation. Specifically, car and truck emissions. There, <a target="new" href="http://slog.thestranger.com/2007/10/things_the_mayor_doesnt_mention_1">emissions actually grew</a>. In fact, given recent and predicted growth in auto emissions, <a target="new" href="http://slog.thestranger.com/2007/10/more_bad_news_from_the_citys_climate_stu">Seattle is actually losing ground on climate change</a>. Worse still? Those numbers don't even begin to count indirect climate costs: all they count is tailpipe exhaust.</p>

<p>But Seattle shouldn't feel bad. Across much or North America,<a target="new" href="http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/local/bal-te.md.climate21sep21,0,7126310.story">more people are driving more cars farther and more often</a>:</p>

<blockquote><i>"The number of miles Americans drive has grown three
times faster than the population since 1980, and twice as fast as the
increase in vehicle registrations... The U.S. Energy Information
Administration projects total miles driven to increase by 59 percent by
2030, which the report's authors say would cancel out whatever
reductions in carbon dioxide might be achieved by improving the gas
mileage of cars and trucks."</i></blockquote>

<p>All that driving takes some pretty big social tolls, too, of course.
Car accidents are a leading cause of death and disabling injury in the
U.S. Auto-dependence is a major contributor to obesity and other
chronic illness. In addition, more and more people are finding
themselves driving longer commutes: more than 3.5 million Americans now
drive more than three hours a day to get to and from work, spending a
month of their lives on the road each year. Meanwhile, people who live
in the newer fringe-burbs are reportedly the least happiest of
Americans, and <a target="new" href="http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/05_08/b3921127.htm">the long commutes they endure are a major reason why</a> </p>

<blockquote><i>This is what economists call "the commuting paradox."
Most people travel long distances with the idea that they'll accept the
burden for something better, be it a house, salary, or school. They
presume the trade-off is worth the agony. But studies show that
commuters are on average much less satisfied with their lives than
noncommuters. A commuter who travels one hour, one way, would have to
make 40% more than his current salary to be as fully satisfied with his
life as a noncommuter, say economists Bruno S. Frey and Alois Stutzer
of the University of Zurich's Institute for Empirical Research in
Economics. People usually overestimate the value of the things they'll
obtain by commuting -- more money, more material goods, more prestige
-- and underestimate the benefit of what they are losing: social
connections, hobbies, and health. "Commuting is a stress that doesn't
pay off," says Stutzer.</i></blockquote>

<p>We're driving farther and farther, we're less and less happy, and we're melting the ice caps. Yay!</p>

<p><br>
VI. What We Build Dictates How We Get Around, and More</p>

<p>Our efforts to build a one-planet prosperity may involve an
astonishing variety of new approaches, but in the U.S., we most need to
adopt one solution that leverages almost all the others: stop sprawl
and build well-designed compact communities. That's because the
land-use patterns in our communities dictate not only how much we
drive, but how sustainable we're able to be on all sort of fronts.</p>

<p>Sprawled-out land uses generate enormous amounts of automotive greenhouse gasses. A recent major study, <a target="new" href="http://smartgrowthamerica.org/gcindex.html">Growing Cooler</a>,
makes the point clearly: if 60 percent of new developments were even
modestly more compact, we'd emit 85 million fewer metric tons of
tailpipe CO2 each year by 2030 -- as much as would be saved by raising
the national mileage standards to 32 mpg.</p>

<p><img src="http://www.worldchanging.com/images/2006/05/city-dwellers-emit-less-co2-for-transport.gif" and="" align="right" height="width=" hspace="5" vspace="5">In
other words, there is a direct relationship between the kinds of places
we live, the transportation choices we have, and how much we drive. The
best car-related innovation we have is not to improve the car, but
eliminate the need to drive it everywhere we go.</p>

<p>And the amount of density the study's authors call for is extremely
modest. They encourage building new projects at a density of 13 homes
per acre, raising the average national density from 7.6 units per acre
to 9 an acre.</p>

<p>To give you a sense of how gentle a goal that is, consider this: the
turn-of-the-century Garden City suburbs, with their generous lawns,
winding streets and tree-lined boulevards averaged 12 units an acre.
New Urbanist suburbs, not particularly dense, weigh in at 15-30 units
per acre. Traditional town house blocks have as many as 36 homes per
acre. Parts of Manhattan, I've read, can reach 160 units per acre, but
even without crowding together high-rises, many extremely livable parts
of Vancouver have 40 homes per acre.</p>

<p>And we're getting better and better at designing density that works. We're finally rediscovering the art of <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//007055.html">placemaking</a>,
learning to build dense communities with plenty of open space,
welcoming public places, thriving neighborhood retail and a tangible
sense of place. Some of this is technical: understanding that
surrounding neighborhood cores that have lots of people, many homes,
shops and offices, with less dense but walkable residential areas can
make for places that actually feel far more livable and relaxed than
most conventional new suburbs (of course, <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//004739.html">compact communities are also safer</a>). Good compact communities offer an outstanding quality of life (on that, more below).</p>

<p>In other words, we know that density reduces driving. We know that
we're capable of building really dense new neighborhoods and even of
using good design, infill development and infrastructure investments to
transform existing medium-low density neighborhoods into walkable
compact communities. Creating communities dense enough to save those 85
million metric tons of tailpipe emissions is (politics aside) easy. It
is within our power to go much farther: to build whole metropolitan
regions where the vast majority of residents live in communities that
eliminate the <i>need</i> for daily driving, and make it possible for many people to live without private cars altogether.</p>

<p><br>
VII. Deadlines and Realism</p>

<p>Some people make the argument that the built environment is much
harder to change than the design of cars -- after all, don't we buy a
new car every few years and a new home at most a few times in our
lives? But the reality is not so clear.</p>

<p>Generally, we think of cars as things which are quickly replaced in
our society, and buildings as things which rarely change. But that will
not be the case over the next few decades. Because of population
growth, the on-going development churn in cities (buildings remodeled
or replaced, etc.), <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//004846.html">infrastructure projects</a> and changing tastes, we'll be rebuilding <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//007475.html">half our built environment</a> between now and 2030. Done right, that new construction could enable a complete overhaul of the American city. </p>

<p>This is especially true since we don't need to change every home to
transform a neighborhood. Many inner-ring suburban neighborhoods, for
instance, can become terrific places simply by allowing infill and
converting strip-mall arterials to walkable mixed-use streets. This
transition can happen in a few years.</p>

<p>In comparison, I've been told that it takes at least 16 years to
replace 90% of our automotive fleet, and since it takes years to move a
design from prototype to production, it looks likely that the cars <i>most</i>
people in the US have available to them to drive in 2030 will not be
all that different from the more efficient cars today -- I'm optimistic
that we'll have at least some radically engineered, non-toxic,
fully-recyclable electric cars on the road by then, but it's extremely
unlikely that (barring massive government intervention) they'll be
anything like the norm. We should not sit waiting for automobile design
to fix this problem (again, more on this below).</p>

<p>There's no need to wait on building bright green cities. Better
design solutions for buildings, communities and, in many cases,
infrastructure either <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//007765.html">already exist or are mid-development</a>.
If we spend the next 20 years developing compact neighborhoods with
green buildings and smart infrastructure, we can reduce the ecological
impacts of American prosperity by jumps that are now somewhat hard to
imagine.</p>

<p>And new innovation is exploding. Consider <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//004301.html">walkshed technologies</a>,
all those great mapping, locating and imaging tools that are helping to
make substituting proximity for mobility more practical. <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//006955.html">Tools that let us map information over space</a> have other benefits as well, though, facilitating as they do <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//006737.html">product-service systems</a>, the dematerialization of retail impacts through <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//004932.html">home delivery</a>, <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//006571.html">ride-sharing</a>, greatly facilitated producer take-backs, <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//003182.html">smart energy grids</a>, <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//007622.html">telework</a>, even <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//007543.html">backstory activism</a>.
Taken together, these tech-powered innovations have the potential to
rewrite the way urban people relate to their stuff, potentially in
dramatically novel ways.</p>

<p>Car-sharing is the best-known and perhaps most illustrative example,
but it's far from the only one. Take, for instance, Barcelona's <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//007672.html">phenomenally successful Bicing program</a>, made feasible by cheap technology:</p>

<blockquote><i>Once you register with the company (you have to be a
resident of Barcelona, and it costs 24 euros) and activate your swipe
card, you can use any one of Bicing's 1,500 bikes, which are designed
to prevent people from stealing parts, and to be recognizable. The
first 30 minutes of every trip are free, and you can return your bike
to any Bicing location around the city (there are at least 100)--one
key improvement on car-sharing services, which typically require a user
to return the car to the location where he or she picked it up. Every
half-hour over the initial free half-hour costs 30 eurocents, making
Bicing the cheapest public transport system in Barcelona. You can keep
any one bike for up to two hours, and you can always return a bike, run
your errand, and grab another for no charge. The bikes seem to be very
well-maintained, and everyone uses them—old people, little kids,
teenagers on cell phones--everyone.</i></blockquote>

<p>Wired urban living might very well soon evolve into a series of
systems for letting us live affluent, convenient lives without actually
owning a lot of things. If cities are engines for creating social
connections, walkshed technologies might be said to make those
connections into tools for trumping the hassle of owning stuff with the
pleasure of using stuff to get the vivid experiences and deep
relationships we crave. If that happens, we'll have a major leverage
point to work with.</p>

<p><br>
VIII. Transit Rises Again!</p>

<p>In well-designed, 21st century cities, we can even breathe life into
some older technologies.For instance, when it comes to tranporting
yourself from one place to another, <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//007335.html">it's pretty hard to beat the ecological efficiency of public transit</a>.
Transit in the U.S. tends be expensive to build, inefficient and often
unpleasant. Good design and new ideas can change that, though.</p>

<p>Most roads in the U.S. don't pay their way: <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//007598.html">drivers are subsidized</a> to a much larger tune than public transit riders (especially when <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//006048.html">externalized costs are counted</a>). But it doesn't have to be that way.<a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//007451.html">Road tolls</a>, parking taxes and <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//004781.html">congestion pricing</a>
can serve a double purpose -- disincentivizing driving while generating
enough funds to pay for new, comfortable and effective transit
services. We can afford a serious shift towards transit, especially
since oil production is peaking, and a turn to both dirtier and more
expensive fossil fuel sources (coal, tar sands, etc.) seems to be the
future of automotive fuels (biofuels not being much of a sustainable
option in the near-medium term, for reasons we've discussed here
before). Given full-cost accounting, transit actually already pays off
in a great many urban settings.</p>

<p>Transit and smart environments might actually even help us solve the challenge of moving freight through crowded city streets. <a target="new" href="http://www.citycargo.nl/index_eng.htm">CityCargo</a>
has a brilliant scheme to use city tram or light rail tracks to
distribute cargo as well, this increasing their efficiency and saving
money. They've already been working on trials in the Netherlands, and
(according to a conversation I had with CEO Michael Hendriks when I was
in Amsterdam) apparently learning rapidly, but the basic idea is
simple: freight is delivered to the edges of the city; freight trams
pick up the cargo and distribute it to various hubs, where small
electric trucks deliver it to the recipients. Now, it, obviously won't
work where rails don't exist or where the freight is too large, but <a target="new" href="http://www.citycargo.nl/voordelen_eng.htm">the advantages are real</a> and it seems to me that it's a great illustration of how much innovation is possible even in traditional transit systems.</p>

<p><br>
IX. Compact Communities Are More Efficient and Thus Cheaper Places to Live</p>

<p>When you build closer together, you also create the conditions for dramatic energy and cost savings. Researchers at Brookings <a target="new" href="http://www.brookings.edu/metro/umi/ctod_page.htm">note</a>:</p>

<blockquote><i>Transportation costs are a significant part of the
average household budget. The average transportation expenditures for
the median income household in the US in 2003 was 19.1%, —the highest
expenditure after housing.</i></blockquote>

<p>But that 19.1% figure is the <i>median</i>. How much individual households spend varies enormously, and how much we pay for transportation <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//004732.html">is determined largely by the location of our homes</a>.
People who are living in extremely dense areas, getting around mostly
on foot, by bike and by transit, with the occasional use of a carshare
vehicle (an increasingly popular lifestyle), can find themselves paying
a small fraction of that 19.1%.</p>

<p>What's more, the public burdens created by car-free or car-light
lifestyles are so minimal that some municipalities (like Seattle), are
actually finding that it makes good fiscal sense to encourage people to
give up their cars by subsidizing transit passes and car-sharing
memberships.</p>

<p>People in compact urban areas also pay substantially less in other energy costs. As we've discussed frequently before, <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//003034.html">dense neighborhoods are far more energy efficient than even "green" sprawl already</a>
and all the innovation trends seem to me to benefit compact
development. Carbon taxes can incentivize even more energy-efficient
developments <a target="new" href="http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/news/1194497715108680.xml&amp;coll=7&amp;thispage=1">as they may soon in Portland</a>.</p>

<p>Density is not just green, it's blue. Studies show that urban dwellers tend not only to use less water overall, but <a target="new" href="http://oikos.com/news/2006/02.html">generate less water runoff per person</a>:</p>

<blockquote><i>[T]he study found that higher-density scenarios generate
less storm water runoff per house at all scales - one acre, lot, and
watershed - and time series build-out examples. For the same amount of
development, the EPA says, higher-density development produces less
runoff and less impervious cover than low-density development. For a
given amount of growth, the agency found, lower-density development
impacts more of the watershed.</i></blockquote>

<p>Given that water supply and water integrity are huge issues now, and
that both the pumping of water from distant sources and the treatment
and control of storm water are not inconsequential contributors to our
climate emissions as a nation, this is worth paying attention to.</p>

<p>Finally, there's another angle here that we shouldn't be too
delicate to mention: compact communities are better able to support the
kinds of distributed infrastructure that lends itself to <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//004918.html">neighborhood survivability</a>
and disaster resilience. Long Emergency fantasies of small-town
independence are just that -- fantasies, especially when overlaid on
big-lot suburbs of the exurban fringe. There are very few systemic
advantages and many liabilities out in McMansion-land, whereas walkable
communities with distributed infrastructure and close proximity to
emergency services can actually offer quite a bit of resilience. But
enough about that.</p>

<p>[[The usual retort to these common-sense arguments is that far-flung
suburbs offer such a superior quality of life that we'll never curb
sprawl or pry commuters out of their cars, but, even more to the point,
the existence of affluent, car-dependent, large-lot suburbs is just the
voice of the people, speaking out their desires. Any opposition to its
unhindered continuation is not only government interference in the free
market, such people (usually development lobbies and right-wing think
tanks) say, it's downright social engineering.</p>

<p>[[Which is nonsense, of course. The upper-middle class American
McMansion suburb is one of the most socially engineered and publicly
subsidized settlement patterns on the Earth. I won't bother to go into
the arguments here, since a whole flotilla of books, reports, and
journalistic investigations has flayed the "free market choice" talking
point alive. If you're interested, you can go look it up.]]</p>

<p><br>
X. Tailpipe solutions </p>

<p>At first glance, prospects for a green car look promising. But when
we look deeper, we begin to see that there are severe limits to how far
we can go with "personal mobility upgrades", and how fast we can get
there.</p>

<p>I'm deeply skeptical of the possibility of a techno-fix here, but
I'm going to do my best to act like a believer and try to spin a
scenario in which we come up with a green car.</p>

<p>Here's what we need: a very-low carbon vehicle, with a rapidly
shrinking materials and toxics footprint, that reduces rather than
increases the need for purely automotive infrastructure (e.g., parking
space, freeways), and that, ideally, reduces the cost burden on regular
people.</p>

<p>To my mind, the only green car approach that has a chance of
reducing its carbon footprint enough is the plug-in hybrid (or
"pluggie" as I like to think of it).</p>

<p>The arguments are many and complex, and there are a lot of uncertainties. As Alan Durning <a target="new" href="http://sightline.org/daily_score/archive/2007/11/14/car-ful-car-less-32">reminds us</a>:</p>

<blockquote><i>"Plug-in hybrid-electric cars hold great promise, as
long as we can fix the laws. And the technology. Oh, and the price.
None of those fixes are gimmes. Without the first—and specifically,
without a legal cap on greenhouse gases—plug-ins could actually do more
harm than good. And without the second two fixes—working technology and
competitive prices—plug-ins won’t spread beyond the Hollywood set."</i></blockquote>

<p>These are all huge challenges. That said, I think Joseph Romm sums it up well enough for scrimmage <a target="new" href="http://climateprogress.org/2008/01/21/plug-in-hybrids-and-electric-cars-a-core-climate-solution-nationally-and-globally/">here</a> when he says:</p>

<blockquote><i>Transportation is the toughest sector in which to
achieve deep carbon emissions reductions. Of the three major
alternative fuels that could plausibly provide a low-carbon substitute
for a significant amount of petroleum:
</i><p><i>    * I am excited about the near-term reality (next five years) of plug in hybrids and electric cars.<br>
* I am hopeful that cellulosic biofuels could be a medium-term strategy
rather than a long-term one, especially for long-distance travel by
air, sea, and land (which batteries probably can't handle).<br>
    * I am increasingly convinced hydrogen fuel cell cars are a dead end...</i></p></blockquote>

<p>There are a lot of reasons to love pluggies. <i>(Note to self: Stop trying to make pluggies happen!)</i> The best, though, is that plug-ins are ideally suited for creating a distributed vehicle-to-grid system.</p>

<p>With vehicle-to-grid systems, our cars not only recharge themselves
from a smart-grid, they become the back-up storage batteries for that
grid, shaving off the peak demand that (the coal lobby says) demands we
build a fleet of new and dirty coal power plants. The operative concept
here is "smart garages" where our <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//006226.html">plug-in hybrid electrics</a>
recharge when not in use, offering increased storage capacity to the
grid and thus lowering the amount of generation capacity power
companies need to keep on hand for the peak surges. In other words,
enough plug-in cars could actually reduce power company emissions. It
could also save the utility money: RMI estimates that reduction in
peak-demand to be worth about $600 a car!</p>

<p>And, of course, things get even more interesting if the <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//003990.html">smart grid</a>
the cars are plugged into includes significant amounts of distributed
energy, which I am confident is going to continue to look like a better
and better investment in places with abundant sunshine, regular winds
and the like. (For more on the whole vehicle-to-grid concept, it's
worth watching the video <a target="new" href="http://jcwinnie.biz/wordpress/?page_id=2514">The Smart Garage: The Fleet Meets the Grid in a Carbon Constrained World</a>.) Check out the graph:</p>

<p>But, remember, this option demands a set of technologies that is at
best new and at worst not available; a massive shift towards renewable
energy; the development of more distributed energy; the recreation of
electrical utilities around the country to support smart grids and net
metering; and finding some way to swap out cars more quickly that the
current 16-year cycle -- without just sending those cars to the
developing world!</p>

<p>And the pollution from a car isn't limited to its emissions and leakages. That new car smell? <a target="new" href="http://www.usatoday.com/money/autos/2005-09-26-new-car-smell_x.htm">Toxic.</a>
We currently have no replacements for most of the bad components, and
while green chemistry appears from casual observation to be asking some
great questions about non-harmful industrial lubricants and the like,
and nanotechnology I'm told, may well deliver more precise and thus
less polluting engines, filters, bearings, etc., we are still a long
way from a non-toxic car or any kind.</p>

<p>We don't appear to be much closer to a truly recyclable car. William McDonough &amp; Michael Braungart <a target="new" href="http://www.mcdonough.com/writings/c2c_design.htm">articulate the challenge thus</a>:</p>

<blockquote><i>"Building a truly sustainable automobile industry means
developing closed-loop systems for the manufacturing and re-utilization
of auto parts. In Europe, the End-of-Life Vehicle Directive, which
makes manufacturers responsible for automotive materials, is
encouraging companies to consider design for disassembly and effective
resource recovery more seriously. Cradle-to-cradle systems, in which
materials either go back to industry or safely back to the soil, are
built for effective resource recovery. In such a system, each part of
every car is either returned to the soil or recovered and reused in the
assembly of new cars, generating extraordinary productivity and
consistent employment."</i></blockquote>

<p>The best try of which I'm aware is the <a target="new" href="http://media.ford.com/article_display.cfm?article_id=14047">Model U</a>,
McDonough's collaboration with Ford, which is an interesting start, but
a long, long way from a closed-loop car. (If anyone a better example,
by the way, I'd love a pointer.)</p>

<p>That said, there are a bunch of smart folks hard at work on these
issues, and some enormous stakes are being laid. Wired has a truly
excellent story describing the <a target="new" href="http://www.wired.com/cars/futuretransport/magazine/16-01/ff_100mpg?currentPage=all">Automotive X-Prize</a>,
$10M for the winner of a race between 100-mpg prototype cars. And some
pretty exciting designs are already on the way, cars that are
definitely a big step forward, even if not a giant leap. For instance,
"Aptera plans to introduce its vehicle — a three-wheeled electric
two-seater with a 120-mile range and room in back for a surfboard — by
year's end. Price tag: $26,000 to $29,000."</p>

<p>Some real wildcards are in play as well, like the collaborative efforts of <a target="new" href="http://www.vehicledesignsummit.org/website/">the Vehicle Design Summit</a>, whose mission is</p>

<blockquote><i>[T]he global consortium will design, build and bring to
market the VDS Vision 200, a hyper-efficient 4-6 passenger vehicle
earmarked for India that will demonstrate a 95% reduction in embodied
energy, materials and toxicity from cradle-to-cradle-to-grave.</i></blockquote>

<p>They claim they'll have the whole thing on the streets by August.
I'm really skeptical of that timeline (though fully supportive of the
goal). If we can, in fact get such a car on the streets quickly, then
we have more room for a variety of transportation/land-use approaches.
However, citing the desire to build such a car as evidence that we
don't need to act on the basis of current reality seems to me to be
gambling with the future, a sort of transportation hail-mary.</p>

<p>We can see a sort of ecological footprint Pascal's wager here: if we
decide not to change our urban form and green cars arrive in time (and
all the other associated techno-fixes work out), we experience some
limited gains, mostly for people who now lead car-dependent lives and
don't have to change; if we don't change urban form and they don't
arrive, we've just willed our descendants a coupe thousand years of
climate chaos.</p>

<p><br>
XI. What If There Is No Real Downside?</p>

<p>On the other hand, what if we do change our urban form? I think
whether or not green cars arrive, building bright green cities is a
winning strategy: if the cars don't arrive, land-use change is clearly
needed to save our bacon; if they do arrive, they might well fit quite
nicely into the new fabric of sustainable urban life, and we're all
better off for it -- the air's that much cleaner, the grid that much
smarter, our economic advantage in clean technology that much greater.</p>

<p>Most arguments against land-use change presume that building compact
communities is a trade-off; that investing in getting walkable, denser
neighborhoods, we lose some or a lot of our affluence or quality of
life. What if that's not true, though? What if the gains actually far
outweigh the costs not only in ecological and fiscal terms, but in
lifestyle and prosperity terms as well? I think that's the case.</p>

<p>I believe that green compact communities, smaller well-built homes,
walkable streets and smart infrastructure can actually offer a far
better quality of life than living in McMansion hintersprawl in purely
material terms: more comfort, more security, more true prosperity. But
even more to the point, I believe they offer all sorts of
non-materialistic but extremely real benefits that suburbs cannot.
Opponents of smart growth talk about sacrificing our way of life -- but
it's not a sacrifice if what you get in exchange is superior.</p>

<p>Many people agree with me. Development expert <a target="new" href="http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//007679.html">Christopher B. Leinberger</a>
insists that we already have a market in which the majority of
consumers would prefer to live in compact communities, and that, in
fact, we are suffering a shortage of the kind of homes they want:
smaller homes in more walkable neighborhoods.</p>

<p>Given the 50 years of negative branding cities have gotten in
American popular media -- you know, gritty urban scenes of despair,
full of pollution, political corruption and crazy black men -- I
suspect that there's a lot more persuasion possible here. I suspect
that the vast majority of Americans would, given a chance to see the
merits of both in a clear light and knowing how much is at stake,
happily live urban lives or work to transform their existing
communities into more livable, sustainable places.</p>

<p>I think we need to not be ashamed to note that Sarah Susanka's
probably right when she says, "We are all searching for home, but we
are trying to find it by building more rooms and more space. Instead of
thinking about the quality of the spaces we live in, we tend to focus
on quantity. But a house is so much more than its size and volume,
neither of which has anything to do with comfort."</p>

<p>Just as a home is more than the building in which it resides, a life
is more than the stuff we pile up around it. We all know this to be
true. And it may just be that in building bright green cities we do
more than help avert a monstrous disaster for which we are larger
responsible, that in fact we may find that the fruit of our labors to
transform our footprints is, in fact, to transform ourselves, and we
might just awaken on the other side of this fight to find ourselves
prosperously at home in the sort of communities we thought lost
forever, leading more creative, connected and carefree lives.</p>

<p><i>(Illustration of Aptera from Wired article cited above.)</i><br>
</p>

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 <<tagging Journal>>
















<<haloscan comments>>



<<tagCloud>>
<html><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="20" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" align="left"><h1>Contents</h1></td></tr>
  <tr valign="top">
    <td width="50%">
      <h2><em>Why? (the notorious question)</em></h2>
      <ul><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssWhySS">Why
        ride single speed?</a> </li></ul><br>
      <h2><em>Single Speed Conversions</em></h2>
      <ul><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssConversionsHowTo">How
        do I convert my geared bike to single speed?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssConversionsRearHub">Will
        I need a new rear hub?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssConversionsChainTension">How
        do I tension the chain?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssConversionsRetrofits">Who
        does single speed frame modifications?</a> </li></ul><br>
      <h2><em>Gearing Selection</em></h2>
      <ul><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssGearingRatio">How
        do I determine the proper gear ratio for my single speed?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssGearingTools">Are
        there tools that can help me decide what gear ratio to use?</a>
      </li></ul><br>
      <h2><em>Single Speed Frame Types/Designs</em></h2>
      <ul><li><strong>EBBs (Eccentric Bottom Brackets)</strong>
        <ul><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssEbbDefined">What
          is an EBB (Eccentric Bottom Bracket)?</a>
          </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssEbbNewConcept">Are
          eccentrics a new concept?</a>
          </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssEbbTypes">Are
          all eccentric designs the same?</a>
          </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssEbbWhy">Why
          use an EBB (Eccentric Bottom Bracket) on a single speed?</a>
          </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssEbbLinearPull">Is
          there any reason to use an EBB (Eccentric Bottom Bracket) with
          linear-pull brakes?</a>
          </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssEbbCreaking">Will
          eccentrics creak?</a>
          </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssEbbRetrofit">Can
          my current frame be retrofitted to use an EBB (Eccentric Bottom
          Bracket)?</a> </li></ul><br>
        </li><li><strong>Track Fork Ends</strong> (often referred to
        <em>incorrectly</em> as "Horizontal Dropouts")
        <ul><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssForkEndsDefined">Are
          "Track Fork Ends" &amp; "Horizontal Dropouts" the same thing?</a>
          </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssForkEndsDisc">Are
          disc brakes compatible with Track Fork Ends?</a>
          </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssForkEndsRetrofit">Can
          Track Fork Ends be retrofitted to my current frame?</a> </li></ul><br>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssEbbVsForkEnds">Should
        I buy a frame with an EBB (Eccentric Bottom Bracket) or with Track Fork
        Ends?</a> </li></ul><br>
      <h2><em>Component Selection</em></h2>
      <ul><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssCompHubs">Which
        should I use...Freewheel vs. Cassette rear hub?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssCompForks">Is
        a rigid fork better (than a suspension fork) for single speeding?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssCompTensioners">How
        do I tension the chain?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssCompBars">Should
        I use wider bars on my single speed than I do on my geared bike?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssCompCranks">Will
        a longer crank set work better on a single speed than a "normal" length
        crank set?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssCompBrakes">Should
        I use linear-pull or disc brakes on my single speed?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssCompSSCog">For
        <em>cassette</em> rear hubs, will a BMX cog work better than a
        Hyperglide® cog removed from my cassette?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssCompSSChainrings">What
        is the difference between a standard chainring and a "single speed
        chainring"?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssCompSSChaintugs">What
        are chaintugs, and do I need them on my single speed?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssCompSSQuickRelease">Can
        I use quick release (QR) skewers on the rear wheel of my single speed,
        or do I need to use a solid axle with track nuts?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssCompSSTires">Where
        can I find comprehensive information on MTB tires?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssCompSSMfgrs">Which
        component manufacturers cater to the single speed market?</a>
      </li></ul><br></td>
    <td width="50%">
      <h2><em>Single Speed Manufacturer Listings</em></h2>
      <ul><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssMfgrsBikes">Single
        Speed Frame/Bicycle Manufacturers</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssMfgrsForks">Rigid
        Fork Manufacturers</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssMfgrsFreewheelHubs">Single
        Speed <em>Freewheel</em> Rear Hubs Manufacturers</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssMfgrsCassetteHubs">Single
        Speed <em>Cassette</em> Rear Hub Manufacturers</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssMfgrsTensioners">Single
        Speed Chain Tensioner Manufacturers</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssMfgrsOther">Other
        Single Speed Component Manufacturers</a> </li></ul><br>
      <h2><em>Troubleshooting</em></h2>
      <ul><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssTroubleshootingChainSkip">What
        is causing the chain to skip on my single speed?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssTroubleshootingChainDerailing">Why
        does the chain on my single speed keep derailing?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssTroubleshootingWheelSlip">Why
        is my rear wheel's axle slipping under load?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssTroubleshootingEBBCreak">Why
        is the EBB (Eccentric Bottom Bracket) on my frame creaking?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssTroubleshootingKneePain">Why
        do my knees hurt when I ride my single speed?</a> </li></ul><br>
      <h2><em>Miscellaneous SS Topics</em></h2>
      <ul><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssMiscFg">Is
        "fixed gear" the same thing as "single speed"?</a>
        </li><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssMisc4tooth">What
        is the "4-tooth rule"?</a> </li></ul><br>
      <h2><em>Single Speed Glossary</em></h2>
      <ul><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssGlossaryWhere">Where
        can I find a comprehensive glossary containing single speed (and other
        bicycle-related) terms &amp; definitions?</a> </li></ul><br>
      <h2><em>Single Speed FAQ Credits/Contributors</em></h2>
      <ul><li><a href="http://www.mtbr.com/faq/ssfaq.shtml#ssCredits">Who
        made this single speed FAQ page possible?</a>
</li></ul><br></td></tr></tbody></table><!-- ********************************************************************* --></html>
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Concerns over ABC Learning's dominance of childcare
	PRINT FRIENDLY 	EMAIL STORY
PM - Tuesday, 14 March , 2006  18:39:00
Reporter: Neal Woolrich
MARK COLVIN: The seemingly unstoppable rise of ABC childcare centres – no relation to this ABC that you're listening to of course - looks set to continue, as it prepares to swallow up one of its few remaining rivals.

ABC Learning and Kids' Campus have both been placed in a trading halt on the Stock Exchange and ABC is expected to announce yet another take-over.

It would leave ABC with more than 800 centres in Australia and New Zealand. Its next biggest rival has 93.

Neal Woolrich reports.

NEAL WOOLRICH: These days it seems the building blocks logos of ABC Learning Centres are dotted throughout suburbia.

The childcare operator aims to have 850 centres around Australia by June and if the latest market speculation is any guide, it's on track for another growth spurt.

Yesterday, ABC Learning and its rival, Kids Campus, were placed in a trading halt.

Kids Campus runs 101 centres in Australia but analysts are tipping they'll soon become another ABC acquisition.

It's another sign of ABC's ever-increasing dominance of the childcare market, where its nearest rival owns 93 centres.

Barbara Romeril is the Secretary of the National Association of Community Based Children's Services.

She says ABC's market power has gone too far.

BARBARA ROMERIL: We're deeply concerned about the corporatisation of childcare as ownership is concentrated into a smaller number of hands. We all know from our own experience that the best childcare is provided when communities are in control of the services that they use. To have services controlled by some distant head office is the antithesis of good childcare.

NEAL WOOLRICH: ABC's latest takeover attempt is likely to attract the attention of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission.

In 2004, ABC Learning engineered a merger with its largest rival, Peppercorn Management Group.

The National Association of Children's Services objected at the time, and Barbara Romeril says it will take its concerns to the competition watchdog if ABC swoops on Kids Campus.

BARBARA ROMERIL: The ACCC did conclude that that purchase left ABC with too big a dominance in some communities and ordered them to divest themselves of some centres. But ultimately they approved the merger.

We will be advising the ACCC this time that we have the same concerns about ABC merging with Kids Campus. It's going to give it an even bigger dominance and that's not in the best interest of babies and small children, families and the communities in which they live.

NEAL WOOLRICH: ABC's rise has been as spectacular as it's been swift. It was floated on the stock exchange four years ago for $25 million and is now worth $1.2 billion.

Its founder and Chief Executive Officer, Eddy Groves, is estimated by BRW to be worth $272 million.

Analysts say part of the company's success is due to the subsidies and tax rebates that childcare attracts.

The Government expects to spend more than $2 billion a year on childcare for the next four years.

But for all the taxpayer money that pours in, the National Association of Children's Services says it's going to the wrong places.

The Association's Secretary Barbara Romeril says the Federal Government isn't doing enough to promote community childcare.

BARBARA ROMERIL: The childcare benefit fee subsidy is quite helpful in making childcare affordable for many families, but low-income families need more financial support. That really should be targeted to the low-income families. And for a relatively small investment of capital funding added to that fee subsidy, the Government could get a much better outcome. They could get a high quality, community owned service in every community around the nation.

MARK COLVIN: The Secretary of the National Association of Children's Services Barbara Romeril with Neal Woolrich.

Source: [[PM - Concerns over ABC Learning's dominance of childcare|http://www.abc.net.au/pm/content/2006/s1591653.htm]]
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<html><h1 class="firstHeading">List of portable software</h1>
		
			<h3 id="siteSub">From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia</h3>
			
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<td class="ambox-text">The <b>inclusion or exclusion of items</b> from this list, or <b>length of this list</b> is disputed.<br>
<small>Please discuss this issue on the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:List_of_portable_software" title="Talk:List of portable software">talk page</a>.</small></td>
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<p><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portable_application" title="Portable application">Portable software</a> is a class of <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_program" title="Computer program">software</a> that is suitable for use on portable drives such as a <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_flash_drive" title="USB flash drive">USB (thumb) drive</a> or <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPod" title="IPod">iPod</a> or <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palm_%28PDA%29" title="Palm (PDA)">Palm PDA</a> with "drive mode", although any <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/External_hard_drive" class="mw-redirect" title="External hard drive">external hard drive</a> could theoretically be used. <sup id="_ref-0" class="reference"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#_note-0" title="">[1]</a></sup> <sup id="_ref-1" class="reference"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#_note-1" title="">[2]</a></sup>
The concept of carrying one's favored applications, utilities, and
files on a portable drive for use on any computer is one which has
evolved considerably in recent years.</p>
<p>Programs in this category (also known as <i>portable applications</i>) are typically 'lite' versions of their parent software, but there are many exceptions.</p>
<p>To be considered portable, for purpose of this list, a software program must:</p>
<ol><li>Not require any kind of formal installation onto a computer's
permanent storage device to be executed, and can be stored on a
removable storage device such as USB flash drive, enabling it to be
used on multiple computers.</li><li>Settings are stored with, and can be carried around with, the software (i.e., they are written to the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB" class="mw-redirect" title="USB">USB</a> drive).
<dl><dd>If the registry is used to store settings, the application's
configuration isn't portable, and must be set up on every PC it is used
on</dd></dl>
</li><li>Leaves a zero (or near-zero) "<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Footprint" title="Footprint">footprint</a>" on any PC it's run on after being used.
<dl><dd>i.e., All temporary files/registry settings should be removed once
the program has exited, and files created by the user can be saved
directly to the same removable media as the application is stored on.</dd></dl>
</li></ol>
<p>Generally, smaller <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utility" title="Utility">utility</a>/<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toolkit" title="Toolkit">toolkit</a>
software is inherently fairly portable; though larger applications are
sometimes changed in order to allow a portable versions to be released
(e.g., <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opera_%28Internet_suite%29" class="mw-redirect" title="Opera (Internet suite)">OperaUSB</a>).</p>
<dl><dd>
<div class="boilerplate metadata" id="listdev"><i>This is an <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Lists#Incomplete_lists" title="Wikipedia:WikiProject Lists">incomplete list</a>, which may never be able to satisfy certain standards for completeness.</i></div>
</dd><dd><span class="plainlinks selfreference"><i>Revisions and <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Citing_sources" title="Wikipedia:Citing sources">sourced</a> additions are welcome.</i></span></dd></dl>
<table id="toc" class="toc" summary="Contents">
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<h2>Contents</h2>
 <span class="toctoggle">[<a href="javascript:toggleToc()" class="internal" id="togglelink">hide</a>]</span></div>
<ul><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Application_launchers"><span class="tocnumber">1</span> <span class="toctext">Application launchers</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Development"><span class="tocnumber">2</span> <span class="toctext">Development</span></a>
<ul><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#IDEs"><span class="tocnumber">2.1</span> <span class="toctext">IDEs</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Scripting_Languages"><span class="tocnumber">2.2</span> <span class="toctext">Scripting Languages</span></a></li></ul>
</li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Graphics"><span class="tocnumber">3</span> <span class="toctext">Graphics</span></a>
<ul><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#3D_Modeling_And_Rendering"><span class="tocnumber">3.1</span> <span class="toctext">3D Modeling And Rendering</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Graphic_Editors"><span class="tocnumber">3.2</span> <span class="toctext">Graphic Editors</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Processing"><span class="tocnumber">3.3</span> <span class="toctext">Processing</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Viewers"><span class="tocnumber">3.4</span> <span class="toctext">Viewers</span></a></li></ul>
</li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Document_Based"><span class="tocnumber">4</span> <span class="toctext">Document Based</span></a>
<ul><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Office_and_Publishing"><span class="tocnumber">4.1</span> <span class="toctext">Office and Publishing</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Editors"><span class="tocnumber">4.2</span> <span class="toctext">Editors</span></a></li></ul>
</li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Educational"><span class="tocnumber">5</span> <span class="toctext">Educational</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Games"><span class="tocnumber">6</span> <span class="toctext">Games</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Internet"><span class="tocnumber">7</span> <span class="toctext">Internet</span></a>
<ul><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Web_browsers"><span class="tocnumber">7.1</span> <span class="toctext">Web browsers</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Email_clients"><span class="tocnumber">7.2</span> <span class="toctext">Email clients</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Instant_messaging"><span class="tocnumber">7.3</span> <span class="toctext">Instant messaging</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#FTP_clients"><span class="tocnumber">7.4</span> <span class="toctext">FTP clients</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Download_managers"><span class="tocnumber">7.5</span> <span class="toctext">Download managers</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#P2P_file_sharing"><span class="tocnumber">7.6</span> <span class="toctext">P2P file sharing</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#IRC"><span class="tocnumber">7.7</span> <span class="toctext">IRC</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#RSS.2C_Atom_readers"><span class="tocnumber">7.8</span> <span class="toctext">RSS, Atom readers</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Telnet.2C_SSH_clients"><span class="tocnumber">7.9</span> <span class="toctext">Telnet, SSH clients</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Bookmark_managers"><span class="tocnumber">7.10</span> <span class="toctext">Bookmark managers</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Search_engines"><span class="tocnumber">7.11</span> <span class="toctext">Search engines</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Podcast_managers"><span class="tocnumber">7.12</span> <span class="toctext">Podcast managers</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Proxy_server.2Fclients_and_Routing_Networks"><span class="tocnumber">7.13</span> <span class="toctext">Proxy server/clients and Routing Networks</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Wikis"><span class="tocnumber">7.14</span> <span class="toctext">Wikis</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Wiki-like_.28Note:_These_are_not_web-based.29"><span class="tocnumber">7.15</span> <span class="toctext">Wiki-like (Note: These are not web-based)</span></a></li></ul>
</li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Operating_Systems"><span class="tocnumber">8</span> <span class="toctext">Operating Systems</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Miscellaneous"><span class="tocnumber">9</span> <span class="toctext">Miscellaneous</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Multimedia"><span class="tocnumber">10</span> <span class="toctext">Multimedia</span></a>
<ul><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#File_converters"><span class="tocnumber">10.1</span> <span class="toctext">File converters</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#CD.2FDVD_burning"><span class="tocnumber">10.2</span> <span class="toctext">CD/DVD burning</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Editors_2"><span class="tocnumber">10.3</span> <span class="toctext">Editors</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Audio.2FMidi_Sequencer"><span class="tocnumber">10.4</span> <span class="toctext">Audio/Midi Sequencer</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Players"><span class="tocnumber">10.5</span> <span class="toctext">Players</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Recorders"><span class="tocnumber">10.6</span> <span class="toctext">Recorders</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Video_Capture"><span class="tocnumber">10.7</span> <span class="toctext">Video Capture</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Screen_Capture"><span class="tocnumber">10.8</span> <span class="toctext">Screen Capture</span></a></li></ul>
</li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Networking"><span class="tocnumber">11</span> <span class="toctext">Networking</span></a>
<ul><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#HTTP_servers"><span class="tocnumber">11.1</span> <span class="toctext">HTTP servers</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Miscellaneous_2"><span class="tocnumber">11.2</span> <span class="toctext">Miscellaneous</span></a></li></ul>
</li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Other_Tools"><span class="tocnumber">12</span> <span class="toctext">Other Tools</span></a>
<ul><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Web_Editors"><span class="tocnumber">12.1</span> <span class="toctext">Web Editors</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Calendar_management"><span class="tocnumber">12.2</span> <span class="toctext">Calendar management</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#File_management"><span class="tocnumber">12.3</span> <span class="toctext">File management</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#File_Archivers_and_Extractors"><span class="tocnumber">12.4</span> <span class="toctext">File Archivers and Extractors</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Screenwriting"><span class="tocnumber">12.5</span> <span class="toctext">Screenwriting</span></a></li></ul>
</li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#PDF_Tools"><span class="tocnumber">13</span> <span class="toctext">PDF Tools</span></a>
<ul><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Readers"><span class="tocnumber">13.1</span> <span class="toctext">Readers</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Writers"><span class="tocnumber">13.2</span> <span class="toctext">Writers</span></a></li></ul>
</li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Security_and_Encryption"><span class="tocnumber">14</span> <span class="toctext">Security and Encryption</span></a>
<ul><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Password_Management"><span class="tocnumber">14.1</span> <span class="toctext">Password Management</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Anti-Spyware.2FMalware"><span class="tocnumber">14.2</span> <span class="toctext">Anti-Spyware/Malware</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#AntiVirus"><span class="tocnumber">14.3</span> <span class="toctext">AntiVirus</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Real-Time_Disk.2FVolume_Encryption"><span class="tocnumber">14.4</span> <span class="toctext">Real-Time Disk/Volume Encryption</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#File_Encryption"><span class="tocnumber">14.5</span> <span class="toctext">File Encryption</span></a></li></ul>
</li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#System_Maintenance"><span class="tocnumber">15</span> <span class="toctext">System Maintenance</span></a>
<ul><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Storage_Management"><span class="tocnumber">15.1</span> <span class="toctext">Storage Management</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#System_Information"><span class="tocnumber">15.2</span> <span class="toctext">System Information</span></a></li><li class="toclevel-2"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#Partition.2FFile_Recovery"><span class="tocnumber">15.3</span> <span class="toctext">Partition/File Recovery</span></a></li></ul>
</li><li class="toclevel-1"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#References"><span class="tocnumber">16</span> <span class="toctext">References</span></a></li></ul>
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<p><a name="Application_launchers" id="Application_launchers"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=1" title="Edit section: Application launchers">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Application launchers</span></h2>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceedo" title="Ceedo">Ceedo</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Launchy" title="Launchy">Launchy</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MojoPac" title="MojoPac">MojoPac</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PortableApps.com" title="PortableApps.com">PortableApps.com</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=PStart&amp;action=edit&amp;redlink=1" class="new" title="PStart (page does not exist)">PStart</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Development" id="Development"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=2" title="Edit section: Development">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Development</span></h2>
<p><a name="IDEs" id="IDEs"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=3" title="Edit section: IDEs">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">IDEs</span></h3>
<ul><li>Portable <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dev-C%2B%2B" title="Dev-C++">Dev-C++</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JCreator" title="JCreator">JCreator</a> Not entirely portable, because it leaves some settings on the host computer.</li><li>Portable <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code::Blocks" title="Code::Blocks">Code::Blocks</a> (needs MinGW installed, which is portable too)</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hackety_Hack" title="Hackety Hack">Hackety Hack</a>, which is an educational version of ruby, can be installed on pendrive.</li></ul>
<p><a name="Scripting_Languages" id="Scripting_Languages"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=4" title="Edit section: Scripting Languages">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Scripting Languages</span></h3>
<ul><li>Portable <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSIS" class="mw-redirect" title="NSIS">NSIS</a> Version</li></ul>
<p><a name="Graphics" id="Graphics"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=5" title="Edit section: Graphics">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Graphics</span></h2>
<p><a name="3D_Modeling_And_Rendering"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=6" title="Edit section: 3D Modeling And Rendering">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">3D Modeling And Rendering</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anim8or" title="Anim8or">Anim8or</a>
<ul><li>Free 3D modeling and animating software.</li></ul>
</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blender_%28software%29" title="Blender (software)">Blender</a>:
<ul><li>BlenderPortable</li><li>Blender Pocket</li><li>XBlender</li></ul>
</li><li><a href="http://moi3d.com" class="external text" title="http://moi3d.com" rel="nofollow">MoI (Moment of Inspiration)</a>
<ul><li>Fantastic 3D Modeling (<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NURBS" class="mw-redirect" title="NURBS">NURBS</a>) for designers and artists - powerful, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAD" class="mw-redirect" title="CAD">CAD</a> accurate, yet easy to use!</li></ul>
</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wings3d" class="mw-redirect" title="Wings3d">Wings3d</a>
<ul><li>All versions are portable</li></ul>
</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SketchUp" title="SketchUp">SketchUp</a>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerkythea" title="Kerkythea">Kerkythea</a> Models made in SketchUp can be easily rendered in Kerkythea</li></ul>
</li></ul>
<p><a name="Graphic_Editors" id="Graphic_Editors"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=7" title="Edit section: Graphic Editors">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Graphic Editors</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ArtRage" title="ArtRage">ArtRage</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EVE_%28text_editor%29" title="EVE (text editor)">EVE</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GIMP" title="GIMP">GIMP</a>:
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=GIMPVS&amp;action=edit&amp;redlink=1" class="new" title="GIMPVS (page does not exist)">GIMPVS</a> GIMP Portable VS 2008 is the Gimp portable version of Gimp on <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Windows" title="Microsoft Windows">Microsoft Windows</a> platforms (Windows XP,Vista,NT Server 2003,NT Server 2008)</li><li><a href="http://portableapps.com/apps/graphics_pictures/gimp_portable" class="external text" title="http://portableapps.com/apps/graphics_pictures/gimp_portable" rel="nofollow">Portable Gimp</a> - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Windows" title="Microsoft Windows">Microsoft Windows</a></li><li>Portable Gimp - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X" title="Mac OS X">Mac OS X</a></li><li>X-Gimp</li><li>X-GimpShop</li></ul>
</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inkscape" title="Inkscape">Inkscape</a>:
<ul><li>X-Inkscape</li><li>Portable Inkscape - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X" title="Mac OS X">Mac OS X</a></li></ul>
</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pixia" title="Pixia">Pixia</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TuxPaint" class="mw-redirect" title="TuxPaint">XTuxPaint</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Processing" id="Processing"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=8" title="Edit section: Processing">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Processing</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cas" title="Cas">Cas</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RedEye" title="RedEye">RedEye</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UnFREEz" title="UnFREEz">UnFREEz</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Viewers" id="Viewers"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=9" title="Edit section: Viewers">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Viewers</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FastStone_Image_Viewer" title="FastStone Image Viewer">FastStone Image Viewer</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irfanview" class="mw-redirect" title="Irfanview">Irfanview</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XnView" title="XnView">XnView</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Document_Based" id="Document_Based"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=10" title="Edit section: Document Based">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Document Based</span></h2>
<p><a name="Office_and_Publishing" id="Office_and_Publishing"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=11" title="Edit section: Office and Publishing">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Office and Publishing</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abiword" class="mw-redirect" title="Abiword">Abiword</a>
<ul><li>Abiword Portable - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Windows" title="Microsoft Windows">Microsoft Windows</a></li><li>Portable Abiword - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X" title="Mac OS X">Mac OS X</a></li><li>X-Abiword</li></ul>
</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenOffice.org" title="OpenOffice.org">OpenOffice.org</a>
<ul><li>OpenOffice.org for U3</li><li>Portable OpenOffice - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Windows" title="Microsoft Windows">Microsoft Windows</a></li><li>Portable OpenOffice - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X" title="Mac OS X">Mac OS X</a></li><li>X-OpenOffice</li></ul>
</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qjot" title="Qjot">Qjot</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/StarOffice" title="StarOffice">Portable StarOffice</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RagTime_%28computer_program%29" title="RagTime (computer program)">RagTime</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scribus" title="Scribus">Scribus</a> Open source DTP, similar to PageMaker InDesign QuarkXPress (Win2K/XP)
<ul><li>X-Scribus</li><li>Portable Scribus</li></ul>
</li></ul>
<p><a name="Editors" id="Editors"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=12" title="Edit section: Editors">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Editors</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EmEditor" title="EmEditor">EmEditor Professional</a> - for portability, select <i>Import and Export</i> on <i>Tools</i> menu.</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GVim" class="mw-redirect" title="GVim">gVim</a> - for advanced users</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notepad%2B%2B" title="Notepad++">Notepad++</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notepad2" title="Notepad2">Notepad2</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NoteTab" title="NoteTab">NoteTab Light</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NotesHolder" title="NotesHolder">NotesHolder</a> - desktop notes, for portability install it in Portable mode.</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PSPad" title="PSPad">PSPad</a> - for portable use choose CAB archive</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SciTE" title="SciTE">SciTE</a> - for portability, set SciTE_HOME environment variable before launching</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TED_Notepad" title="TED Notepad">TED Notepad</a> - for portability, create a <i>tednpad.ini</i> file</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Textpad" class="mw-redirect" title="Textpad">Textpad</a> for text documents of every sort.</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UltraEdit" title="UltraEdit">UltraEdit</a> (UE3)</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VEDIT" title="VEDIT">VEDIT</a> - for portability, check "Install onto removable USB drive" checkbox on the first setup dialog.</li></ul>
<p><a name="Educational" id="Educational"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=13" title="Edit section: Educational">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Educational</span></h2>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DreamKana" title="DreamKana">DreamKana</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxima_%28software%29" title="Maxima (software)">Maxima</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stellarium" title="Stellarium">Stellarium</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gcompris" class="mw-redirect" title="Gcompris">Gcompris</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Games" id="Games"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=14" title="Edit section: Games">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Games</span></h2>
<p>See <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_computer_games" title="List of portable computer games">List of portable computer games</a></p>
<p><a name="Internet" id="Internet"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=15" title="Edit section: Internet">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Internet</span></h2>
<p><a name="Web_browsers" id="Web_browsers"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=16" title="Edit section: Web browsers">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_browser" title="Web browser">Web browsers</a></span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avant_Browser" title="Avant Browser">Avant</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firefox_Portable" class="mw-redirect" title="Firefox Portable">Firefox Portable</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxthon_Browser" class="mw-redirect" title="Maxthon Browser">Maxthon Browser</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opera_Browser" class="mw-redirect" title="Opera Browser">Opera Browser</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XeroBank_Browser" title="XeroBank Browser">XeroBank Browser</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Browzer_Browser&amp;action=edit&amp;redlink=1" class="new" title="Browzer Browser (page does not exist)">Browzer Browser</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Email_clients" id="Email_clients"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=17" title="Edit section: Email clients">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Email_client" class="mw-redirect" title="Email client">Email clients</a></span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mozilla_Thunderbird#Portable_releases" title="Mozilla Thunderbird">Mozilla Thunderbird Portable</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pegasus_Mail" title="Pegasus Mail">Pegasus Mail</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pine_%28e-mail_client%29" title="Pine (e-mail client)">Pine</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bat%21" title="The Bat!">The Bat! Voyager</a></li><li>Portable <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_mail" class="mw-redirect" title="Apple mail">Mail</a> - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X" title="Mac OS X">Mac OS X</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Instant_messaging" id="Instant_messaging"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=18" title="Edit section: Instant messaging">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instant_messaging" title="Instant messaging">Instant messaging</a></span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adium" title="Adium">Adium</a> - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X" title="Mac OS X">Mac OS X</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coccinella_%28software%29" title="Coccinella (software)">Coccinella</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Talk" title="Google Talk">Google Talk</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miniaim" title="Miniaim">Miniaim</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miranda_IM" title="Miranda IM">Miranda IM</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pidgin_%28instant_messaging_client%29" class="mw-redirect" title="Pidgin (instant messaging client)">Pidgin Portable</a> (formerly Gaim Portable)</li><li>Portable <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skype" title="Skype">Skype</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psi_%28instant_messenger%29" class="mw-redirect" title="Psi (instant messenger)">Portable PSI</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quiet_Internet_Pager" title="Quiet Internet Pager">QIP</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TerraIM" title="TerraIM">TerraIM</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trillian_%28instant_messaging_client%29" class="mw-redirect" title="Trillian (instant messaging client)">Trillian Anywhere</a></li><li>Portable <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IChat" title="IChat">iChat</a> - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X" title="Mac OS X">Mac OS X</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="FTP_clients" id="FTP_clients"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=19" title="Edit section: FTP clients">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FTP_client" class="mw-redirect" title="FTP client">FTP clients</a></span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WinSCP" title="WinSCP">WinSCP</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FileZilla" title="FileZilla">FileZilla</a></li><li>Portable <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyberduck" title="Cyberduck">Cyberduck</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SmartFTP" title="SmartFTP">SmartFTP</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FlashFXP" title="FlashFXP">FlashFXP</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Download_managers" id="Download_managers"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=20" title="Edit section: Download managers">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Download_manager" title="Download manager">Download managers</a></span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wget" title="Wget">Wget</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTrack" title="HTTrack">HTTrack</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WxDownload_Fast" title="WxDownload Fast">WxDownload Fast</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_Download_Manager" title="Free Download Manager">Free Download Manager</a> - <i>Note: installation required to create portable version.</i></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DownThemAll%21" title="DownThemAll!">DownThemAll!</a> - <i>Note: Extension of <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portable_Firefox" class="mw-redirect" title="Portable Firefox">Portable Firefox</a></i></li></ul>
<p><a name="P2P_file_sharing" id="P2P_file_sharing"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=21" title="Edit section: P2P file sharing">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peer-to-peer" title="Peer-to-peer">P2P</a> <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File_sharing" title="File sharing">file sharing</a></span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitComet" title="BitComet">BitComet</a> - <i>Note: needs msxml.</i></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTornado" title="BitTornado">BitTornado</a> - <i>Note: needs msxml.</i></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emule" class="mw-redirect" title="Emule">Emule</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%CE%9CTorrent" title="ΜTorrent">μTorrent</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limewire" class="mw-redirect" title="Limewire">Limewire</a> - <i>Note: needs Java runtime environment.</i></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frostwire" class="mw-redirect" title="Frostwire">Frostwire</a> - <i>Note: needs Java runtime environment.</i></li></ul>
<p><a name="IRC" id="IRC"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=22" title="Edit section: IRC">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IRC" class="mw-redirect" title="IRC">IRC</a></span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chatzilla" class="mw-redirect" title="Chatzilla">Chatzilla</a> <i>Note: Requires a Mozilla based browser, e.g. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SeaMonkey" title="SeaMonkey">SeaMonkey</a>, or <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firefox" class="mw-redirect" title="Firefox">Firefox</a>.</i></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HydraIRC" title="HydraIRC">HydraIRC</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miranda_IM" title="Miranda IM">Miranda IM</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIRC" title="MIRC">mIRC</a> <i>Note: requires command line switch -portable.</i></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nettalk_%28Windows_chat_software%29" title="Nettalk (Windows chat software)">Nettalk</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pidgin_%28software%29" title="Pidgin (software)">Pidgin</a> (formerly Gaim)</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xchat" class="mw-redirect" title="Xchat">Xchat</a></li><li>Portable <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-Chat_Aqua" class="mw-redirect" title="X-Chat Aqua">X-Chat Aqua</a> - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X" title="Mac OS X">Mac OS X</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kvirc" class="mw-redirect" title="Kvirc">kvirc</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="RSS.2C_Atom_readers" id="RSS.2C_Atom_readers"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=23" title="Edit section: RSS, Atom readers">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RSS_%28file_format%29" class="mw-redirect" title="RSS (file format)">RSS</a>, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atom_%28standard%29" title="Atom (standard)">Atom</a> readers</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RSSOwl" title="RSSOwl">RSSOwl</a> <i>Note: needs Java runtime environment.</i></li><li>Portable <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vienna_%28feed_reader%29" title="Vienna (feed reader)">Vienna</a> - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X" title="Mac OS X">Mac OS X</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Telnet.2C_SSH_clients" id="Telnet.2C_SSH_clients"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=24" title="Edit section: Telnet, SSH clients">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telnet" class="mw-redirect" title="Telnet">Telnet</a>, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secure_Shell" title="Secure Shell">SSH</a> clients</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PortaPuTTY" class="mw-redirect" title="PortaPuTTY">portaPuTTY</a></li><li>WinSCP Portable Edition - <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SSH_file_transfer_protocol" title="SSH file transfer protocol">SFTP</a>/<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secure_copy" title="Secure copy">SCP</a>/<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FTP" class="mw-redirect" title="FTP">FTP</a> client, remote file manager, GUI -- see <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WinSCP" title="WinSCP">WinSCP</a>.</li></ul>
<p><a name="Bookmark_managers" id="Bookmark_managers"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=25" title="Edit section: Bookmark managers">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bookmark_manager" class="mw-redirect" title="Bookmark manager">Bookmark managers</a></span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portable_Bookmarks" title="Portable Bookmarks">Portable Bookmarks</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Del.icio.us" title="Del.icio.us">Del.icio.us</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Search_engines" id="Search_engines"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=26" title="Edit section: Search engines">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_engine" class="mw-redirect" title="Search engine">Search engines</a></span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filehawk" title="Filehawk">Filehawk</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaviri_PocketSearch" title="Gaviri PocketSearch">Gaviri PocketSearch</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Podcast_managers" id="Podcast_managers"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=27" title="Edit section: Podcast managers">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Podcast" title="Podcast">Podcast</a> managers</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juice_%28software%29" title="Juice (software)">Juice</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Proxy_server.2Fclients_and_Routing_Networks" id="Proxy_server.2Fclients_and_Routing_Networks"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=28" title="Edit section: Proxy server/clients and Routing Networks">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proxy_server" title="Proxy server">Proxy server</a>/clients and <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Routing" title="Routing">Routing</a> Networks</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portable_Tor" title="Portable Tor">Portable Tor</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Wikis" id="Wikis"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=29" title="Edit section: Wikis">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki" title="Wiki">Wikis</a></span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PmWiki" title="PmWiki">PmWiki</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TiddlyWiki" title="TiddlyWiki">TiddlyWiki</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MoinMoin" title="MoinMoin">Moin Moin Desktop Edition</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Wiki-like_.28Note:_These_are_not_web-based.29" id="Wiki-like_.28Note:_These_are_not_web-based.29"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=30" title="Edit section: Wiki-like (Note: These are not web-based)">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki" title="Wiki">Wiki</a>-like (Note: These are not web-based)</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EverNote" title="EverNote">EverNote</a> (freeware &amp; commercial versions)</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/StoneNotes" title="StoneNotes">StoneNotes</a> (commercial/proprietary)</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikidpad" class="mw-redirect" title="Wikidpad">Wikidpad</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Operating_Systems" id="Operating_Systems"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=31" title="Edit section: Operating Systems">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Operating Systems</span></h2>
<p><i>See <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_LiveDistros" title="List of LiveDistros">List of LiveDistros</a> and <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Live_USB" title="Live USB">Live USB</a></i></p>
<p><a name="Miscellaneous" id="Miscellaneous"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=32" title="Edit section: Miscellaneous">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Miscellaneous</span></h2>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Webfoglio&amp;action=edit&amp;redlink=1" class="new" title="Webfoglio (page does not exist)">Webfoglio</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moka5" title="Moka5">Moka5</a> LivePC Engine (Portable VMWare). Note: Dynamically loads and unloads network drivers and requires administrator rights.</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mojopac" class="mw-redirect" title="Mojopac">Mojopac</a> portable choped down copy of windows. Requires administrator rights.</li></ul>
<p><a name="Multimedia" id="Multimedia"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=33" title="Edit section: Multimedia">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Multimedia</span></h2>
<p><a name="File_converters" id="File_converters"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=34" title="Edit section: File converters">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">File converters</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audiograbber" title="Audiograbber">Audiograbber</a> is a CD audio extractor (digitally).</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BonkEnc" title="BonkEnc">BonkEnc</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CDex" title="CDex">CDex</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MediaCoder" title="MediaCoder">MediaCoder</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SUPER_%28software%29" title="SUPER (software)">SUPER</a>
- (Simplified Universal Player Encoder &amp; Renderer) is a program
that easily encapsulates the capabilities of ffmpeg, MEncoder, mplayer,
x264, mppenc, ffmpeg2theora, and the theora/vorbis RealProducer plugIn.
Has problems with portability.</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TMPGEnc" title="TMPGEnc">TMPGEnc</a>
- a video encoder that supports HDV import/output along with DivX 6
AVI, MPEG-1/2/4, QuickTime (MOV), and Window Media (WMV/WMV-HD/WMA)
input/output.</li></ul>
<p><a name="CD.2FDVD_burning" id="CD.2FDVD_burning"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=35" title="Edit section: CD/DVD burning">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CD/DVD_burning" class="mw-redirect" title="CD/DVD burning">CD/DVD burning</a></span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DeepBurner_Portable_Edition" class="mw-redirect" title="DeepBurner Portable Edition">DeepBurner Portable Edition</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/InfraRecorder" title="InfraRecorder">InfraRecorder</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Editors_2" id="Editors_2"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=36" title="Edit section: Editors">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Editors</span></h3>
<ul><li>Portable <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audacity" title="Audacity">Audacity</a> - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows" class="mw-redirect" title="Windows">Windows</a> and <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X" title="Mac OS X">Mac OS X</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audiobook_Cutter_Free_Edition" title="Audiobook Cutter Free Edition">Audiobook Cutter Free Edition</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mp3DirectCut" title="Mp3DirectCut">mp3DirectCut</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Audio.2FMidi_Sequencer" id="Audio.2FMidi_Sequencer"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=37" title="Edit section: Audio/Midi Sequencer">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Audio/Midi Sequencer</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/REAPER" title="REAPER">Reaper</a> has a .bat file for a USB stick installation</li></ul>
<p><a name="Players" id="Players"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=38" title="Edit section: Players">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Players</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FLV_player" title="FLV player">FLV player</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1by1" title="1by1">1by1</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy" title="Billy">Billy</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BSplayer" class="mw-redirect" title="BSplayer">Portable BSplayer</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CD" class="mw-redirect" title="CD">CD</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foobar2000" title="Foobar2000">foobar2000</a> - not for Windows 98</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HACP" title="HACP">HACP</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MPlayer" title="MPlayer">MPlayer</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_KMPlayer" title="The KMPlayer">The KMPlayer</a> - A useful portable player (use zip version to make it portable)</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Core_Pocket_Media_Player" title="The Core Pocket Media Player">The Core Pocket Media Player</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VideoLAN" title="VideoLAN">VideoLAN</a>:
<ul><li>VLC Media Player Portable</li><li>Portable VLC for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X" title="Mac OS X">Mac OS X</a></li><li>XVideoLAN</li></ul>
</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XMPlay" title="XMPlay">XMPlay</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winamp" title="Winamp">Winamp</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Recorders" id="Recorders"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=39" title="Edit section: Recorders">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Recorders</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streamripper" title="Streamripper">Streamripper</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/StationRipper" title="StationRipper">StationRipper</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Video_Capture" id="Video_Capture"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=40" title="Edit section: Video Capture">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Video Capture</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VirtualDub" title="VirtualDub">VirtualDub</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Screen_Capture" id="Screen_Capture"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=41" title="Edit section: Screen Capture">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Screen Capture</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snippy" title="Snippy">Snippy</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Networking" id="Networking"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=42" title="Edit section: Networking">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Networking</span></h2>
<p><a name="HTTP_servers" id="HTTP_servers"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=43" title="Edit section: HTTP servers">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP_server" class="mw-redirect" title="HTTP server">HTTP servers</a></span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruby_on_Rails" title="Ruby on Rails">Rails</a>, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apache_web_server" class="mw-redirect" title="Apache web server">Apache</a>, and <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MySQL" title="MySQL">MySQL</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Server2Go" title="Server2Go">Server2Go</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XAMPP" title="XAMPP">XAMPP</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WOS" title="WOS">WOS</a></li><li>The <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniform_Server" title="Uniform Server">Uniform Server</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP_File_Server" title="HTTP File Server">HTTP File Server</a> (HFS)</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EasyPHP" title="EasyPHP">easyPHP</a></li><li>Small HTTP server</li></ul>
<p><a name="Miscellaneous_2" id="Miscellaneous_2"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=44" title="Edit section: Miscellaneous">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Miscellaneous</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://internet.junkbuster.com/" class="external text" title="http://internet.junkbuster.com/" rel="nofollow">Internet Junk Buster</a> - Personal proxy server (No longer maintained as of 1998)</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netcat" title="Netcat">Netcat</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proxomitron" title="Proxomitron">Proxomitron</a> - Filtering Web Proxy</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xming" title="Xming">Xming</a></li><li>WinDump: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tcpdump" title="Tcpdump">Tcpdump</a> for Windows</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireshark" title="Wireshark">Wireshark</a></li><li>VNC: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RealVNC" title="RealVNC">RealVNC</a> Viewer for Windows</li></ul>
<p><a name="Other_Tools" id="Other_Tools"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=45" title="Edit section: Other Tools">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Other Tools</span></h2>
<p><a name="Web_Editors" id="Web_Editors"></a></p>
<h4><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=46" title="Edit section: Web Editors">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Web Editors</span></h4>
<ul><li>Portable <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nvu" title="Nvu">Nvu</a> - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X" title="Mac OS X">Mac OS X</a></li><li>OpenOffice.org Portable - Complete office suite, which includes HTML editor.</li></ul>
<p><a name="Calendar_management" id="Calendar_management"></a></p>
<h4><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=47" title="Edit section: Calendar management">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Calendar management</span></h4>
<ul><li>Portable <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mozilla_sunbird" class="mw-redirect" title="Mozilla sunbird">Sunbird</a> - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X" title="Mac OS X">Mac OS X</a></li><li>Portable <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICal" title="ICal">iCal</a> - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X" title="Mac OS X">Mac OS X</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="File_management" id="File_management"></a></p>
<h4><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=48" title="Edit section: File management">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">File management</span></h4>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A43_%28software%29" title="A43 (software)">A43</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Directory_Opus" title="Directory Opus">Directory Opus</a> by selecting the USB/U3 export option</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Servant_Salamander" class="mw-redirect" title="Servant Salamander">Servant Salamander</a> 1.52</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Total_Commander" title="Total Commander">Total Commander</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duplicate_Files_Searcher" title="Duplicate Files Searcher">Duplicate Files Searcher</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="File_Archivers_and_Extractors" id="File_Archivers_and_Extractors"></a></p>
<h4><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=49" title="Edit section: File Archivers and Extractors">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">File Archivers and Extractors</span></h4>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7-Zip" title="7-Zip">7-Zip</a> Portable</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filzip" title="Filzip">Filzip</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peazip" class="mw-redirect" title="Peazip">PeaZip</a>, for Linux and Windows</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IZArc" title="IZArc">iZarc2go</a>, Portable version of iZarc</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WinRAR" title="WinRAR">WinRAR</a>,
Portable version for Windows, still requires having a license for a
regular version of WinRAR. The version number for WinRAR Unplugged is
3.7.1.1, while the latest WinRAR for Windows version is 3.71. WinRAR
Unplugged is available from <a href="http://www.win-rar.com/" class="external free" title="http://www.win-rar.com/" rel="nofollow">http://www.win-rar.com/</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Screenwriting" id="Screenwriting"></a></p>
<h4><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=50" title="Edit section: Screenwriting">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Screenwriting</span></h4>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtx" title="Celtx">Celtx</a> Portable</li></ul>
<p><a name="PDF_Tools" id="PDF_Tools"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=51" title="Edit section: PDF Tools">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">PDF Tools</span></h2>
<p><a name="Readers" id="Readers"></a></p>
<h4><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=52" title="Edit section: Readers">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Readers</span></h4>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foxit_Reader" title="Foxit Reader">Foxit Reader</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sumatra_PDF" title="Sumatra PDF">Sumatra PDF</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Writers" id="Writers"></a></p>
<h4><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=53" title="Edit section: Writers">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Writers</span></h4>
<ul><li>Portable OpenOffice - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Windows" title="Microsoft Windows">Microsoft Windows</a></li><li>Portable OpenOffice - for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X" title="Mac OS X">Mac OS X</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Security_and_Encryption" id="Security_and_Encryption"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=54" title="Edit section: Security and Encryption">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Security and Encryption</span></h2>
<p><a name="Password_Management" id="Password_Management"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=55" title="Edit section: Password Management">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Password Management</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KeePass" title="KeePass">KeePass</a> Portable</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Password_Safe" title="Password Safe">Password Safe</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roboform" title="Roboform">Roboform</a> RoboForm2Go</li></ul>
<p><a name="Anti-Spyware.2FMalware" id="Anti-Spyware.2FMalware"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=56" title="Edit section: Anti-Spyware/Malware">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Anti-Spyware/Malware</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ad-aware" class="mw-redirect" title="Ad-aware">Ad-aware</a> (only the SE Personal edition, which is no longer supported - Ad Aware 2007 is not portable)</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CWShredder" title="CWShredder">CWShredder</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HijackThis" title="HijackThis">HijackThis</a> Powerful tool for listing all startup programs and other hidden system modifications.</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spybot_-_Search_%26_Destroy" title="Spybot - Search &amp; Destroy">Spybot - Search &amp; Destroy</a> Note - Requires power user or administrator privileges for Windows XP</li></ul>
<p><a name="AntiVirus" id="AntiVirus"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=57" title="Edit section: AntiVirus">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">AntiVirus</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ClamWin" title="ClamWin">ClamWin Portable</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rootkit_Revealer" class="mw-redirect" title="Rootkit Revealer">Rootkit Revealer</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="Real-Time_Disk.2FVolume_Encryption" id="Real-Time_Disk.2FVolume_Encryption"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=58" title="Edit section: Real-Time Disk/Volume Encryption">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Real-Time Disk/Volume Encryption</span></h3>
<p><i>Note: All of the software in this section requires administrator privileges to start their respective drivers.</i></p>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FreeOTFE" title="FreeOTFE">FreeOTFE</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TrueCrypt" title="TrueCrypt">TrueCrypt</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="File_Encryption" id="File_Encryption"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=59" title="Edit section: File Encryption">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">File Encryption</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carry_it_Easy_%2BPlus" title="Carry it Easy +Plus">Carry it Easy +Plus</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="System_Maintenance" id="System_Maintenance"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=60" title="Edit section: System Maintenance">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">System Maintenance</span></h2>
<p><a name="Storage_Management" id="Storage_Management"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=61" title="Edit section: Storage Management">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Storage Management</span></h3>
<p>Visual maps of free space and biggest files and folders on hard drive.</p>
<ul><li>Scanner</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SpaceMonger" title="SpaceMonger">SpaceMonger</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="System_Information" id="System_Information"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=62" title="Edit section: System Information">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">System Information</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CPU-Z" title="CPU-Z">CPU-Z</a> - CPU and memory hardware details - clock and FSB speeds, SPD, OS version.</li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AIDA32" title="AIDA32">AIDA32</a> - freeware system information, diagnostics, and auditing program written by Tamas Miklos, Win 95-XP.</li></ul>
<p><a name="Partition.2FFile_Recovery" id="Partition.2FFile_Recovery"></a></p>
<h3><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=63" title="Edit section: Partition/File Recovery">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">Partition/File Recovery</span></h3>
<ul><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photorec" class="mw-redirect" title="Photorec">Photorec</a></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Testdisk" class="mw-redirect" title="Testdisk">Testdisk</a></li></ul>
<p><a name="References" id="References"></a></p>
<h2><span class="editsection">[<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_portable_software&amp;action=edit&amp;section=64" title="Edit section: References">edit</a>]</span> <span class="mw-headline">References</span></h2>

<ol class="references"><li id="_note-0"><b><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_portable_software#_ref-0" title="">^</a></b> John Guilfoil (<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006" title="2006">2006</a>-<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_7" title="September 7">09-07</a>). <a href="http://blogcritics.org/archives/2006/09/07/133422.php" class="external text" title="http://blogcritics.org/archives/2006/09/07/133422.php" rel="nofollow">Fun with Portable Software</a>. Retrieved on <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008" title="2008">2008</a>-<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/January_24" title="January 24">01-24</a>.</li></ol></html>
<html><div style="width: 425px; text-align: left;" id="__ss_134281"><object style="margin: 0px;" height="355" width="425"><param name="movie" value="http://static.slideshare.net/swf/ssplayer2.swf?doc=portable-open-source-applications-on-a-usb-flash-drive1521"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://static.slideshare.net/swf/ssplayer2.swf?doc=portable-open-source-applications-on-a-usb-flash-drive1521" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" height="355" width="425"></object><div style="font-size: 11px; font-family: tahoma,arial; height: 26px; padding-top: 2px;"><a href="http://www.slideshare.net/?src=embed"><img src="http://static.slideshare.net/swf/logo_embd.png" style="border: 0px none ; margin-bottom: -5px;" alt="SlideShare"></a> | <a href="http://www.slideshare.net/scyuen/portable-open-source-applications-on-a-usb-flash-drive?src=embed" title="View 'Portable, Open Source Applications on a USB Flash Drive' on SlideShare">View</a> | <a href="http://www.slideshare.net/upload?src=embed">Upload your own</a></div></div></html>


<html><div style="width: 425px; text-align: left;" id="__ss_86670"><object style="margin: 0px;" height="355" width="425"><param name="movie" value="http://static.slideshare.net/swf/ssplayer2.swf?doc=ratbag-radio-network1645"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://static.slideshare.net/swf/ssplayer2.swf?doc=ratbag-radio-network1645" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" height="355" width="425"></object><div style="font-size: 11px; font-family: tahoma,arial; height: 26px; padding-top: 2px;"><a href="http://www.slideshare.net/?src=embed"><img src="http://static.slideshare.net/swf/logo_embd.png" style="border: 0px none ; margin-bottom: -5px;" alt="SlideShare"></a> | <a href="http://www.slideshare.net/ratbagradio/ratbag-radio-network?src=embed" title="View 'Ratbag Radio Network' on SlideShare">View</a> | <a href="http://www.slideshare.net/upload?src=embed">Upload your own</a></div></div></html>
<html><div align="justify"><blockquote><a onblur="try {parent.deselectBloggerImageGracefully();} catch(e) {}" href="http://bp1.blogger.com/_nlVqFD-yqU4/R9h2DKwft5I/AAAAAAAABNs/UCNvK5RDsY0/s1600-h/Blather+cartoon.jpg"><img style="margin: 0pt 10px 10px 0pt; float: left; cursor: pointer; width: 96px; height: 138px;" src="http://bp1.blogger.com/_nlVqFD-yqU4/R9h2DKwft5I/AAAAAAAABNs/UCNvK5RDsY0/s200/Blather+cartoon.jpg" alt="" id="BLOGGER_PHOTO_ID_5177017568461830034" border="0" /></a> <i><b> RatbagMedia Tiddly</b> is an exercise in note taking and archiving from all over using TiddlyWiki. 'Tis </i><i>an amazing platform but it takes some getting used to and mastering. But hey! I recommend the effort to you. Its' my own customized database.What a way to log your this and that and keep it all in the one place I love to spend my time at/out there in Web 2.

</i><br><blockquote><i>Dave Riley</i></blockquote></div>

<big><span style="font-weight: bold;"><br><br><br>ELSEWHERE</span></big><small>
</small></b><div class="WikiCustomNav WikiElement wiki"><ul><li><h2><small><a class="wiki_link" href="https://ratbagmedia.wikispaces.com/">RatbagMedia Wiki</a></small></h2></li></ul><b><b>CHANNELS</b>
 </b><ul><li><b><strong><a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/RatbagRadioBlog"><img src="http://www.feedburner.com/fb/images/pub/feed-icon32x32.png" alt="external image feed-icon32x32.png" title="external image feed-icon32x32.png" style="height: 10px; width: 10px;"></a><a class="wiki_link_ext" href="http://ratbagradio.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow"> The Blather</a></strong></b></li><li><b><b><strong></strong><a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/Leftcast"><img src="http://www.feedburner.com/fb/images/pub/feed-icon32x32.png" alt="external image feed-icon32x32.png" title="external image feed-icon32x32.png" style="height: 10px; width: 10px;"></a><a class="wiki_link_ext" href="http://leftcast.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow"> LeftCast</a></b></b></li><li><b><strong><a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/VenezuelaSolidarity"><img src="http://www.feedburner.com/fb/images/pub/feed-icon32x32.png" alt="external image feed-icon32x32.png" title="external image feed-icon32x32.png" style="height: 10px; width: 10px;"></a><a class="wiki_link_ext" href="http://vensol.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow"> LatinRadical</a></strong></b></li><li><b><strong></strong><a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/Leftclick"><img src="http://www.feedburner.com/fb/images/pub/feed-icon32x32.png" alt="external image feed-icon32x32.png" title="external image feed-icon32x32.png" style="height: 11px; width: 10px;"></a><strong><a class="wiki_link_ext" href="http://leftclickblog.blogspot.com/" rel="nofollow"> LeftClick (blog)</a></strong>
</b></li></ul><b><strong>RESOURCES</strong>
 </b><ul><li><b><b><a class="wiki_link" href="http://altmedianetwork.wikispaces.com/">AltMediaNetwork</a></b></b></li><li><b><b><span class="wiki_link_new"><a class="wiki_link" href="http://activist-toolkit.wikispaces.com/">Activist Toolkit</a></span></b></b></li></ul></div>
<b>

</b><br><div align="center"><a href="http://vensol.blogspot.com/"><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://ratbagmedia.wikispaces.com/space/showimage/LatinRadical.jpg" height="80" width="572" /></a>
<a href="http://leftcast.blogspot.com/"><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://ratbagmedia.wikispaces.com/space/showimage/LeftCast.jpg" height="80" width="572" /></a>
<a href="http://ratbagradio.blogspot.com/"><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://ratbagmedia.wikispaces.com/space/showimage/blather_logo.jpg" height="123" width="572" /></a>
<a href="http://kickbike.blogspot.com/"><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://ratbagradio.wikispaces.com/space/showimage/kickbiking_banner08.jpg" height="80" width="572" /></a>
<a href="http://kickbike.blogspot.com/"><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://ratbagradio.wikispaces.com/space/showimage/lefclickshot.jpg" height="80" width="572" /></a></div></html>
/***
| Name:|RenameTagsPlugin|
| Description:|Allows you to easily rename or delete tags across multiple tiddlers|
| Version:|3.0 ($Rev: 1845 $)|
| Date:|$Date: 2007-03-16 15:19:22 +1000 (Fri, 16 Mar 2007) $|
| Source:|http://mptw.tiddlyspot.com/#RenameTagsPlugin|
| Author:|Simon Baird <simon.baird@gmail.com>|
| License|http://mptw.tiddlyspot.com/#TheBSDLicense|
Rename a tag and you will be prompted to rename it in all its tagged tiddlers.
***/
//{{{
config.renameTags = {

	prompts: {
		rename: "Rename the tag '%0' to '%1' in %2 tidder%3?",
		remove: "Remove the tag '%0' from %1 tidder%2?"
	},

	removeTag: function(tag,tiddlers) {
		store.suspendNotifications();
		for (var i=0;i<tiddlers.length;i++) {
			store.setTiddlerTag(tiddlers[i].title,false,tag);
		}
		store.resumeNotifications();
		store.notifyAll();
	},

	renameTag: function(oldTag,newTag,tiddlers) {
		store.suspendNotifications();
		for (var i=0;i<tiddlers.length;i++) {
			store.setTiddlerTag(tiddlers[i].title,false,oldTag); // remove old
			store.setTiddlerTag(tiddlers[i].title,true,newTag);  // add new
		}
		store.resumeNotifications();
		store.notifyAll();
	},

	storeMethods: {

		saveTiddler_orig_renameTags: TiddlyWiki.prototype.saveTiddler,

		saveTiddler: function(title,newTitle,newBody,modifier,modified,tags,fields) {
			if (title != newTitle) {
				var tagged = this.getTaggedTiddlers(title);
				if (tagged.length > 0) {
					// then we are renaming a tag
					if (confirm(config.renameTags.prompts.rename.format([title,newTitle,tagged.length,tagged.length>1?"s":""])))
						config.renameTags.renameTag(title,newTitle,tagged);

					if (!this.tiddlerExists(title) && newBody == "")
						// dont create unwanted tiddler
						return null;
				}
			}
			return this.saveTiddler_orig_renameTags(title,newTitle,newBody,modifier,modified,tags,fields);
		},

		removeTiddler_orig_renameTags: TiddlyWiki.prototype.removeTiddler,

		removeTiddler: function(title) {
			var tagged = this.getTaggedTiddlers(title);
			if (tagged.length > 0)
				if (confirm(config.renameTags.prompts.remove.format([title,tagged.length,tagged.length>1?"s":""])))
					config.renameTags.removeTag(title,tagged);
			return this.removeTiddler_orig_renameTags(title);
		}

	},

	init: function() {
		merge(TiddlyWiki.prototype,this.storeMethods);
	}
}

config.renameTags.init();

//}}}

Rug pulled from ABC Learning

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Related Coverage

    * Elizabeth Knight: King gets lesson in margin lending
    * Malcolm Maiden: Either ABC's kidding us or some punters have made a killing
    * XChange: ABC's landlord takes a beating
    * MICHAEL WEST: Who's next for financial judgment day?
    * Eddy faces annihilation as ABC board caught by margin calls

Advertisement

    * Vanda Carson
    * February 27, 2008
    *

SHARES in the child-care provider ABC Learning Centres yesterday plunged almost 70 per cent at one point after concerns arose about its ability to meet debt covenants.

Investors sold on fears that if the downturn in the US economy were to see revenues fall at ABC's 1000 US centres, then the declining value of centres could trigger a breach of the company's covenants on $1.2 billion worth of loans used to fund their purchase. It has total debt of $1.8 billion.

Margin calls on directors' shareholdings, understood to include chief executive Eddy Groves and his wife, Le Neve, put further pressure on the stock yesterday.

The shares closed at their lowest point in five years, down 43 per cent at $2.14, after recovering from lows of $1.15 in morning trading.

The spectre of declining occupancy in US centres is hanging over the stock as warnings sound that the American economy is faltering and unemployment is about to rise.

If the company were to write down the value of its US child-care licences by just $223 million, it would trigger a breach and possibly lead to forced asset sales.

Mr Groves yesterday reassured shareholders that the company had not yet breached the covenants because shareholder funds exceeded $2 billion.

According to its balance sheet, released to the market on Monday, the company has shareholder funds of $2.23 billion.

Shareholder funds is the value of assets minus liabilities, and two-thirds of its assets are listed as intangible, including its US child-care licences.

The company, which has been in a massive expansion phase in the past two years, has a negative balance of hard physical assets to intangible assets to the tune of $1.75 per share.

The company also has $1.2 billion of debt repayable in three years, and $600 million of convertible notes on a nine-year term.

It is unclear how much time the banks would give the company to repay the loans if its shareholder funds were to fall below $2 billion. At June 30 last year shareholder funds were at $1.9 billion.

Investors have been cautious about ABC's expansion in the US, where it expects most of its future growth, with shares losing nearly half their value since hitting $7.57 last May when the Singaporean fund Temasek bought a stake.

Shares peaked in December 2006 at $8.63, valuing the company at $4.1 billion.

Clime Asset Management fund manager Roger Montgomery yesterday told Bloomberg that ABC Learning was not an economically viable business in its current form.

"ABC generates a lower rate of return on the owner's equity than a term deposit. ABC was once a very profitable small business. It's now a less-than-mediocre large business," he said.

Mr Groves yesterday assured the Herald that the US licences would retain their value, even in an economic downturn, saying they were valued on a discounted cash flow method over a five-year period.

"If there was a small dip [in US earnings] you still base it over a five-year cash flow," he said.

"We haven't seen any downturn due to the recession [in the US]," he said.

He believed yesterday's fall in the share price was less to do with concerns over the ability to stay within loan guidelines and more to do with the market reaction to a 40 per cent fall in first-half profit, revealed after the market closed on Monday.

The company also plans to sell $250 million of property assets by June this year - which in itself would put its shareholder funds below the $2 billion trigger point - so it would be o

Source: [[Rug pulled from ABC Learning : smh.com.au|http://business.smh.com.au/rug-pulled-from-abc-learning/20080226-1v0n.html]]
Over the years the proportion of people in New South Wales using public transport has fallen steadily, from over 40% in 1945 to under 10% today.
Now, the public transport system only really gets used to capacity at peak hour. The rest of the time it’s used by those who can’t afford car travel.
Little wonder that the NSW government has been closing rail lines and neglecting the system to the point that train travel across the state has been getting slower over the past decade! (Over the same period spending on motorways
reached $10 billion.)
In 2006-07, according to the Ministry of Transport, the average subsidy per passenger trip will be $4.21 on CityRail, 70 cents on Sydney and Newcastle buses, $2.34 on Sydney ferries and $58.28 on CountryLink— the entire system will absorb $3.4 billion in grants and
subsidies.
Here’s why the transport authorities and the NSW government wants to keep cutting “loss-making” services like the Broadmeadow-Newcastle link, arguing that some of this money would be better spent upgrading the system where there is still demand (especially in the Sydney region).
But this way of looking at the issue is dead wrong. The only way to measure the global cost and benefit of public transport is against the global cost and benefit of the alternative—shifting people and goods by car and truck.
On that scale public transport wins hands down—every 10% switch out of car and truck and into public transport will reduce the costs of air pollution, greenhouse gas emission, car accidents, traffic congestion, motor vehicle waste disposal, noise pollution and road maintenance by an order of $1.4 billion at least.
That’s why the Socialist Alliance calls for a three-month trial of free public transport (see www.socialist- alliance.org)  to test out in practice the gains that could be made for our health and the environment by a radical switch back to public transport.
At the same time the Alliance proposes an all-round upgrading of the public transport system. 
1. Extend and improve the network
After years of neglect the Iemma government has finally embraced a plan for increased rail infrastructure in the
Sydney region—the Metropolitan Rail Expansion Plan (MREP). But NSW’s rail infrastructure is already 20 years
behind where it should be and a rapid switch to public transport is needed if there is to be a serious impact on
climate change and air pollution.
This requires:
• Implementing the MREP not by 2015 but as soon as possible. This is urgently needed to unclog
freight and suburban and interurban rail networks, allowing more trains to run more frequently.
• Committing to a further extension of the heavy rail network in urban centres (Sydney, Newcastle,
Illawarra) and investigating the extent to which this should be underground
• Increasing capacity by developing an extensive network of light rail along arterial roads, as well as in
between major centres, especially in Sydney’s West
• Expanding the rail freight network so as to serve all major industrial clusters and ports
• Upgrading the interstate and country rail network to allow trains to travel more quickly
• Reversing cuts to the country rail network
• Expanding bus priority programs and strategic bus lanes
• Rebuilding public transport staff numbers to ensure safe, comfortable and efficient services
• Upgrading railway stations, light rail and bus stops, ferry wharfs and interchanges to provide
adequate seating, shelter, bicycle storage and decent facilities for the disabled.
• Expansion of the cycleway network
• Planned integration of taxis and taxi cooperatives into the system
2. Public transport: publicly owned and democratically managed
While public transport in NSW has not experienced Victoria’s full-scale privatisation disaster, it has had its share of
flops and crises, the most spectacular being the Cross-City Tunnel and the Sydney airport rail link (presently being
run as a high-cost monopoly to help the state pay off its debts to the previous owners).
The privatisation of CityRail and CountryLink maintenance work also lies behind the familiar stories of breakdowns
and network decay—over the past 20 years short-term savings have been purchased at the price of a longer term
decline in standards as well as loss of expertise within the public system.
The Socialist Alliance stands for:
• Public ownership of all transport services and their administration by boards representing users,
workers and managers
• Renationalisation of private rail freight companies like Pacific National
• An end to public-private partnerships
• The taking into public ownership of private bus operations (presently subsidised to the tune of $555
million a year)
• Fully integrated planning of all transport modes. Instead of unplanned competition between private
transport, public transport and taxis, a comprehensive plan that specialises each mode where it best
fits
3. Making transport environmentally sustainable
Given that trains are 40 times and buses 3.5 times more energy efficient than cars, a sustained shift to public
transport will hugely benefit our environment. Moreover, even as public transport regains its place as the main
transport mode, it can lead the way by incorporating the latest environmentally sustainable technologies (eg,
lightweight materials, alternative propulsion systems).
The Socialist Alliance also stands for:
• Replacing semi-trailers and “B-doubles” as the major inter-city freight mode, with workers affected
to be retrained on full pay and incorporated into the expanded public transport system
• Electric and hybrid vehicles to replace commercial trucks and vans for the urban transport of freight
• Ending the construction of new motorways
• Ending all tax concessions for company and company-purchased cars
• Developing biofuels only where there is negligible impact on productive agricultural land and
biodiversity;
• Free carriage of bicycles on public transport;
• Making all new urban development dependent on the provision of adequate public transport
4. Funding
The shift in public transport infrastructure and services proposed here will require a large increase in funding. The
Socialist Alliance proposes:
• An increase in state debt to fund large-scale public transport infrastructure
• The imposition of a public transport levy on all CBD employers with more than 10 staff, along the
lines of the French versement de transport.
• Special levies on developers who gain access to commercially profitable sites close to railway
stations and bus interchanges.
www.socialist-alliance.org
Pretty interesting stuff... note the content regarding reliable baseload supply and the quote for savings from oil imports- $482billion per year. Also the payoff period- $1.5 trillion dollars to build the network of solar thermal plants across the US with a payback period of 3 years (!) due to reduced oil imports.

Sorry I've copied this from a PDF so its a bit lengthy. I had to remove some of the graphs because they didn't copy and paste into gmail

If anyone wants the PDF email me and I'll send it to ya.

Comradely
zane

SOLAR THERMAL ELECTRICITY AS THE PRIMARY REPLACEMENT
FOR COAL AND OIL IN U.S. GENERATION AND TRANSPORTATION
 
David R. Mills and Robert G. Morgan
Chairman, B.Sc., PhD (Physics); Chief Development Officer, B.A., M.S
Ausra, Inc.
2585 East Bayshore Rd. Palo Alto, CA 94303-3210, USA
Phone +1 650 353 9756; Fax: +1 650 494 3893
david.mills@...
 
 
Abstract
 
Advanced solar thermal electric options are dropping in price and some companies are beginning to intro-
duce thermal storage. This paper suggests not only that Solar Thermal Electricity (STE) has sufficient diurnal
and seasonal natural correlation with electricity load to supply the great majority of the US national grid (and
by logical extension, those of China and India) on an annual basis with only 16 hours of storage. The correla-
tion between the natural output and load exceeds 90% California and Texas, and also on the entire US grid.
Furthermore, STE can supply much of the transportation market without destroying these natural correla-
tions. The almost complete elimination of both fossil fueled generation and oil usage for transportation in the
USA appears to be technically feasible. 
 
Introduction
 
This paper is intended to stimulate thinking
about an integrated renewable energy strategy
to fully power the USA grid.  The sun is a much
larger practical energy resource than any non-
direct solar resource. This paper presents solar
electricity as the most likely means to nearly
eliminate contributions to global warming from
electricity generation by mid-century. Because
thermal storage is much cheaper than
electrical, mechanical or hydrogen storage,
solar electricity will probably be predominantly
in the form of solar thermal electricity (STE)
with thermal storage rather than photovoltaic
solar electricity with electrical or mechanical
storage. In this paper we use the term STE
rather than the less specific name
Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) because
CSP also includes PV concentrators (CPV), which do not have the crucial storage benefits of STE. 
 
STE uses a field of solar reflectors to create a hot fluid to run a heat engine such as a Rankine or Brayton
cycle.  STE is a proven concept using Rankine cycle turbines. It has been successfully demonstrated in the
Californian desert for two decades using commercial parabolic trough technology1 and steam turbines,
achieving an annual field availability of 99%. The US National Renewable Energy Lab uses a conservative
future total plant availability of 94%1, due primarily to O&M requirements of the conventional steam turbine
used. Central receiver (CR) technology, in which a small receiver on a high tower is illuminated by a field
of mirrors below, has also been developed using two-axis tracking heliostat reflectors and a commercial
plant PS10 has begun operation in Spain. A third option recently developed is the linear Fresnel reflector
(LFR) system in which long steam pipe receivers on towers are illuminated by long heliostats below2,3.  Our
CLFR (compact LFR) system (Fig. 1) is the basis of a recently announced 177 MW project with the PG&E
utility in California4.  Both CRs and LFRs currently generate steam directly with low parasitic pumping losses
and could be used in GW-sized fields.  
 
STE can use low cost energy storage in artificial thermal reservoirs. Oil storage was successfully demon-
strated commercially in the mid 1980's6 and molten salt is being commercialized in parabolic trough plants in
Spain7. Very low cost water-based thermal storage is expected to be commercialized within two years using
own technology under development.  Thermal storage can actually lower kWh cost because it reduces tur-
Figure 1. Visualization of the proposed 177 MW plant at
the Carrizo Plain, California.  Tracking linear reflectors
focus solar energy on elevated boiler tubes to produce
steam.

bine size required for a given thermal output. In STE designs using storage and no fuel, there is long term
also immunity from fuel cost rises. 
 
Currently, STE kWh cost is transitioning the cost of natural gas generation in California and is expected to be
near US new plant coal generation cost when plants get to 500 MW - 1 GW scale in a few years. Any tech-
nology which can displace coal and gas generation could also potentially eliminate vehicle emissions using
plug-in electric vehicles. Both markets are examined in this paper from a technical point of view, without de-
tailed reference to economics. The correlations of solar output power with grid load requirements are ex-
amined with reference to 2006 load data.
 
Load Model
 
The data on the Californian grid usage is based upon hour by hour grid load data from California (CAISO)8
and Texas (ERCOT)9. These loads are shown in Figures 2-5. A simple vehicle usage model was developed
by the authors from energy use data from the sources provided for Fig. 5.
 
Collector Model
 
The collector model used in this paper is part of the project model developed commercially for the CLFR
system (Fig. 1).  However, any solar system with the same number of hours of storage will exhibit broadly
similar correlations. The model uses ray trace results (two models have been used, an internally developed
one and SolTrace from NREL for model checking) to form an sun angle map of optical performance vs sun
position in the sky. The maps are incorporated into a TRNSYS model of the collector and power system,
which can incorporate storage modules. A simpler project model with project financial modules also is
provided with a collector and storage performance modules that are cross-correlated with the TRNSYS
model to ensure accuracy. The project model is run for every hour of the year and, where possible, load data
is entered also on an hourly time step.  Both TRNSYS and the project model develop a value for collected
solar radiation from archived solar radiation data, e.g. as available from the US National Renewable Energy
Laboratory (NREL)10.
 
The individual power block peak thermal efficiency was assumed to be 33%, but this assumption does not
affect the basic conclusions of the paper, which could be for any turbine size and efficiency since we are not
looking at detailed cost in this paper. The plant fleet size is arbitrarily made to equal the peak load
requirement of the state or country being modeled.  In this paper we use 50 GW for California,  63 GW for
Texas, and 1067 GW installed  and 789 GW non-coincident peak load for the USA (2006 data year). 
 
The solar multiple is the ratio of actual solar array size to the minimum size required to run a turbine at full
capacity at solar noon in mid-summer. Solar multiples greater than one are required when delivering power
outside daylight hours using storage. We use the short form SMx to indicate a solar multiple of x. The
storage used is only enough to carry load for 1- 2 days, and is used to match hourly output fluctuations in
solar input with hourly load.  These storage
levels do not provide seasonal or even weekly
storage, so are subject to local weather events,
especially sustained cloudy periods.
 
However, with the CLFR, we also use solar
multiples of up to 2 even when not using storage; 
this causes overproduction of thermal energy at
peak solar periods in summer (discarded by
turning some of the reflector field off-focus) but
allows better utilization of the turbine at other
times, increasing plant capacity factor.  Because
our models currently show improved economics
using a solar multiple of 2 in fields without
storage, we use SM2 as the non-storage
configuration with the best correlation with grid
load in this paper.
 
 
 
Figure 2.  Solar contribution to grid load in California
assuming no storage and a solar multiple SM2.  The
annual contribution is 40%.

Replacing fossil generation
 
The capacity factor is the ratio of actual energy supplied to the maximum possible supply by the installed
turbines over that period.  In Fig. 2, modeled monthly capacity factor (CF) is given for a 50 GW using the
2006 the Californian ISO grid load9.  The collector model uses and array of SM2, with the array being as-
sumed to only have storage in the thermal mass of the array pipes, fluid, and steam drums.  It can be seen
that, partially due to the SM2 strategy, the CF is reasonable and the array covers about 40% of the annual
California load.  This is excellent for a non-storage technology but not enough to allow the technology to
generate the majority of power on the grid.  
 
In Fig. 3, the same turbine fleet is now provided with
arrays in the SM2, SM3 and SM4 sizes, all with 16
hours of storage.  The chart shows the SM3 case to
exceed the grid load requirement at all times except
in winter, using a peak turbine capacity equal to the
peak load of 50 GW, recorded in the early afternoon
of July 24, 2006.  The 16 hour figure was chosen for
use in the graph because it was financially optimal
for the SM3 case; many other storage levels were
attempted.   The correlation with annual load is 92%,
without the application of any peaking plant, with
only 3% of energy having to be dumped (by turning
excess collector capacity off-focus). At SM2, the
monthly load is never carried, but zero energy is
dumped. At SM4, the entire grid load is carried, but
22% of energy is dumped. The lowest kWh cost
case is therefore near SM3, because the turbine op-
erates close to the capacity factor required by the
grid, while little energy is dumped.
 
In Fig. 4, the model results for the Texas ERCOT10
grid are given for SM2, SM3, and SM4. Again, 16
hours of storage was assumed. The chart shows the
least cost SM3 case to fall short in summer, using a
peak turbine capacity equal to the peak load hours of
the year.  This was 63 GW, recorded in the early af-
ternoon of May 8, 2006.  Again, SM3 is best, with a
91% correlation without needing peaking plant.
 
While the high supply fractions are compelling from a
regional viewpoint, a more ambitious thought experi-
ment addresses the supply of the entire national grid
from the modeled Texas and California solar arrays.
Of course, supply of the USA would take place from
many southern and western states, but using two
distant states like California and Texas is illustrative.  
 
In Fig. 5, the dashed line indicates the 2005 national
grid profile scaled to the 108 GW coincident peak of
the CAISO and ERCOT.  The result – surprisingly - is
even closer to the two-state blended solar generation
correlation, with 96% of the national annual grid
supply accessible to least cost SM3 STE.  However,
this chart was prepared by using monthly national
data, not the hourly data available through CAISO
and ERCOT.  Nevertheless, there is a close match
between the forms of load patterns of Texas, California, and the national grid, suggesting that similar
amounts of storage could be used to the same effect. Further, there would be a tendency for extreme local
weather events to be averaged out, and there would be hundreds of solar plants available with flexible sto-


rage and considerable geographic diversity. For this reason, a result close to or better than that in the Cali-
fornia case is not unreasonable.  
 
This close correlation in a country having a severe winter in the northern regions might seem not to be intui-
tively correct, but the excellent seasonal match at the national level can be better understood if one realizes
that winter home heating loads are carried out by non-electrical energy (gas and oil) and that air-conditioning
is mostly electrical. This produces a close national load correlation with solar seasonal availability similar to
that previously calculated for the warmer states.   
 
The 2005/6 U.S. national grid had a generating capacity of 1067 GW and non-coincident peak load of 789
GW 11.  Based on the current technology, a CLFR with SM3 and storage would require 1.5 square miles for
177 MW, translating a national land requirement equal to 23,418 km2 or a square with 153 km sides.
 
 
Replacing Oil
 
Recently there has been recent development of
lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors12 that may
provide the possibility of fast recharging electric
vehicles which would use zero fossil fuel. The
electricity for such vehicles would come from the
national and state grids, and therefore can be
supplied by grid-connected renewable energy with low
climate impact.   
 
The annual U.S. figure on 2006 for vehicle emissions
has been calculated by the DOE13 to be 2.0 billion
metric tonnes CO2 equivalent (CO2e). This is close to
the annual US Electricity generation emissions of 2.3
billion metric tonnes CO2 equivalent (CO2e). Together
this is 4.3 billion tonnes per year.
 
A Socolow Wedge14 is a saving of 1 billion tonnes of
Carbon emissions per year reduction. Multiplying by
44/12 to convert to tonnes of CO2e, a single wedge is
3.7 billion tonnes of CO2e per year.  Seven wedges
are require to drop the atmosphere to stabilisation of
550 ppm of CO2e over 50 years, so the potential of
removing emissions from the US generation and
vehicle fleets is 4.3/(3.7 x 7) x 100 = 17% of the entire
global reductions required.  The potential in other
markets like China, Europe and India is also large.
 
The U.S. national vehicle fleet-miles travelled were
1.0 x 1013 in 2005/615. Battery electric vehicles
typically use between 0.17 and 0.37 kWhe per mile, so
for 1.0 x 10^13 miles of vehicular travel the US would
need 1.7-3.7 x 10^6 GWh to fully eliminate vehicle
emissions from fuel use. In this thought experiment,
national solar generation would consequently have to
climb by 42% - 91% to accommodate an entirely
electrified vehicle fleet. The land area requirement for
the supporting CLFR generation plant would climb to
between 182 and 211 km on a side.
 
Superimposed on our electricity load, this would have some implications.  Although fast charging will be
available, it is likely that much of charging will take place in the home garage, leading to a stronger night
load. Because we do not have hourly data for the entire US grid, or a typical charging pattern, we can look at
a simple model in which the more extreme effect of placing 91% more generation into one state, California,
spreading the charging period over the period between 9 PM and 9 AM. It is likely that technical
Fig. 6  A SM3 solar fleet in California addressing a
grid load which includes the majority of static gen-
eration and an electric vehicle fleet.  The correlation
between solar output and load is 93%.

improvement would drive vehicle efficiency toward the lower end of the range after a decade of manufacture,
but the authors ignore this, This model also does not benefit from time zone displacement as would occur in
a national model. For both reasons, it can be regarded as a worst case. Fig 6 shows a calculation for
California, such that peak generation is now 50 GW x 1.91 = 95.5 GW.  It can be seen that the effect on the
model correlation is marginal, with the SM3 configuration continuing to be preferred and the correlation
slightly improved over the 50 GW California model in Fig. 3 at 93%.  This suggests that on a national basis,
the correlation will also remain high with a grid load which totally includes the vehicle sector.  For more
efficient vehicles, the added grid load would be smaller but the correlation similar.
 
The current cost of a CLFR system is approximately US$3000 per kW; we believe it will drop rapidly to
US$1500 per kW within a few years as a result of a numerous technical improvements already identified. At
a future estimated cost of $1500 per peak kilowatt, this is ($672 - $1456 billion)/0.93 (the 0.93 because we
only supplied 93% of power in the case calculated), or about $723 - $1566 billion in capital investment to
provide a grid which supplies the great majority of static and vehicular loads. The current cost of imported oil
to the USA at $100 per barrel at an import rate (in 2005/6) of $13.2 million barrels a day is $482 billion per
year. The simple payback time in balance of payments by substitution of solar for oil is approximately 1.5 - 3
years. Even at the current cost of the CLFR system, it would remain an attractive investment. This simple
economic argument neglects very large benefits to the local environment, which, in addition to global
environmental benefits, would include a much cleaner atmosphere in urban areas and the avoidance of
associated health costs.
 
Of course, the installation of transportation generation would not be immediate but would occur gradually. In
a somewhat aggressive scenario, if installation were spread over 30 years, then the annual generation
replacement cost would be between US$24 and US$52 billion. Each such annual investment would avoid
US$48 billion in imported fuel costs each year for the life of the plant. This would provide both a large and
continuing benefit to the US economy. The primary uncertainties in this calculation are the rate at which pure
electric vehicles can be introduced, and the assumed electricity usage per km.  However, the payback is so
high that only a very great increase in the cost of electric vehicles over fuelled vehicles could reverse the
economic benefit.  
 
Discussion
 
Although it is often said that "solar cannot produce base load electricity", STE is probably the only currently
available technology which can be considered for a globally dominant role in the electricity sector over the
next 40 years.
 
Humankind evolved to be most active when the sun was up, with our eyes having been optimized through
evolution for the sun's spectral emission.  This is why human activity and energy usage correlates signifi-
cantly with the energy delivery from direct solar systems. Additional seasonal correlations detected in this
paper result from the influence of the national building air-conditioning load, which is greater toward summer
months when the sun delivers more direct solar energy to the earth's surface. We have up to now largely
neglected these advantageous correlations when designing power systems technology. The results of this
paper suggest that such hourly and seasonal natural correlations with energy output from a solar system are
substantially enhanced using storage. An immediate advantage is that load-following solar plant does not
need expensive peaking plant backup. It is clear that natural correlations can be used to economic advan-
tage in solar power system design. 
 
The relevance of base load generation as a technical strategy needs to be carefully re-examined. Human
activity does not correlate well with base load coal or nuclear output. It should by now be recognized that
base load is what coal and nuclear technologies produce, not what is required by society and the environ-
ment.
 
Solar power with storage can take up as much of the grid generation load or vehicle energy load as is
desired, and can host other clean energy options by treating them as a negative grid load. A mixture of
storage and non-storage renewable options thus appears to be fully self-consistent as an alternative to the
present generation mix, with the main co-contributors to STE probably being hydroelectricity and wind. 
 
Conclusions
 
This paper suggests not only that STE is a energy option of great significance, but that with only 16 hours of
storage it has sufficient diurnal and seasonal natural correlation with electricity load to supply the great ma-
jority of the US national grid (and by logical extension, those of China and India) over the year, with the hour-
ly solar radiation data